References of "Vintila, Cristina-Daniela"
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See detailThe social and political background of MPs of immigrant origin: are they any different?
Dodeigne, Jérémy ULiege; Vintila, Cristina-Daniela ULiege; Morales, Laura

in Morales, Laura; Saalfeld, Thomas (Eds.) Pathways to power: the political representation of citizens of immigrant origin in Europe (in press)

This chapter examines the profiles of immigrant origin (IO) MPs in terms of social backgrounds and previous careers in eight European democracies: Belgium, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Spain, the ... [more ▼]

This chapter examines the profiles of immigrant origin (IO) MPs in terms of social backgrounds and previous careers in eight European democracies: Belgium, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom. The first research goal of this chapter is rather descriptive as we examine the extent to which IO MPs present different social backgrounds and career paths to parliaments in comparison with non-IO MPs. Are they any different from the ‘average’ non-IO MPs? Are they more or less representative of the voters than non-IO MPs? Do IO MPs follow the same career paths to the parliamentary arena than the rest of the MPs, or do they differ significantly from them? Based on the empirical findings to these questions, the second research goal is to identify patterns of convergence and divergence in the recruitment of non-IO MPs within and across the eight democracies under examination. The establishment of regional/national patterns is a preliminary and necessary condition for further and more refined ‘explanatory’ research studying the causes of cross-national variance. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (11 ULiège)
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See detailVisibility, integration models and political representation
Morales, Laura; Sobolewska, Maria; Vintila, Cristina-Daniela ULiege et al

in Saalfeld, Thomas; Morales, Laura; Sobolewska, Maria (Eds.) Understanding the patterns of political representation of citizens of immigrant origin in Europe (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (1 ULiège)
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See detailThe effects of party organizational procedures on the representation of immigrant origin citizens
Ramiro, Luis; Vintila, Cristina-Daniela ULiege; Konstantinidou, Angeliki ULiege

in Saalfeld, Thomas; Morales, Laura; Sobolewska, Maria (Eds.) Understanding the patterns of political representation of citizens of immigrant origin in Europe (in press)

This chapter focuses on the influence of two sets of variables for the representation of citizens of immigrant origin (CIOs). Firstly, we deal with parties’ internal organization and procedures. Secondly ... [more ▼]

This chapter focuses on the influence of two sets of variables for the representation of citizens of immigrant origin (CIOs). Firstly, we deal with parties’ internal organization and procedures. Secondly, we address party system components and dynamics. Party internal organization matters are related with the existence of specific organizational (sectorial bodies) for the representation of immigrant origin groups, and the existence of quotas (both in partisan bodies and in electoral lists) to foster the inclusion of CIOs. The rules of the candidate selection process will also be addressed. Specifically, who can be selected, the inclusiveness of the selectorate, the degree of decentralization of the candidate selection process, and the inclusiveness of the process for the selection of the party leader and the national executive committee. Last but not least, the parliamentary group size and turnover for the parties under analysis will also be examined. Regarding the impact of party system factors on the access of CIOs to elected office, variables such as the disproportionality of the electoral system, the effective number of parties, the level of party system fragmentation, and the share of the vote for radical right parties will be closely examined. [less ▲]

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See detailImmigrant integration policies and descriptive political representation
Vintila, Cristina-Daniela ULiege; Konstantinidou, Angeliki ULiege; Guerra, Simona et al

in Saalfeld, Thomas; Morales, Laura; Sobolewska, Maria (Eds.) Understanding the patterns of political representation of citizens of immigrant origin in Europe (in press)

This chapter addresses the extent to which the political opportunity structure (POS) in European democracies affects the outcomes of descriptive political representation of citizens of immigrant origin ... [more ▼]

This chapter addresses the extent to which the political opportunity structure (POS) in European democracies affects the outcomes of descriptive political representation of citizens of immigrant origin (CIOs) in national parliaments. The study comparatively examines the type of policies that European host countries adopt in order to accommodate diversity. It further discusses how implementing specific institutional and policy settings might alter the chances of CIOs of securing access to elected office. In particular, we focus on the main aspects of immigrant integration models through a wide range of contextual factors - the citizenship regime, the legal framework through which the host countries encourage immigrants’ active engagement in the political arena, the policy measures implemented in the field of antidiscrimination, and the existence of consultative bodies for the immigrant population- that might help to explain cross-countries variations in the levels of descriptive political representation of CIOs. [less ▲]

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See detailWelfare entitlements, consular services, and diaspora policies in non-EU sending states
Vintila, Cristina-Daniela ULiege; Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege

in Lafleur, Jean-Michel; Vintila, Cristina-Daniela (Eds.) Migration and social protection in Europe and beyond: a focus on non-EU sending states (Volume 3) (in press)

In the first part of this introductory chapter, we will briefly summarize the definition of the main concepts by referring to the introductory chapters of Volumes 1 and 2 which provide a more in-depth ... [more ▼]

In the first part of this introductory chapter, we will briefly summarize the definition of the main concepts by referring to the introductory chapters of Volumes 1 and 2 which provide a more in-depth conceptual discussion of the key notions guiding the three volumes. The second and the third part will discuss different contextual elements that help us to better understand the main dynamics of access to social protection in non-EU sending states. In the second part, we will discuss and compare the specificities of welfare regimes across the 12 non-EU countries included in our analysis. Based on previous studies, we will particularly highlight: a) the different historical development of social policies in non-EU contexts; b) the fact that specific schemes of social benefits rather generalised across European welfare regimes (as discussed in Volume 1) are absent in non-EU contexts or replaced by schemes following a quite different rationale and understanding of social exclusion risks; c) trends of policy diffusion by which non-EU sending states have implemented specific institutional schemes previously formalised in other contexts (including the EU, but also other countries from the same region) by adapting them to the specificities of the domestic environment and; d) recent developments of social protection cooperation within the framework of regional integration schemes in non-EU areas. The third part of the chapter will map out the main migration features of non-EU countries, thus aiming to capture the extent to which demographic pressures for the extension of social protection for different groups of mobile individuals have been translated into specific policies aiming to prevent these groups from facing social risks. In doing so, we will discuss the main historical drivers of migration to and from non-EU countries and provide an overview of the most important features of recent migration inflows and outflows shaping the immigration and emigration policy of these states. Furthermore, particular attention will be paid to specific migration policy developments at the intra-regional level (affecting mostly the access of intra-regional non-national residents to welfare in third countries) and key initiatives of bilateral and multilateral cooperation in the field of social security between non-EU sending states and EU countries allowing for a certain level of (ex)portability of social benefits (which affect not only the social protection coverage of third-country nationals residing in the EU, but also EU citizens’ access to welfare in third countries). The fourth part of the chapter will analytically confront (the absence of) sending states’ social policies in specific areas with their engagement in diaspora policies. Drawing on this analytical framework focusing on a potential trade-off between social protection and diaspora policies, the section will cluster the 12 non-EU countries included in the analysis according to the existence/absence of gaps in the policy attention they give to social protection issues faced by mobile and non-mobile citizens. Finally, the last part of the chapter will aim to summarize key explanatory variables (including the nature of welfare regimes, the history and drivers of migration, the economic and political leverage of migrant populations in/from non-EU countries) behind the variations in timing and scope of the social and diaspora policy developments observed across the 12 non-EU countries included in this Volume. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (3 ULiège)
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See detailSending states’ engagement with citizens abroad- conceptual and methodological challenges
Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege; Vintila, Cristina-Daniela ULiege

in Lafleur, Jean-Michel; Vintila, Cristina-Daniela (Eds.) Migration and social protection in Europe and beyond: comparing consular services and diaspora policies (Volume 2) (in press)

In this introductory chapter, we define and discuss the concepts used throughout the country chapters that compose this Volume and present a comparative analytical framework that allow us to compare EU ... [more ▼]

In this introductory chapter, we define and discuss the concepts used throughout the country chapters that compose this Volume and present a comparative analytical framework that allow us to compare EU Member States’ engagement with their emigrant populations. In the conceptual section of the article, we critically engage with the existing literature that has documented an intensification of sending states’ activism and creativity in engaging with this population. In doing so, we highlight several explanatory variables identified in past studies, such as increasing mobility, the economic dependence on migration (and in particular remittances), democratization, the desire to gain the political support of citizens abroad, or a shift to neo-liberal modalities of government. Yet, we argue that existing attempts to classify state engagement with citizens abroad present four important limitations: 1) they neglect the role of supranational institutions such as the EU in determining states’ ability to engage with nationals abroad; 2) they emphasize policy innovations but they overlook important variations in basic consular services offered to nationals abroad; 3) they focus exclusively on sending states from the Global South without the possibility of further generalising these results to other areas; and 4) they do not sufficiently take into account the external dimension of social policies as a form of diaspora engagement. In the second part of the chapter, we comparatively discuss the aggregated results of the country chapters that compose this Volume. To do so, we build an analytical framework around the concept of “consular and diaspora infrastructure”. This concept allows to distinguish and cluster states according to their “hard infrastructure” (i.e. the physical infrastructure put in place by sending states to interact with nationals abroad such as the consular network, agencies, consultative bodies…) and their “soft infrastructure” (i.e. the services offered by consulates, diaspora institutions and welfare institutions to nationals residing abroad). The paper allows to identify how engaged sending states are in addressing social risks faced by nationals residing abroad in five keys areas in the study of immigrant welfare: health, unemployment, old-age, family, and social assistance. Overall, this analysis allows us to cluster EU sending states according to their engagement for citizens abroad in the area of social protection and, at the analytical level, draw a different picture of sending states’ engagement with citizens in which the role of migration history, demographic factors or neoliberal modes of governance has to be reconsidered. To make this argument, we rely on the empirical findings and the discussion on state-diaspora relations contained in the country chapters. [less ▲]

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See detailMigration and access to welfare benefits: conceptual and methodological challenges
Vintila, Cristina-Daniela ULiege; Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege

in Lafleur, Jean-Michel; Vintila, Cristina-Daniela (Eds.) Migration and social protection in Europe and beyond: comparing access to welfare entitlements (Volume 1) (in press)

The main aim of this introductory chapter is to critically discuss the key concepts used throughout the country chapters and propose a comprehensive analytical framework allowing for a systematic ... [more ▼]

The main aim of this introductory chapter is to critically discuss the key concepts used throughout the country chapters and propose a comprehensive analytical framework allowing for a systematic comparison of the levels of inclusiveness/exclusiveness in migrants’ access to social protection in the EU. The first part of the chapter presents the research questions guiding this volume and provides a definition of our conceptual departing point of transnational social protection (official state-based policies/programmes aiming to respond to the social needs of mobile individuals). The section discusses different ways in which mobility has increasingly challenged the territorial principle that traditionally granted access to social benefits: a) via pressures towards host countries to extend access to social entitlements for foreigners based on the ius domicilii principle (residence-based entitlements); b) via specific demands towards home countries to ensure portability of social entitlements independently of the place of residence of the beneficiaries (nationality-based or contribution-based social benefits). This section also explains how migration has become a driver for increasing cooperation between states in the field of social security. We will thus emphasize how the inclusiveness of domestic welfare regimes is often conditioned by bilateral social security agreements between home and host countries and supranational legislation ensuring portability of rights and/or equal treatment provisions within regional integration schemes (the specific case of mobile EU citizens and the EU social security coordination which will be historically contextualised in this introduction). The second section critically engages with the existing scholarship on typologies of immigrant social protection regimes. Drawing on previous studies that aimed to classify the migrant population worldwide based on its access to social protection (see Holzmann et al., 2005 or Avato et al. 2010 among others), we identify several limitations of these existing typologies, including: the inadequacy of their interpretation of eligibility conditions due to an exclusive focus on non-discrimination provisions; their incomplete operationalization of social protection leading to potentially misleading results regarding the inclusiveness of welfare regimes; their over-estimation of the importance of portability of benefits to home countries; or their over-simplification of social protection legislations. The third section proposes an alternative way of measuring the inclusiveness of migrant social protection regimes. We thus explain the main rationale behind the different classifications used in the MiTSoPro project, including the categorization of social policy areas, the array of indicators used for specific entitlements, and the categorization of beneficiaries based on residence and nationality conditions. The section also discusses the main challenges in systematically comparing social entitlements across welfare regimes of different characteristics; and it further acknowledges the limitations of the study (its focus on “rights on paper”, the exclusion of certain migrant groups counting with a special status, difficulties in exporting European-centred typologies of social entitlements to non-European countries). The fourth part of the chapter identifies main patterns of convergence and divergence in the inclusiveness of national welfare regimes towards mobile individuals. Particular attention is paid to: a) the variation of inclusiveness across different policy areas across and within countries; b) inequalities of access to social protection between non-resident nationals and their resident counterparts and the general trend of limited exportability of social rights; c) inequalities of access to social entitlements between national and non-national residents and the differential treatment applied to third-country nationals; d) cross-country classifications of conditions of access to social benefits for mobile individuals. Finally, the last section discusses key explanatory factors for the differences between states and groups identified in the country chapters. In doing so, we explore not only migrants’ characteristics (demographic shares in home/host countries, general migration patterns and history, or their economic and political leverage), but also contextual factors related to their countries of origin and destination, such as the overall policy philosophy towards migration or the nature of the welfare state. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (4 ULiège)
See detailMigration and social protection in Europe and beyond: a focus on non-EU sending states (Volume 3)
Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege; Vintila, Cristina-Daniela ULiege

Book published by Springer Open Access, IMISCOE Research Series (in press)

In a context of increased ethnic diversity, strong politicisation of migration, and overexposure of mobile individuals to social risks, the access of migrants and their offspring to welfare has become a ... [more ▼]

In a context of increased ethnic diversity, strong politicisation of migration, and overexposure of mobile individuals to social risks, the access of migrants and their offspring to welfare has become a key area of concern across European democracies. The recent financial crisis has further intensified the salience of this topic in political discourses, at the societal level, and among social scientists. While a rapidly growing body of scholarship has explored how the strong supranational framework of EU social security coordination affects intra-EU migrants’ access to social benefits (see Sindbjerg Martinsen, 2005 or Blaugerger and Schmidt, 2014, among others), little is known so far about the procedures, scope and extension of welfare entitlements for third-country nationals in European destination countries (European Migration Network, 2014). Furthermore, the knowledge on the array of social benefits that states make available to non-citizen residents have been predominantly restricted to case studies, with relatively little evidence of larger cross-national research (see Holzmann et al., 2005; Sainsbury, 2006; Sabates-Wheeler and Feldman, 2011). Additionally, since migrants’ access to welfare has been traditionally studied from the perspective of receiving states, the critical role that sending states could play in protecting their nationals abroad against exposure to social risks is still understudied (Gamlen, 2008; Lafleur, 2013). This book is part of a series of 3 volumes that seek to address this research gap by providing the first comprehensive cross-country comparison of social protection policies and programmes targeting individuals in situation of international mobility. The 3 volumes adopt a top-down analytical approach of the concept of Transnational Social Protection from above, thus aiming to provide answers to the following research questions: Do migrants have access to social protection in Europe and in selected countries of origin located outside of Europe? What kind of social benefits can they access in their countries of residence and what type of social protection entitlements can they export from their countries of origin? Do some migrant groups benefit from an easier formal access to welfare benefits than others? Do some countries offer more inclusive social protection regimes for immigrants and emigrants alike? Beyond classic welfare state policies, how do consular and diaspora policies help nationals abroad address social risks? This third volume complements the first ones by taking the perspective of non-EU countries on immigrant social protection. Focusing on 12 of the largest sending countries to the EU, we present 24 chapters that follow the same structure as the one presented in volume 1 and 2. In other words, two “mirroring” chapters are dedicated to each of the 12 non-EU states analysed. One chapter focuses on access to social benefits across five core policy areas (health care, unemployment, old-age pensions, family benefits, guaranteed minimum resources) by highlighting the type of social protection policies that those countries offer to national residents, non-national residents, and non-resident nationals. The second “mirroring” chapter focuses on the same non-EU sending state but discusses the role of three key actors (consulates, diaspora institutions and home country ministries/agencies responsible for specific social policy areas) through which the country of origin interacts with its nationals abroad across the five policy areas previously mentioned. In short, this volume applies the approach developed in volume 1 and 2 to the specific cases of non-EU sending states. By doing so, the reader will be able to comprehend in one single volume what combination of social policy schemes and diaspora/consular programmes are available to the 12 major groups of third-country nationals residing in the EU. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (4 ULiège)
See detailMigration and social protection in Europe and beyond: comparing consular services and diaspora policies (Volume 2)
Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege; Vintila, Cristina-Daniela ULiege

Book published by Springer Open Access, IMISCOE Research Series (in press)

In a context of increased ethnic diversity, strong politicisation of migration, and overexposure of mobile individuals to social risks, the access of migrants and their offspring to welfare has become a ... [more ▼]

In a context of increased ethnic diversity, strong politicisation of migration, and overexposure of mobile individuals to social risks, the access of migrants and their offspring to welfare has become a key area of concern across European democracies. The recent financial crisis has further intensified the salience of this topic in political discourses, at the societal level, and among social scientists. While a rapidly growing body of scholarship has explored how the strong supranational framework of EU social security coordination affects intra-EU migrants’ access to social benefits (see Sindbjerg Martinsen, 2005 or Blaugerger and Schmidt, 2014, among others), little is known so far about the procedures, scope and extension of welfare entitlements for third-country nationals in European destination countries (European Migration Network, 2014). Furthermore, the knowledge on the array of social benefits that states make available to non-citizen residents have been predominantly restricted to case studies, with relatively little evidence of larger cross-national research (see Holzmann et al., 2005; Sainsbury, 2006; Sabates-Wheeler and Feldman, 2011). Additionally, since migrants’ access to welfare has been traditionally studied from the perspective of receiving states, the critical role that sending states could play in protecting their nationals abroad against exposure to social risks is still understudied (Gamlen, 2008; Lafleur, 2013). This book is part of a series of 3 volumes that seek to address this research gap by providing the first comprehensive cross-country comparison of social protection policies and programmes targeting individuals in situation of international mobility. The 3 volumes adopt a top-down analytical approach of the concept of Transnational Social Protection from above, thus aiming to provide answers to the following research questions: Do migrants have access to social protection in Europe and in selected countries of origin located outside of Europe? What kind of social benefits can they access in their countries of residence and what type of social protection entitlements can they export from their countries of origin? Do some migrant groups benefit from an easier formal access to welfare benefits than others? Do some countries offer more inclusive social protection regimes for immigrants and emigrants alike? Beyond classic welfare state policies, how do consular and diaspora policies help nationals abroad address social risks? This second volume complements the first one by looking specifically at the programmes and initiatives led by EU Member States to respond to the social protection needs of their non-resident citizens. This volume discusses the role of three key actors (consulates, diaspora institutions and home country ministries/agencies responsible for specific social policy areas) through which sending states interact with their nationals abroad across five policy areas: health care, unemployment, pensions, family benefits, and guaranteed minimum resources. This second volume also highlights that states often try to ensure the social protection of their nationals abroad by putting forward broader emigration-related policies that go beyond the realm of social security (e.g. specific funds to help nationals abroad deal with economic hardship, scholarships and educational programmes, ad hoc administrative assistance scheme to ensure access to rights, etc.). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (5 ULiège)
See detailMigration and social protection in Europe and beyond: comparing access to welfare entitlements (Volume 1)
Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege; Vintila, Cristina-Daniela ULiege

Book published by Springer Open Access, IMISCOE Research Series (in press)

In a context of increased ethnic diversity, strong politicisation of migration, and overexposure of mobile individuals to social risks, the access of migrants and their offspring to welfare has become a ... [more ▼]

In a context of increased ethnic diversity, strong politicisation of migration, and overexposure of mobile individuals to social risks, the access of migrants and their offspring to welfare has become a key area of concern across European democracies. The recent financial crisis has further intensified the salience of this topic in political discourses, at the societal level, and among social scientists. While a rapidly growing body of scholarship has explored how the strong supranational framework of EU social security coordination affects intra-EU migrants’ access to social benefits (see Sindbjerg Martinsen, 2005 or Blaugerger and Schmidt, 2014, among others), little is known so far about the procedures, scope and extension of welfare entitlements for third-country nationals in European destination countries (European Migration Network, 2014). Furthermore, the knowledge on the array of social benefits that states make available to non-citizen residents have been predominantly restricted to case studies, with relatively little evidence of larger cross-national research (see Holzmann et al., 2005; Sainsbury, 2006; Sabates-Wheeler and Feldman, 2011). Additionally, since migrants’ access to welfare has been traditionally studied from the perspective of receiving states, the critical role that sending states could play in protecting their nationals abroad against exposure to social risks is still understudied (Gamlen, 2008; Lafleur, 2013). This book is part of a series of 3 volumes that seek to address this research gap by providing the first comprehensive cross-country comparison of social protection policies and programmes targeting individuals in situation of international mobility. The 3 volumes adopt a top-down analytical approach of the concept of Transnational Social Protection from above, thus aiming to provide answers to the following research questions: Do migrants have access to social protection in Europe and in selected countries of origin located outside of Europe? What kind of social benefits can they access in their countries of residence and what type of social protection entitlements can they export from their countries of origin? Do some migrant groups benefit from an easier formal access to welfare benefits than others? Do some countries offer more inclusive social protection regimes for immigrants and emigrants alike? Beyond classic welfare state policies, how do consular and diaspora policies help nationals abroad address social risks? This first volume provides an in-depth analysis of social protection policies (health care, unemployment, pensions, family benefits, and guaranteed minimum resources) that EU Member States make accessible to national residents, EU and non-EU foreign residents, and non-resident nationals. Hence, the volume captures different scenarios in which the interplay between nationality and residence leads to inequalities of access to welfare. Each case study maps the eligibility conditions for accessing social benefits, by paying particular attention to the type of social entitlements that migrants can claim in host countries and/or export from home countries. In each country and for each policy area, we discuss the legislation regulating access to benefits in kind and cash, the legal definition of beneficiaries, the eligibility conditions applied for each type of benefit, and the period for which these benefits can be granted. Each case study also provides an assessment of the recent trends and directions in accessing social entitlements across the five policy areas of interest. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (4 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe political representation of citizens of immigrant origin in Spain, Italy and Greece
Vintila, Cristina-Daniela ULiege; Morales, Laura; Ramiro, Luis et al

in Morales, Laura; Saalfeld, Thomas (Eds.) Pathways to power: the political representation of citizens of immigrant origin in Europe (in press)

During the 1990s and the 2000s, Spain, Italy and Greece experienced a considerable growth of immigration. In just two decades, the immigrant population has multiplied more than five fold in all three ... [more ▼]

During the 1990s and the 2000s, Spain, Italy and Greece experienced a considerable growth of immigration. In just two decades, the immigrant population has multiplied more than five fold in all three countries and by the end of the 2000s, residents of immigrant origin already accounted for 7 per cent of the overall population in Italy, 8 per cent in Greece, and 13 per cent in Spain, respectively. This accelerated demographic change has put pressure on the democratic representative system of these countries, with large numbers of new residents and new citizens wishing to have a voice in the direction of collective affairs. Yet, their possibilities of securing political representation might have been constrained not only by the institutional and partisan setting in these “new” countries of immigration in Europe, but also by the fact that the public opinion has become increasingly concerned about immigration and immigrants’ integration in all three cases. The levels of descriptive representation of citizens of immigrant origin (CIOs) are still very reduced and quite distant to those found in other European countries, thus pointing to a common ‘South European’ pattern. The presentation shows how the above-mentioned institutional and societal factors have affected parties’ strategies in relation to the incorporation of CIOs into elected office and how issues relating to timing, the size of the CIO electorate (as opposed to the CIO resident population), and party competition dynamics might help us understand these descriptive representation gaps. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (8 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailReport on the political participation of mobile EU citizens: Belgium
Vintila, Cristina-Daniela ULiege; Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege; Nikolic, Louise

Report (2018)

In Belgium, EU citizens and third-country nationals have the right to vote in local elections. Third-country nationals only gain this right after five years of continuous residence in Belgium. EU citizens ... [more ▼]

In Belgium, EU citizens and third-country nationals have the right to vote in local elections. Third-country nationals only gain this right after five years of continuous residence in Belgium. EU citizens also enjoy passive electoral rights in local elections. Furthermore, EU citizens have the right to vote in and stand for the European Parliament (EP) elections held in Belgium. The electoral rights for nonresident Belgian citizens are more restrictive. Non-resident citizens have the right to vote, but not to stand for national legislative elections. Belgian citizens also have the right to vote for EP elections, whether they reside in another EU Member State or a third country, but only those residing in other EU Member States can stand as candidates for these elections. Once registered, all voters are obliged to vote in Belgium. Despite the dissemination efforts made by different institutions and civil society organizations for past elections in Belgium, a key difficulty that voters still face is the lack of information about the Belgian registration procedures and the political process more generally. Possible facilitators to encourage the political participation of non-citizen residents would be to formalise information dissemination strategies and communicate with new residents in different languages. [less ▲]

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Full Text
See detailReport on the political participation of mobile EU citizens: Romania
Vintila, Cristina-Daniela ULiege; Soare, Sorina

Report (2018)

Since Romania’s accession to the European Union, resident EU citizens enjoy the right to vote in and stand for local elections and European Parliament (EP) elections held in Romania. Due to the fact that ... [more ▼]

Since Romania’s accession to the European Union, resident EU citizens enjoy the right to vote in and stand for local elections and European Parliament (EP) elections held in Romania. Due to the fact that non-resident nationals vastly outnumber EU citizens residing in Romania, the enfranchisement of Romanians abroad is, however, a much more salient issue in Romania. Non-resident nationals may vote in national and EP elections, but cannot stand as candidates if they are registered with the domicile abroad. The turnout of non-citizen resident and non-resident citizens in elections held in Romania is overall quite low. Possible facilitators would be to simplify the voting and registration procedure and to introduce more awareness raising campaigns specifically targeting resident EU citizens and Romanians abroad. [less ▲]

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See detailMigration and transnational social protection
Vintila, Cristina-Daniela ULiege

Conference (2018)

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Peer Reviewed
See detailSocial protection entitlements for migrants in the EU: mapping the interplay between residence and nationality in accessing social benefits
Vintila, Cristina-Daniela ULiege; Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege

Conference (2018)

What kind of social benefits can migrants access in their countries of residence and what kind of social protection entitlements can they export from their countries of origin? Do some groups of non ... [more ▼]

What kind of social benefits can migrants access in their countries of residence and what kind of social protection entitlements can they export from their countries of origin? Do some groups of non-resident nationals and non-national residents benefit from an easier formal access to welfare benefits than others? Furthermore, are there any cross-country variations in the levels of inclusiveness that European welfare systems show towards individuals in situation of international mobility? In this paper, we argue that existing typologies of immigrant social protection regimes do not adequately answer these questions as they fail to capture the distinction operated by welfare states between residence-based and nationality-based entitlements to social benefits. The paper aims to propose a new analytical scheme that allows for the development of a comprehensive comparison of the social protection regimes that EU Member States offer to immigrants and emigrants alike. Drawing on data collected in the framework of the MiTSoPro project, the paper will seek to rank EU countries according to their levels of inclusiveness in the conditions of access of mobile individuals to different types of social benefits (pensions, healthcare, guaranteed minimum resources, unemployment benefits and family benefits). [less ▲]

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