References of "Van Galen, Gaby"
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See detailEvaluation of the foal survival score in a Danish-Swedish population of neonatal foals upon hospital admission
Bohlin, Anna; Saegerman, Claude ULiege; Hoeberg, Emma et al

in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (2019)

Background: It is highly desirable to assess the probability of survival in sick neonatal foals upon admission. The foal survival score (FSS) is a published scoring system used to estimate the probability ... [more ▼]

Background: It is highly desirable to assess the probability of survival in sick neonatal foals upon admission. The foal survival score (FSS) is a published scoring system used to estimate the probability of survival in hospitalized neonatal foals <4 days old. Hypothesis/Objectives: To evaluate the ability of the FSS to predict survival in older foals from a geographically different area compared to the original study. Animals: Five-hundred ninety hospitalized neonatal foals ≤14 days of age. Methods: Retrospective Danish-Swedish multicenter study that included details of signalment, history, clinical examination, laboratory results, necropsy findings, and outcome. Scores and score variables were compared between survivors and nonsurvivors using logistic regression. The optimal cutoff and its test parameters were calculated using a receiver operator characteristic curve. Results: Prematurity, cold extremities, ≥2 infectious or inflammatory sites, blood glucose concentration, and total white blood cell counts were significantly associated with nonsurvival (P ≤.02). The optimal cutoff to predict survival was ≥6, resulting in sensitivity 78%, specificity 58%, 92% positive predictive value, and 31% negative predictive value. The test performed equally well in foals <4 days old compared to those 4-14 days old. Conclusions and Clinical Importance: Using the suggested optimal cutoff of ≥6, the FSS performed moderately well and may aid in early determination of prognosis for survival. However, the FSS did perform differently in another population and therefore should be assessed under local conditions so that its diagnostic potential is not overestimated. © 2019 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine. [less ▲]

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See detailAcylcarnitines profile best predicts survival in horses with atypical myopathy
BOEMER, François ULiege; Detilleux, Johann ULiege; CELLO, Christophe ULiege et al

in PLoS ONE (2017)

Equine atypical myopathy (AM) is caused by hypoglycin A intoxication and is characterized by a high fatality rate. Predictive estimation of survival in AM horses is necessary to prevent unnecessary ... [more ▼]

Equine atypical myopathy (AM) is caused by hypoglycin A intoxication and is characterized by a high fatality rate. Predictive estimation of survival in AM horses is necessary to prevent unnecessary suffering of animals that are unlikely to survive and to focus supportive therapy on horses with a possible favourable prognosis of survival. We hypothesized that outcome may be predicted early in the course of disease based on the assumption that the acylcarnitine profile reflects the derangement of muscle energetics. We developed a statistical model to prognosticate the risk of death of diseased animals and found that estimation of outcome may be drawn from three acylcarnitines (C2, C10:2 and C18 -carnitines) with a high sensitivity and specificity. The calculation of the prognosis of survival makes it possible to distinguish the horses that will survive from those that will die despite severe sign of acute rhabdomyolysis in both groups [less ▲]

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See detailRetrospective evaluation of 155 adult equids and 21 foals with tetanus in Western, Northern, and Central Europe (2000-2014). Part 1: Description of history and clinical evolution.
Van Galen, Gaby ULiege; Saegerman, Claude ULiege; Rijckaert, Joke et al

in Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (2017)

OBJECTIVE: To describe clinical data of hospitalized adult equids and foals with tetanus. DESIGN: Multicenter retrospective study (2000-2014). SETTING: Twenty Western, Northern, and Central European ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To describe clinical data of hospitalized adult equids and foals with tetanus. DESIGN: Multicenter retrospective study (2000-2014). SETTING: Twenty Western, Northern, and Central European university teaching hospitals and private referral centers. ANIMALS: One hundred fifty-five adult equids (>6 months) and 21 foals (<6 months) with tetanus. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Information on geographic, annual and seasonal data, demographic- and management-related data, clinical history, clinical examination and blood analysis on admission, complications, treatments, and outcomes were described and statistically compared between adults and foals. The described cases were often young horses. In 4 adult horses, tetanus developed despite appropriate vaccination and in 2 foals despite preventive tetanus antitoxin administration at birth. Castration, hoof abscesses, and wounds were the most common entry sites for adults; umbilical cord infections and wounds for foals. Stiffness was the commonest observed initial clinical sign. Blood analyses frequently revealed an inflammatory response, hemoconcentration, muscle damage, azotemia, negative energy balance, liver damage, and electrolyte and acid base disturbances. Common complications or clinical signs developing during hospitalization included dysphagia, dyspnea, recumbency, hyperthermia, seizures, hyperlipemia, gastrointestinal impactions, dysuria, and laryngeal spasms. Cases were supported with wound debridement, antimicrobial treatment, tetanus antitoxin, muscle spasm and seizure control, analgesia, anti-inflammatory drugs, fluid therapy, and nutritional support. Mortality rates were 68.4% in adult horses and 66.7% in foals. Foals differed from adult horses with respect to months of occurrence, signalment, management-related data, potential causative events, clinical signs on admission, blood analysis, complications, and severity grades. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study that rigorously describes a large population of equids affected by tetanus. The information provided is potentially useful to clinicians for early recognition and case management of tetanus in adult horses and foals. Tetanus affects multiple organ systems, requiring broad supportive and intensive care. Neonatal and adult tetanus in the horse should be considered as distinct syndromes, as in human medicine. [less ▲]

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See detailRetrospective evaluation of 155 adult equids and 21 foals with tetanus from Western, Northern, and Central Europe (2000-2014). Part 2: Prognostic assessment.
Van Galen, Gaby ULiege; Rijckaert, Joke; Mair, Tim et al

in Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (2017)

OBJECTIVE: To identify prognostic variables for adult equids and foals with tetanus. DESIGN: Multicenter retrospective study (2000-2014). SETTING: Twenty Western, Northern, and Central European university ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To identify prognostic variables for adult equids and foals with tetanus. DESIGN: Multicenter retrospective study (2000-2014). SETTING: Twenty Western, Northern, and Central European university teaching hospitals and private referral centers. ANIMALS: One hundred fifty-five adult equids and 21 foals with tetanus. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Variables from history and clinical examination were statistically compared between survivors and nonsurvivors (adults: 49 survivors, 85 nonsurvivors; foals: 7 survivors, 10 nonsurvivors). Cases euthanized for financial reasons were excluded. Mortality rates in adults and foals were 68.4% and 66.7%, respectively. Variables associated with survival in adults included: standing, normal intestinal sounds and defecation, voluntarily drinking, eating soft or normal food, lower heart and respiratory rates, high base excess on admission, longer diagnosis time, treatment and hospitalization delay, and mild severity grade. Variables associated with death included: anorexia, dysphagia, dyspnea, low blood potassium concentration on admission, moderate and severe disease grading, development of dysphagia, dyspnea, recumbency and seizures during hospitalization, treatment with glycerol guaiacolate, intravenous fluids, and intravenous glucose solutions. Variables associated with survival in foals included standing on admission, voluntarily eating soft food and drinking, older age, and longer hospitalization delay. Outcome was not different between different tetanus antitoxin (TAT) dosages, although there was a trend of increasing survival rate with increasing TAT dosages. Cases with appropriate vaccination prior to development of tetanus were rare, but had improved outcome and shorter hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS: Prognosis for equine tetanus is poor with similar outcome and prognostic factors in foals and adults. The prognostic assessment of cases with tetanus provides clinicians with new evidence-based information related to patient management. Several prognostic indicators relate to the ability to eat or drink, and more severe clinical signs relate to poor outcome. Increasing intravenous dosages of TAT has no significant effect on outcome, but the positive trend identified may support a recommendation for high intravenous TAT dosages. Further evaluation is warranted. [less ▲]

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See detailMitochondrial function is altered in horse atypical myopathy
Lemieux, Hélène; BOEMER, François ULiege; Van Galen, Gaby ULiege et al

in Mitochondrion (2016), 30

Equine atypical myopathy in Europe is a fatal rhabdomyolysis syndrome that results from the ingestion of hypoglycin A contained in seeds and seedlings of Acer pseudoplatanus. The hallmark of atypical ... [more ▼]

Equine atypical myopathy in Europe is a fatal rhabdomyolysis syndrome that results from the ingestion of hypoglycin A contained in seeds and seedlings of Acer pseudoplatanus. The hallmark of atypical myopathy consists of a severe alteration in the energy metabolism including a severe impairment in muscle mitochondrial respiration that could contribute to its high death rate [less ▲]

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See detailAtypical myopathy in Denmark confirmed with the aTRAQ Assay
Høffer, Sofie Esbjørn; Votion, Dominique ULiege; Anderberg, Marie et al

in Journal of Equine Veterinary Science (2016), 47

Atypical myopathy is ais widespread in Europe and has been suspected in Denmark but no cases have been confirmed. This study confirmed cases in this country.

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See detailClinical sentinel surveillance of equine West Nile fever, Spain
Saegerman, Claude ULiege; Alba-Casals, A; Garcia-Bocanegra, I et al

in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases (2016), 63(2), 184-193

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See detailA retrospective study on equine herpesvirus type-1 associated myeloencephalopathy in France (2008-2011)
Van Galen, Gaby ULiege; Leblond, A; Tritz, P et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2015)

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See detailA retrospective study on Equine Herpes Virus type-1 associated myeloencephalopathy in France (2008-2011)
Van Galen, Gaby ULiege; Leblond, A; Tritz, P et al

Poster (2015)

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See detailEtiologie de la myopathie atypique : conditions de toxicité de l’agent causal – étude préliminaire
Patarin, F.; Van Galen, Gaby ULiege; Dopagne, Claude ULiege et al

in 40ème journée de la recherche équine (2014, March 18)

Recently it has been shown that atypical myopathy in Europe results from hypoglycin A ingestion, a toxin produced in the seeds (samares) of some trees of the genus Acer. Grasslands of 12 cases of atypical ... [more ▼]

Recently it has been shown that atypical myopathy in Europe results from hypoglycin A ingestion, a toxin produced in the seeds (samares) of some trees of the genus Acer. Grasslands of 12 cases of atypical myopathy for whom the toxic metabolite of hypoglycin A was found in the blood were visited by two experienced botanists in order to establish the list of the different species of trees found in or around these pastures. For all visited pastures, horses had the opportunity to ingest samaras from various maple species. The sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) was the only common tree in all pastures visited (n = 12 /12). Other trees with samaras were also found near or around the pastures. Since June 2013, a study is conducted to define the conditions of toxicity of several species of trees via the sampling, at regular intervals, of samaras and leaves. The study of the seasonal evolution of the toxicity of these trees in relation to weather conditions and specific biotopes will aim [less ▲]

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See detailMyopathie atypique : épidémiologie des cas européen. Pratique vétérinaire équine
Patarin, Florence; Van Galen, Gaby ULiege; Pitel, Christel et al

in Pratique Vétérinaire Équine (2014), 46(182), 12-14

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See detailGestion des cas, traitement et prévention chez les compagnons de pâture lors de myopathie atypique
Van Galen, Gaby ULiege; Votion, Dominique ULiege

in Pratique Vétérinaire Équine (2014), 46(182), 16-21

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See detailÉtiopathogénie de la myopathie atypique et gestion raisonnée des cas
Votion, Dominique ULiege; Patarin, Florence; Cerri, Simona ULiege et al

in In Proceedings: Journée AVEF (Association des Vétérinaires Equins Français) (2013, December)

Atypical myopathy is an acute intoxication resulting from the ingestion of a toxin contained in the seeds of some trees of the genus Acer (i.e. « maple trees »). The causes of the emergence of the disease ... [more ▼]

Atypical myopathy is an acute intoxication resulting from the ingestion of a toxin contained in the seeds of some trees of the genus Acer (i.e. « maple trees »). The causes of the emergence of the disease due to trees naturalized for many decades remain undetermined. Currently, there is no cure for atypical myopathy but symptomatic treatment may be revisited on the basis of knowledge of the aetio-pathogenesis of the disease. This paper compiles recommendations following a discussion on treatment of atypical myopathy held in October 2013 at the University of Liege (Belgium) to provide emergency treatment distinguishing clinical management (1) at hospital, (2) in the field and (3) preventive measures to protect pasture companions. [less ▲]

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See detailSEPTIC ARTHRITIS OF THE ATLANTO-OCCIPITAL JOINT IN TWO ADULT HORSES
Rabba, Silvia ULiege; Bolen, Géraldine ULiege; Evrard, Laurence ULiege et al

Poster (2013, September)

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See detailIdentification of methylenecyclopropyl acetic acid in serum of European horses with atypical myopathy
Votion, Dominique ULiege; Van Galen, Gaby ULiege; Sweetan et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal (2013)

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See detailCan horses be clinically screened for West Nile fever ?
Van Galen, Gaby ULiege; Calozet, L; Leblond, Agnès et al

in Veterinary Record: Journal of the British Veterinary Association (2013), 172(4), 101

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See detailTrachéotomie temporaire chez le cheval
Gabriel, Annick ULiege; Hontoir, Fanny; Van Galen, Gaby ULiege et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2013), 157

Tracheotomy means the incision of the trachea with the aim to bypass the nasal area, larynx and cranial trachea. Tracheotomy is often performed as an emergency procedure under difficult conditions. This ... [more ▼]

Tracheotomy means the incision of the trachea with the aim to bypass the nasal area, larynx and cranial trachea. Tracheotomy is often performed as an emergency procedure under difficult conditions. This article firstly describes the anatomy, histology and clinical examination of the trachea in horses. Secondly, it gives the indications for temporary tracheotomy, surgical technique as well as associated risks. [less ▲]

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See detailTraditional and quantitative assessment of acid-base and shock variables in horses with atypical myopathy
Van Galen, Gaby ULiege; Cerri, Simona ULiege; Porter, S et al

in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (2013), 27(1), 186-193

BACKGROUND: Descriptions of acid-base disturbances in atypical myopathy (AM) are limited. OBJECTIVES: Describe and compare traditional and quantitative acid-base abnormalities and cardiovascular shock ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Descriptions of acid-base disturbances in atypical myopathy (AM) are limited. OBJECTIVES: Describe and compare traditional and quantitative acid-base abnormalities and cardiovascular shock status in horses with AM at admission. ANIMALS: 34 horses with AM, 15 healthy controls. METHODS: Retrospective case-control study. Records were searched for shock variables (packed cell volume [PCV], blood urea nitrogen [BUN], heart and respiratory rate) and acid-base variables (venous blood gas analysis, electrolytes, total protein, lactate) on admission. Base excess (BE) of free water (BEfw), chloride (BEcl), total protein (BEtp), and unidentified anions (BEua), anion gap (AG), measured strong ion difference (SIDm), and concentration of total nonvolatile weak acids ([Atot]) were calculated. Acid-base classifications, using simplified strong ion model and traditional approach, and shock grades were assigned. A 2-sample Wilcoxon rank-sum test and Bonferroni correction compared variables in AM cases versus control horses. Significance was P < .05/16 for acid-base and P < .05/5 for shock variables. RESULTS: Tachycardia, tachypnea, and normal to increased PCV and BUN were common in AM cases. Respiratory, metabolic acid-base alterations, or both were mainly caused by respiratory alkalosis, lactic acidosis, and SIDm alkalosis, alone or in combination. Evaluated variables (except pH, potassium concentration, total protein, and related calculations) were significantly different (P < .001) between AM cases and control horses. The strong ion model provided a more accurate assessment than the traditional approach and identified mixed derangements. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: Acid-base derangements should be evaluated in horses with AM and this preferably with the strong ion model. [less ▲]

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