References of "Van Akelyen, Dylan"
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See detailInvestigation of visual and verbal inhibition in aging within a similarity-judgement task
Van Akelyen, Dylan ULiege; Gregoire, Coline ULiege; Majerus, Steve ULiege

Poster (2020, May 27)

Inhibition is a central component of executive control that allows us to focus on target stimuli and to ignore non-target stimuli. Aging has been associated with reduced inhibitory abilities, but data are ... [more ▼]

Inhibition is a central component of executive control that allows us to focus on target stimuli and to ignore non-target stimuli. Aging has been associated with reduced inhibitory abilities, but data are contradictory as regards the domain-specificity versus generality of this impairment. The aim of this study was to conduct a comprehensive assessment of inhibitory abilities in aging by focusing on visual and verbal domains (phonological and semantic modalities). A similarity judgement task was administered in all three modalities to thirty young (20-40) and thirty elderly (60-80) adults. Participants had to judge which item out of two was the most similar to two target items. In the facilitation condition, the correct test item was preactivated via a prime appearing briefly before the trial; in the inhibition condition, the prime preactivated the wrong test item which then had to be inhibited for selection of the correct test item. An inhibition score was calculated by subtracting the performance in the inhibition condition from the facilitation condition (for correct responses and reaction times) For correct responses, we observed that the inhibition score was larger in the elderly vs. young group in each of the three modalities. For response times, the inhibition score was larger in the elderly group for the visual and semantic modalities but not phonological modality, meaning that they had more difficulties to inhibit the wrongly primed item. These results confirm inhibitory impairment in healthy aging, in a manner that appears to be rather domain-general (in verbal and visual domains). [less ▲]

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See detailLong-term memory effects in working memory are not always automatic: evidence from the imageability effect
Kowialiewski, Benjamin ULiege; Van Akelyen, Dylan ULiege; Majerus, Steve ULiege

Poster (2019, September 26)

Verbal working memory (WM) is influenced by linguistic knowledge; this influence is considered to reflect non-strategic linguistic activation during WM. This may however not be true for the influence of ... [more ▼]

Verbal working memory (WM) is influenced by linguistic knowledge; this influence is considered to reflect non-strategic linguistic activation during WM. This may however not be true for the influence of semantic knowledge as involved in the imageability effect (recall of high vs. low imageability words). We assessed the role of controlled processes such as semantic elaboration in the occurrence of the imageability effect. Sixty participants recalled six-item lists composed of high or low imageability words, with an interfering task presented during encoding for half of trials. The interfering task either involved semantic judgment supposed to prevent semantic elaboration processes, or similarly demanding visuo-spatial judgement processes. We observed robust evidence for a reduced word imageability effect in the semantic but not in the visuo-spatial interfering condition. These results suggest that the occurrence of the imageability effect in WM tasks relies partially on semantic elaboration strategies. [less ▲]

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See detailWhere does the imageability effect in working memory come from?
Kowialiewski, Benjamin ULiege; Van Akelyen, Dylan ULiege; Majerus, Steve ULiege

Poster (2019, May 14)

Working memory is influenced by several linguistic long-term memory factors. One of these factors is the imageability effect, in which concrete or high imageability words (e.g. cat, tree) are better ... [more ▼]

Working memory is influenced by several linguistic long-term memory factors. One of these factors is the imageability effect, in which concrete or high imageability words (e.g. cat, tree) are better recalled as compared to abstract or low imageability words (e.g. phase, doubt). The precise origin of this effect is however a matter of debate. In this study, we assessed the hypothesis that the occurrence of the imageability effect in WM tasks is conditioned to the implementation of semantic elaborative processes. Thirty-nine young healthy adult participants were invited to encode and immediately recall six-items lists composed of either high or low imageability words. In half of the trials, participants had to perform a secondary interfering task involving an animal classification judgement task aimed at preventing the implementation of semantic elaborative processes on the memoranda. We found a very strong impact of the imageability dimension and the interfering task (BF10 > 100) on recall accuracy but there was no reliable evidence for a reduction of the imageability effect in the interfering condition (BF10 = .833). Our results suggest that semantic elaborative processes are not a necessary condition for the observation of imageability effects in WM. [less ▲]

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