References of "VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHypnosis for cingulate-mediated analgesia and disease treatment
Trujillo-Rodriguez, Diana ULiege; FAYMONVILLE, Marie-Elisabeth ULiege; VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULiege et al

in Vogt, Brendt A (Ed.) Cingulate Cortex (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (5 ULiège)
See detailDisorders of consciousness: new advances in neuroimaging techniques
Soddu, Andrea ULiege; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULiege; VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULiege et al

in Zanotti, Bruno (Ed.) Vegetative State (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 196 (21 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe impact of non-pharmacological approaches on the patient’s comfort after a cardiac surgery: A randomized controlled trial.
Rousseaux, Floriane ULiege; Puttaert, Ninon ULiege; LEDOUX, Didier ULiege et al

Conference (2019, May 30)

Different non-pharmacological techniques including hypnosis, music, and virtual reality (VR) are being used as complementary tools in the treatment of pain. A new technique which encompasses a combination ... [more ▼]

Different non-pharmacological techniques including hypnosis, music, and virtual reality (VR) are being used as complementary tools in the treatment of pain. A new technique which encompasses a combination of hypnosis and VR, called "virtual reality hypnosis" (VRH), should soon be used on a regular basis in clinical settings. The aim of this study is to better understand the impact of hypnosis, music, VR and VRH, and to investigate their influence on the patient’s perception of pain, anxiety and tiredness after a cardiac surgery in intensive care unit [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 93 (8 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStudy of the impact of non-pharmacological techniques (self-hypnosis/self-care) on cognitive complaints in cancer patients
Bicego, Aminata Yasmina ULiege; Grégoire, Charlotte; Cassol, Helena ULiege et al

Conference (2019, May 30)

Cancer diagnosis generates a number of physical, psychological and cognitive impairments such as memory, attentional and informational processing deficits that can undermine patients’ quality of life (QoL ... [more ▼]

Cancer diagnosis generates a number of physical, psychological and cognitive impairments such as memory, attentional and informational processing deficits that can undermine patients’ quality of life (QoL). Self-hypnosis combined to self-care learning have been used in the past years to treat these symptoms, at the moment of diagnosis, during and/or after the cancer treatments. However, the impact of self-hypnosis/self-care upon cognitive difficulties has not been investigated yet.The aim of this study is to better understand the impact of self hypnosis/self-care upon the cognitive functions by means of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Cognitive Function1 (FACT-COG). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 128 (14 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLinks between the level of consciousness and swallowing: what can we learn from patients in altered states of consciousness?
MELOTTE, Evelyne ULiege; MAUDOUX, Audrey ULiege; DELHALLE, Sabrina ULiege et al

in Abstract Book - IBIA 2019 (2019, March)

Introduction: The aims of this study were to document the extent and characteristics of dysphagia in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC) and to evaluate the link between consciousness and ... [more ▼]

Introduction: The aims of this study were to document the extent and characteristics of dysphagia in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC) and to evaluate the link between consciousness and different components of swallowing. Method: We collected and analyzed 10 criteria in link with oral-feeding, respiratory status and Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (FEES) in 103 DOC patients (43 women; mean age 39±13years) admitted consecutively to the University Hospital of Liege (Belgium) for a one-week multimodal assessment of consciousness. The inclusion criteria were: to have had a coma and severe acquired brain injury, to have performed a FEES, and to have a diagnosis of DOC (unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS)1 or minimally conscious state (MCS)2) confirmed by at least 5 assessments with the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised3 and by positron emission tomography (presence or absence of metabolic activity in the fronto-parietal network bilaterally). We performed a univariate logistic regression between several swallowing related parameters and consciousness diagnosis (UWS or MCS). Logistic regression was adjusted for age, time since insult and etiology. Results: Thirty-one patients were UWS (13 females, 11 with traumatic etiology, 16 post-anoxic and 4 others; 25±23 months post-insult) and 72 were MCS (30 females, 43 from traumatic brain injury, 12 post-anoxic and 17 others; 40±34 months post-insult). Compared with MCS patients, UWS patients had more frequently a tracheotomy still in place (68% UWS vs 24% MCS, p=0.002), pharyngo-laryngeal secretions (60% UWS vs 28% MCS, p=0.032), salivary aspiration (39% UWS vs 13% MCS, p=0.039) and the absence of an efficient oral phase (lip prehension, lingual propulsion and the absence of buccal stasis after swallowing) (0% UWS vs 62% MCS, p=0.003). The other observed parameters (i.e., the presence of an exclusive enteral-feeding, poor sensibility in the pharyngo-laryngeal area, hypertonia of the jaw muscles, basic oral phase of swallowing and thick/liquid aspiration) were not significantly influenced by the level of consciousness in our cohort. Conclusion: some components of swallowing correlate with the level of consciousness in our population of patients with DOC, particularly the efficacy of the oral phase of swallowing. This criterion should be considered as a sign of consciousness, and consequently, it should be taken into account in the diagnosis of DOC. The study also emphasizes the severity of dysphagia in DOC population and highlights the importance of correctly managing these disorders. 1 Bruno et al. (2011). From unresponsive wakefulness to minimally conscious PLUS and functional locked-in syndromes: recent advances in our understanding of disorders of consciousness. Journal of Neurology, 258(7), 1373-1384. 2 Giacino et al. (2002). The minimally conscious state: definition and diagnostic criteria. Neurology, 58(3), 349-353. 3 Giacino et al. (2004) The JFK Coma recovery scale-revised: measurement characteristics and diagnostic utility. Arch Phys Med Rehabil, 85, 2020–2029. 4 Bodart et al. (2017) Measures of metabolism and complexity in the brain of patients with disorders of consciousness. NeuroImage: Clinical, 14, 354‑362. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 79 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEfficacy of a hypnosis-based intervention to improve well-being for prostate and breast cancer patients
Grégoire, Charlotte ULiege; Bragard, Isabelle ULiege; Nicolas, Hubert et al

Conference (2018, November 13)

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (9 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailA Heartbeat Away From Consciousness: Heart Rate Variability Entropy can discriminate disorders of consciousness and is correlated with resting-state fMRI brain connectivity of the Central Autonomic Network
Riganello, Francesco ULiege; Larroque, Stephen Karl ULiege; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULiege et al

Poster (2018, October)

Motivation: Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects the heart-brain two-way dynamic interactions[1-5]. HRV entropy analysis quantifies the unpredictability and complexity of the heart rate beats intervals ... [more ▼]

Motivation: Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects the heart-brain two-way dynamic interactions[1-5]. HRV entropy analysis quantifies the unpredictability and complexity of the heart rate beats intervals and over multiple time scales using multiscale entropy (MSE)[6-8]. The complexity index (CI) provides a score of a system’s complexity by aggregating the MSE measures over a range of time scales[8]. Most HRV entropy studies have focused on acute traumatic patients using task-based designs[9]. We here investigate the CI and its discriminative power in chronic patients with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS) and minimally conscious state (MCS) at rest, and its relation to brain functional connectivity. Methods: We investigated the CI in short (CIs) and long (CIl) time scales in 16 UWS and 17 MCS sedated. CI for MCS and UWS groups were compared using a Mann-Whitney exact test. Spearman’s correlation tests were conducted between the Coma Recovery Scale-revised (CRS-R) and both CI. Discriminative power of both CI was assessed with One-R machine learning model. Correlation between CI and brain connectivity (detected with functional magnetic resonance imagery using seed-based and hypothesis-free intrinsic connectivity) was investigated using a linear regression in a subgroup of 12 UWS and 12 MCS patients with sufficient image quality. Results and Discussion: Significant differences were found between MCS and UWS for CIs and CIl (0.0001≤p≤0.006). Significant correlations were found between CRS-R and CIs and CIl (0.0001≤p≤0.026). The One-R classifier selected CIl as the best discriminator between UWS and MCS with 85% accuracy, 19% false positive rate and 12% false negative rate after a 10-fold cross-validation test. Positive correlations were observed between CI and brain areas belonging to the autonomic system. CI was found to be significantly higher in MCS compared to UWS patients, with high discriminative power and lower false negative rate than the reported misdiagnosis rate of human assessors, providing an easy, inexpensive and non-invasive diagnosis tool. CI is correlated to functional connectivity changes in brain regions belonging to the autonomic nervous system, suggesting that CI can provide an indirect way to screen and monitor connectivity changes in this neural system. Future studies should investigate further the extent of CI’s predictive power for other pathologies in the disorders of consciousness spectrum. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (13 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCross-sectional swallowing study in patients with disorders of consciousness
MELOTTE, Evelyne ULiege; Delhalle, Sabrina; Gosseries, Olivia ULiege et al

Poster (2018, September 29)

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (7 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA Heartbeat Away From Consciousness: Heart Rate Variability Entropy Can Discriminate Disorders of Consciousness and Is Correlated With Resting-State fMRI Brain Connectivity of the Central Autonomic Network
Riganello, Francesco ULiege; Larroque, Stephen Karl ULiege; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULiege et al

in Frontiers in Neurology (2018), 9

Background: Disorders of consciousness are challenging to diagnose, with inconsistent behavioral responses, motor and cognitive disabilities, leading to approximately 40% misdiagnoses. Heart rate ... [more ▼]

Background: Disorders of consciousness are challenging to diagnose, with inconsistent behavioral responses, motor and cognitive disabilities, leading to approximately 40% misdiagnoses. Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects the complexity of the heart-brain two-way dynamic interactions. HRV entropy analysis quantifies the unpredictability and complexity of the heart rate beats intervals. We here investigate the complexity index (CI), a score of HRV complexity by aggregating the non-linear multi-scale entropies over a range of time scales, and its discriminative power in chronic patients with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS) and minimally conscious state (MCS), and its relation to brain functional connectivity. Methods: We investigated the CI in short (CIs) and long (CIl) time scales in 14 UWS and 16 MCS sedated. CI for MCS and UWS groups were compared using a Mann-Whitney exact test. Spearman's correlation tests were conducted between the Coma Recovery Scale-revised (CRS-R) and both CI. Discriminative power of both CI was assessed with One-R machine learning model. Correlation between CI and brain connectivity (detected with functional magnetic resonance imagery using seed-based and hypothesis-free intrinsic connectivity) was investigated using a linear regression in a subgroup of 10 UWS and 11 MCS patients with sufficient image quality. Results: Higher CIs and CIl values were observed in MCS compared to UWS. Positive correlations were found between CRS-R and both CI. The One-R classifier selected CIl as the best discriminator between UWS and MCS with 90% accuracy, 7% false positive and 13% false negative rates after a 10-fold cross-validation test. Positive correlations were observed between both CI and the recovery of functional connectivity of brain areas belonging to the central autonomic networks (CAN). Conclusion: CI of MCS compared to UWS patients has high discriminative power and low false negative rate at one third of the estimated human assessors' misdiagnosis, providing an easy, inexpensive and non-invasive diagnostic tool. CI reflects functional connectivity changes in the CAN, suggesting that CI can provide an indirect way to screen and monitor connectivity changes in this neural system. Future studies should assess the extent of CI's predictive power in a larger cohort of patients and prognostic power in acute patients. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (13 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHypnose et recherche : que se passe-t-il à Liège ?
Rousseaux, Floriane ULiege; FAYMONVILLE, Marie-Elisabeth ULiege; Nyssen, Anne-Sophie ULiege et al

in HEGEL: Penser par Soi-Même (2018), 8(3),

Depuis quelques années, il est de plus en plus clair que l’hypnose présente un champ de recherche fondamentale et appliquée important. L’Hôpital Universitaire (CHU) ainsi que l’Université de Liège font ... [more ▼]

Depuis quelques années, il est de plus en plus clair que l’hypnose présente un champ de recherche fondamentale et appliquée important. L’Hôpital Universitaire (CHU) ainsi que l’Université de Liège font partie des centres pionniers s’intéressant à l’étude de l’hypnose en tant qu’objet de recherche. Ces équipes ont pour objectif de comprendre les bases neurophysiologiques de la conscience humaine, les effets de la suggestion et les dimensions biopsychologiques qui en découlent pour pouvoir intégrer cet outil au mieux dans la pratique médicale à Liège. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (13 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailA Heartbeat Away From Consciousness: Heart Rate Variability Entropy can discriminate disorders of consciousness and is correlated with resting-state fMRI brain connectivity of the Central Autonomic Network
Riganello, Francesco ULiege; Larroque, Stephen Karl ULiege; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULiege et al

Poster (2018, June 21)

Motivation: Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects the heart-brain two-way dynamic interactions[1-5]. HRV entropy analysis quantifies the unpredictability and complexity of the heart rate beats intervals ... [more ▼]

Motivation: Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects the heart-brain two-way dynamic interactions[1-5]. HRV entropy analysis quantifies the unpredictability and complexity of the heart rate beats intervals and over multiple time scales using multiscale entropy (MSE)[6-8]. The complexity index (CI) provides a score of a system’s complexity by aggregating the MSE measures over a range of time scales[8]. Most HRV entropy studies have focused on acute traumatic patients using task-based designs[9]. We here investigate the CI and its discriminative power in chronic patients with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS) and minimally conscious state (MCS) at rest, and its relation to brain functional connectivity. Methods: We investigated the CI in short (CIs) and long (CIl) time scales in 16 UWS and 17 MCS sedated. CI for MCS and UWS groups were compared using a Mann-Whitney exact test. Spearman’s correlation tests were conducted between the Coma Recovery Scale-revised (CRS-R) and both CI. Discriminative power of both CI was assessed with One-R machine learning model. Correlation between CI and brain connectivity (detected with functional magnetic resonance imagery using seed-based and hypothesis-free intrinsic connectivity) was investigated using a linear regression in a subgroup of 12 UWS and 12 MCS patients with sufficient image quality. Results and Discussion: Significant differences were found between MCS and UWS for CIs and CIl (0.0001≤p≤0.006). Significant correlations were found between CRS-R and CIs and CIl (0.0001≤p≤0.026). The One-R classifier selected CIl as the best discriminator between UWS and MCS with 85% accuracy, 19% false positive rate and 12% false negative rate after a 10-fold cross-validation test. Positive correlations were observed between CI and brain areas belonging to the autonomic system. CI was found to be significantly higher in MCS compared to UWS patients, with high discriminative power and lower false negative rate than the reported misdiagnosis rate of human assessors, providing an easy, inexpensive and non-invasive diagnosis tool. CI is correlated to functional connectivity changes in brain regions belonging to the autonomic nervous system, suggesting that CI can provide an indirect way to screen and monitor connectivity changes in this neural system. Future studies should investigate further the extent of CI’s predictive power for other pathologies in the disorders of consciousness spectrum. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 138 (10 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTranscranial direct current stimulation unveils covert consciousness
Thibaut, Aurore ULiege; Chatelle, Camille ULiege; VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULiege et al

in Brain Stimulation (2018), 11(3), 642-644

Detailed reference viewed: 122 (24 ULiège)