References of "Uyttenbroeck, Roel"
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See detailEffect of flower traits and hosts on the abundance of parasitoids in perennial multiple species wildflower strips sown within oilseed rape (Brassica napus) crops
Hatt, Séverin ULiege; Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULiege; Chevalier Mendes Lopes, Thomas et al

in Arthropod-Plant Interactions (2018)

Reducing the use of insecticides is an important issue for agriculture today. Sowing wildflower strips along field margins or within crops represents a promising tool to support natural enemy populations ... [more ▼]

Reducing the use of insecticides is an important issue for agriculture today. Sowing wildflower strips along field margins or within crops represents a promising tool to support natural enemy populations in agricultural landscapes and, thus, enhance conservation biological control. However, it is important to sow appropriate flower species that attract natural enemies efficiently. The presence of prey and hosts may also guide natural enemies to wildflower strips, potentially preventing them from migrating into adjacent crops. Here, we assessed how seven flower traits, along with the abundance of pollen beetles (Meligethes spp., Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) and true weevils (Ceutorhynchus spp., Coleoptera: Curculionidae), affect the density of parasitoids of these two coleopterans in wildflower strips sown in an oilseed rape field in Gembloux (Belgium). Only flower traits, not host (i.e. pollen beetles and true weevils) abundance, significantly affected the density of parasitoids. Flower colour, ultraviolet reflectance and nectar availability were the main drivers affecting parasitoids. These results demonstrate how parasitoids of oilseed rape pests react to flower cues under field conditions. Similar analyses on the pests and natural enemies of other crops are expected to help to develop perennial flower mixtures able to enhance biological control throughout a rotation system. [less ▲]

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See detailSowing flower strips in a wheat field to enhance biological control of aphids and support pollinators
Amy, Clara ULiege; Brigode, Mélanie ULiege; Hatt, Séverin ULiege et al

Poster (2017, November 14)

Insect pests are responsible, among other factors, for reducing the productivity of crops. While chemical insecticides used to control them cause harmful effects on human health and the environment ... [more ▼]

Insect pests are responsible, among other factors, for reducing the productivity of crops. While chemical insecticides used to control them cause harmful effects on human health and the environment, conservation biological control, i.e. managing habitats in agricultural landscapes to support pest natural enemies, turns out to be a promising approach. Moreover, the decline of pollinators in agricultural areas is observed since a few decades, being partly due to the intensification of agriculture which homogenizes and degrades agricultural landscape. To reduce the detrimental effects of agricultural intensification on biodiversity, ecosystem functioning and ecosystem services, farmers have the opportunity to adopt agri-environmental measures. Among them, the establishment of flower strips, with a recognized interest in biological control and the conservation of pollinators, is proposed. However, their establishment is not systematically efficient and profitable for the farmers. Adapting mixture composition to farmer’s need may encourage their adoption. Thus, the research project has a double goals (i) to provide intercropping flower strips for promoting the attraction of beneficial insects against pests and for promoting pollinators diversity; and (ii) to suggests diversification of farm income by planting monospecific oilseed flower strips. [less ▲]

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See detailIncreasing plant functional diversity is not the key for supporting pollinators in wildflower strips
Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULiege; Piqueray, Julien; Hatt, Séverin ULiege et al

in Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment (2017), 249

Intensification of agriculture has been one of the major drivers for biodiversity loss in recent decades. Pollinators, which serve an important role in pollinating crops as well as wild plants, have shown ... [more ▼]

Intensification of agriculture has been one of the major drivers for biodiversity loss in recent decades. Pollinators, which serve an important role in pollinating crops as well as wild plants, have shown a decline in species richness. Flower strips can be used to support pollinators in agro-ecosystems, however the question remains as to how their design can be optimized in order to best benefit pollinators. Increasing plant species diversity has been shown to be beneficial for pollinators, and it is often suggested that functional traits are driving this relationship. Therefore, increasing plant functional diversity could be a tool to support pollinator abundance and diversity. As experimental evidence on this relationship is scarce, we developed a field study with experimental sown flower strips with four functional diversity levels, based on multiple flower traits and with equal plant species richness. We monitored vegetation development, as well as the flower-visiting pollinator community and their interaction networks with flowers. We were able to create a functional diversity gradient while controlling for plant species richness and evenness. However, in contrast to our expectations, pollinator species richness and evenness were not influenced by functional diversity, and increasing functional diversity even resulted in lower flower visitation rates. Network stability metrics showed no effect or negative relationships with functional diversity. We conclude that increasing functional diversity was not the key for supporting pollinators in wildflower strips. Our results also suggest that, for a constant amount of flower resources, increasing plant functional diversity and thus decreasing redundancy of potential pollinator feeding niches, decreases the amount of flower resources present per feeding niche. As pollinator species tended to have less overlap in their feeding niches in flower strips with increased functional diversity, this may lead to a reduction of flower resources available for pollinator species with a more specialized feeding niche. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional diversity and mowing regime of flower strips as tools to support pollinators and to suppress weeds
Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULiege

Doctoral thesis (2017)

Intensification of agriculture during past decades is one of the causes of biodiversity declines. Ecological intensification has been proposed as a more sustainable alternative of intensive agriculture ... [more ▼]

Intensification of agriculture during past decades is one of the causes of biodiversity declines. Ecological intensification has been proposed as a more sustainable alternative of intensive agriculture that should be able to fulfill worldwide demands of food, by optimizing ecosystem functions and services and reducing environmental impacts. One way to restore ecosystem functions and services in arable fields is creating flower strips in field margins. These flower strips enable wild plant communities to thrive and provide food and shelter to associated fauna. It is often suggested that increasing plant functional diversity could be a tool to optimize ecosystem functioning and ecosystem service delivery, and it could thus be a goal for the creation and management of flower strips. An example of ecosystem functioning studied in this manuscript, is the mutualistic interaction between plants and pollinators. To convince European farmers to implement flower strips, they are included in the subsidized Agri-Environment Schemes. However, there exists no clear appraisal of the pros and cons of flower strips for farmers. By systematically reviewing the literature for pros and cons, we found that most studies concerned agronomical and ecological processes related to flower strips, but few or no studies were dedicated to the social and economic aspects. Furthermore, pollination appears to be an important pro, and weed infestation a possible con, depending on flower strip creation and management. We focused on these two examples in the further study. We investigated (1) whether the increase of plant functional diversity can be used as tool to optimize flower strips for pollinators, (2) whether forb competition and adapting timing and frequency of mowing can be used as tools to limit weeds in flower strips, and (3) whether flower strips perform equally in supporting pollinators as the natural habitat for which they are thought to be a surrogate. To use functional diversity as a tool to optimize flower strips for pollinators, we first tested whether it is possible to create a flower strip with a desired functional diversity level. We sew experimental flower strips with increasing functional diversity, based on visual, morphological and phenological flower traits and surveyed the vegetation composition the first year after sowing. The sown gradient of functional diversity was present, but with lower absolute values due to unequal cover of sown species and due to the presence of spontaneous species. To test the effect on pollinator support, we monitored the plant-pollinator networks in the experimental strips during two years. In contrast to our expectations, pollinator species richness and evenness were not influenced by functional diversity, and increasing functional diversity even resulted in lower flower visitation rates. To investigate the effect of forb competition and timing and frequency of mowing on weed infestation, we created experimental flower strips either with grass and forb species in the seed mixture, either with only grass species. Three different mowing regimes were applied: summer mowing, autumn mowing and mowing both in summer and autumn. The cover of important weed, Cirsium arvense, was limited by adding forbs to the seed mixture and by mowing in summer or in summer and autumn. At last, by surveying plant-pollinator networks in perennial flower strips and natural hay meadows in the same landscape context, we observed that both the plant and the pollinator communities differed between the flower strips and the meadows. Perennial flower strips can thus be considered as a complementary habitat in the landscape and not a hay meadow surrogate. This study suggests that it is possible to manipulate the vegetation as well as infestation by certain weeds in flower strips by adapting the seed mixture and the mowing regime. However, to promote pollinators in flower strips, increasing plant functional diversity appears not to be the key, and the abundance of certain attractive plant species can be more important. Moreover our results suggest that pollinators perceived a lower redundancy of functional plant trait values when functional diversity was higher, as they had more separate feeding niches (less visited flower species in common). Our results also suggest that there could be a trade-off between the increase of functional trait diversity and the floral resource abundance per niche or functional trait combination. With the results of the tested flower strip creation and management methods and their effect on pollinator support and weed infestation, farmers and administrations can try to create and manage flower strips with the desired balance between pros and cons, and researchers can try to refine these methods and test the effects on other pros and cons. [less ▲]

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See detailInsect fatty acids: A comparison of lipids from three Orthopterans and Tenebrio molitor L. larvae
Paul, Aman ULiege; Frederich, Michel ULiege; Caparros Megido, Rudy ULiege et al

in Journal of Asia-Pacific Entomology (2017), 20(2), 337-340

In order to explore some potential insect sources of food lipids, the lipid compositions of three Orthopterans (Acheta domesticus, Conocephalus discolor and Chorthippus parallelus) were analyzed and ... [more ▼]

In order to explore some potential insect sources of food lipids, the lipid compositions of three Orthopterans (Acheta domesticus, Conocephalus discolor and Chorthippus parallelus) were analyzed and compared with those of Tenebrio molitor larvae. A. domesticus, Co. discolor, Ch. parallelus and T. molitor larvae were found to contain approximately 15%, 13%, 10% and 32% lipids on dry weight, respectively. The lipids from three Orthopterans contain much higher amounts of essential fatty acids than those of T. molitor larvae. The two Orthopterans of the suborder Ensifera i.e., A. domesticus and Co. discolor contain linoleic acid in major quantities, while Ch. parallelus of the suborder Caelifera, contain α-linolenic acid in major quantities. The consumption of linoleic and α-linolenic fatty acid is linked with numerous health promoting effects. The factors that contribute to differences in fatty acid profiles of these insects are being discussed. At last the nutritional parameters including polyunsaturated to saturated and omega 6 to omega 3 fatty acid ratios of these insect lipids are also being discussed to understand the potential role of these lipids in human nutrition. [less ▲]

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See detailZijn functioneel diversere bloemenstroken een hulp voor natuurlijke vijanden van bladluizen?
Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULiege

Article for general public (2017)

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See detailDo flower mixtures with high functional diversity enhance aphid predators in wildflower strips?
Hatt, Séverin ULiege; Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULiege; Chevalier Mendes Lopes, Thomas ULiege et al

in European Journal of Entomology (2017), 114

Among semi-natural elements in agricultural landscapes, wildflower strips sown at field margins or within fields represent potential habitats for the natural enemies of insect pests. As insects are ... [more ▼]

Among semi-natural elements in agricultural landscapes, wildflower strips sown at field margins or within fields represent potential habitats for the natural enemies of insect pests. As insects are sensitive to a variety of flower traits, we hypothesised that mixtures with high functional diversity attract and support a higher abundance and species richness of aphid flower visiting predators compared to mixtures with low functional diversity. During a field experiment, repeated over two years (2014 and 2015) in Gembloux (Belgium), aphid predators (i.e., lacewings, ladybeetles and hoverflies) were pan-trapped in five sown flower mixtures (including a control mixture, with three replicates of each mixture) of low to high functional diversity based on seven traits (i.e., flower colour, ultra-violet reflectance and pattern, blooming start and duration, height and flower class, primarily based on corolla morphology). In both years, flower species in the sown mixtures (i.e., sown and spontaneous flowers) were listed, and the realised functional diversity of each plot was calculated. Over the two years, an increase in functional diversity did not result in an increase in the abundance and richness of aphid predators. Moreover, ladybeetles, representing the majority of trapped predators, were more abundant in mixtures with very low or intermediary functional diversity at sowing, especially in 2014. We hypothesise that certain flower species, which were abundant in certain mixtures (and not in those exhibiting the highest functional diversity), attracted predators and were sufficiently represented to support them. Our results present novel information that could be used to the development of flower mixtures that provide effective ecosystem services, such as pest control. [less ▲]

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See detailEcosystem services in Wallonie ... What's up?
Maebe, Laura ULiege; Pipart, Nathalie; Dendoncker, Nicolas et al

Poster (2016, December 13)

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See detailNutritional Composition and Rearing Potential of the Meadow Grasshopper (Chorthippus parallelus Zetterstedt)
Paul, Aman ULiege; Frederich, Michel ULiege; Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULiege et al

in Journal of Asia-Pacific Entomology (2016), 19(4), 1111-1116

Insects, particularly those belonging to the family Acrididae (grasshoppers), are commonly consumed as human food in many parts of the world. Grasshoppers of the species Chorthippus parallelus are ... [more ▼]

Insects, particularly those belonging to the family Acrididae (grasshoppers), are commonly consumed as human food in many parts of the world. Grasshoppers of the species Chorthippus parallelus are abundantly found throughout Europe. However, these insects were not consumed by Europeans till now, but could possibly be used as human food, which is why we investigated their chemical composition. We found that they contain high level of proteins (69%), with an excellent amino acid profile and protein digestibility (97%). Furthermore, specimens of C. parallelus have an interesting fatty acids profile and minerals composition. Preliminary toxicity assessment indicates that these insects do not exhibit toxicity towards neutrophil cells (white blood cells). These data suggest that C. parallelus could be considered for human consumption. Rearing trials done during the study show that commercial rearing could be developed to produce sufficient biomass for sustaining human consumption. [less ▲]

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See detailPlant functional trait diversity in wildflower strips: the key to promote pollinators in agricultural landscapes?
Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULiege; Piqueray, Julien; Monty, Arnaud ULiege

Conference (2016, October 27)

Creating wildflower strips is often suggested as a tool to support pollinator diversity in agricultural landscapes and to promote crop pollination service. The choice of the plant species to sow in flower ... [more ▼]

Creating wildflower strips is often suggested as a tool to support pollinator diversity in agricultural landscapes and to promote crop pollination service. The choice of the plant species to sow in flower strips can influence the effectivity of the strips in supporting pollinators. While it has already been shown that increasing plant species diversity is beneficial for ecosystem services, it is often suggested that plant functional traits and functional trait diversity are the key for this relationship. We created a replicated field experiment with different levels of plant functional diversity in wildflower strips in Belgium to test the effect on the flower-visiting pollinator community. We sampled plant-pollinator interaction networks during 2 years and assessed how the plant functional diversity affected the network structure. Plant functional diversity did not have a clear effect on visiting pollinator species richness, however a different interaction pattern was observed with different functional diversity level. Pollinators in wildflower strips with higher functional diversity had less overlap in their ecological niche, while network stability and robustness for secondary extinctions were not affected. We discuss implications for wildflower strip design. [less ▲]

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See detailEcosystem services in Wallonie ... What's up?
Maebe, Laura ULiege; Nathalie, Pipart; Brogna, Delphine et al

Poster (2016, September 20)

In Wallonia, a growing amount of projects on ecosystem services (ES) are conducted. These projects implement the ES concept at different spatial scales (ranging from the country scale to the plot scale ... [more ▼]

In Wallonia, a growing amount of projects on ecosystem services (ES) are conducted. These projects implement the ES concept at different spatial scales (ranging from the country scale to the plot scale), focus on some particular ES or consider all of them and finally, rely on one or multiple valuation types (i.e. biophysical, social and economic). With their multiple dimensions they feed each other with reflexions and methods. The aim of the stand is to give an overview of these ongoing projects taking place in Wallonia. Their similarities and common objectives will be highlighted on posters while their specificities will be presented by means of games, activities, quiz, etc. We hope to stimulate discussions and debates on our methods and results, to foster networking and knowledge exchange. Hereunder, we give a short overview of these projects to give hints on the diversity addressed by our stand. At the Belgian scale, BELBEES, a project funded by BELSPO, aims to identify the factors responsible for the decline of wild bees. Different hypotheses are tested, including the impact of land-use changes and the reduction of floral resources availability at geographical and temporal scales. The results will allow tracking historical community-level changes in pollination service at a biogeographical scale. Such initiative is a step forward in the perspective of ecosystem service mapping. In Wallonia, various projects on ES are underway: Wal-ES, a federating platform between the Walloon administrations and the scientists, aims to create and disseminate decision support tools based on the ecosystem services concept. In order to build the common core for these tools, Wal-ES defines a conceptual framework, an integrated ecosystem services valuation framework and a database regrouping all the information needed to assess ES in Wallonia. This platform helps to conduct a practical application of its integrated ES valuation framework to land planning at a local scale. This application aims to define a methodology for impact assessment of land-consolidation plans based on ES while testing it on a case study covering three municipalities in Wallonia. LIFE IN QUARRIES aims to develop biodiversity and ecosystem services in Walloon active quarries. One of its actions is the assessment and the monitoring of ES provided by a quarry regarding the restoration, maintenance and management of the nature undertaken during the project. BIOECOSYS project is focused on qualitative and quantitative assessment of ecosystem services provided by grasslands according to their management and their territorial context. The field study aims to determine production services under different soils and climatic conditions while the goal of the regional study is the mapping of several ES (production and regulation services). Other projects focus on a more regional or local scale: The first one studies the impact of forest cover on regulating services at the regional scale. This study investigates the impact of forest cover on hydrological services (i.e. water supply, water damage mitigation) in terms of quantity, timing and quality. The methods studying the impact of forest cover on water quality and carbon storage regulation service will be presented as well as the results of the impact of forest cover on the quantity and timing aspects. Secondly, a PhD project is looking at sown wildflower strips in agricultural fields. In the project, it is tested whether increasing the functional diversity of the flower mixtures used in wildflower strips can be a tool to optimize pollination and biodiversity support services. Another PhD research project is underway, willing to explore the relationships between biodiversity, functional diversity and the delivery of ecosystem services (pest control and pollination) in agricultural landscapes. This project aims at identifying the role of landscape and its ecological infrastructures (mainly Agro-Environment Schemes) on the species and functional traits composition of different arthropods assemblages. We will then link these diversity patterns to the provisioning of the ecosystem services of interest. Ongoing work also addresses agricultural practices, by analysing the contribution of agroecological farming systems to the delivery of ecosystem services. This project relies on an integrated valuation including both a biophysical and a social valuation. Focusing on the same fields as the above project, this one attempts to develop an innovative method to assess ecosystem services in agricultural fields by means of unmanned aerial vehicles (drones). [less ▲]

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See detailFarms For Future: building tomorrow's agriculture
Pécheur, Emilie ULiege; Maebe, Laura ULiege; Boeraeve, Fanny ULiege et al

Poster (2016, May 20)

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See detailGrasshoppers as a food source? A review
Paul, Aman ULiege; Frederich, Michel ULiege; Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULiege et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement (2016), 20(AgricultureIsLife), 337-352

Description of the subject. Current trends suggest an increasing future demand for conventional meats, which indicates a strong need to shift this dependency to other alternative protein sources such as ... [more ▼]

Description of the subject. Current trends suggest an increasing future demand for conventional meats, which indicates a strong need to shift this dependency to other alternative protein sources such as insects. Literature. From a nutritional point of view, of all the insects consumed globally, grasshoppers are particularly important as a human food. Data from the literature regarding the nutrient composition, amino acid profile, fatty acid profile, mineral composition and vitamin content of grasshoppers as reviewed in this paper, suggest that a number of grasshopper species are a good source of nutrients. It also highlights some of the health related aspects that might arise from the consumption of grasshoppers, mostly linked to agricultural practices and the allergic response of sensitive individuals. The paper also summarizes some religious, social and economic factors that are associated with grasshopper consumption. Conclusions. The success of introducing grasshoppers as a novel food in western countries depends on changes in consumer attitudes. It would be interesting to develop food products derived from grasshoppers in a form acceptable to consumers. Furthermore, it is important to explore the food potential of some grasshopper species native to western countries and to develop their rearing methodologies to enhance availability. [less ▲]

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See detailPros and cons of flowers strips for farmers. A review
Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULiege; Hatt, Séverin ULiege; Paul, Aman ULiege et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement (2016), 20(s1), 225-235

Description of the subject. To counteract environmental problems due to agricultural intensification, European farmers can apply agri-environmental schemes in their fields. Flower strips are one example ... [more ▼]

Description of the subject. To counteract environmental problems due to agricultural intensification, European farmers can apply agri-environmental schemes in their fields. Flower strips are one example of these schemes, with the aim of supporting biodiversity, leading to an increase in “useful” species groups such as pollinators for crop pollination and natural enemies for pest control. However, to our knowledge, a complete appraisal of the pros and cons of flower strips, from a farmer’s point of view, does not yet exist. It is proposed that better and more complete information could increase the adoption and implementation of such agri-environmental schemes. Objectives. This study aims 1) to assess the pros and cons of flower strips, from a farmer’s point of view, and 2) to highlight the knowledge gaps that exist in the scientific literature, for the different types of pros and cons. Method. We listed the different components of the appraisal of pros and cons and conducted a systematic screening of the scientific literature on flower strips and these components. Results. The largest part of the 31 selected studies was concerning agronomical and ecological processes, such as pollination and animal pest control. Most of them indicated positive effects of flower strips. For many components of the appraisal, mostly economic and social ones, few or no studies were found. Conclusions. While a positive balance of pros and cons, from a farmer’s point of view, came from our literature screening, large research gaps still remain and more research is required, especially in the economic and social components of the evaluation. [less ▲]

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See detailWildflowers sown at field margins have positive and negative effects on pests and parasitoids
Hatt, Séverin ULiege; Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULiege; Chevalier Mendes Lopes, Thomas ULiege et al

Conference (2015, September 03)

Wildflower strips are sown at field margins throughout Europe to support insect conservation in agricultural areas. Among other insects, parasitoids may favor a biological regulation of pests. On an ... [more ▼]

Wildflower strips are sown at field margins throughout Europe to support insect conservation in agricultural areas. Among other insects, parasitoids may favor a biological regulation of pests. On an experimental field of the research platform AgricultureIsLife in Gembloux (University of Liège, Belgium), three replications of five wildflower seed mixtures were sown in strips adjacent to crops in spring 2013. Insect pests and their parasitoids were pan-trapped in spring 2014 in both wildflower strips and oilseed rape crops and identified at the species level. Flower species and cover were monitored in the strips using 1 m² quadrats, before mowing. Meligethes spp. were found abundantly in crops when oilseed rape was blooming. Meligethes’ parasitoids occurred later and their abundance was positively correlated with that of Meligethes in the flower strips. At the crop ripening stage, weevils Ceutorhynchus spp. occurred and were followed by an increase in abundance of their parasitoids in both crops and flowers. Positive as well as negative correlations were found between the abundance of these pests, their parasitoids and different flower species blooming at this time. The link between these results with flower species’ functional traits will be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailDes bandes fleuries pour la lutte biologique : état des lieux, limites et perspectives en Wallonie – Une synthèse bibliographique.
Hatt, Séverin ULiege; Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULiege; Bodson, Bernard ULiege et al

in Entomologie Faunistique (2015), 68

Managing field margins takes part of the Agri-Environmental Measures supported by the European Union in Wallonia. Among possible infrastructures, wildflower strips are known to conserve a wide diversity ... [more ▼]

Managing field margins takes part of the Agri-Environmental Measures supported by the European Union in Wallonia. Among possible infrastructures, wildflower strips are known to conserve a wide diversity of insects, including natural enemies that can be mobilized to biologically control pests. However, the efficiency of pest control is not guaranteed. It depends mainly on the ability of flowers to attract natural enemies at the right time and to keep them in this environment while favoring their migration into adjacent crops. A reflection on the composition of the floral mixtures may optimize their capacity in biological control. In this context, this review paper put forward the interest of considering functional traits of flowers and presents the concept of functional diversity. Furthermore, the sown perennial wildflower strips should be maintained by regular mowing. However, mowing affects both insect and plant populations due to momentary destruction of the habitat. An appropriate management of field margins is therefore needed to optimize the pest control service provided. [less ▲]

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See detailFood Compounds from Meadow Grasshoppers
Paul, Aman ULiege; Frederich, Michel ULiege; Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULiege et al

Poster (2015, March 15)

Eating insects as food, particularly grasshopper is practiced in many cultures throughout the world. Meadow grasshopper (Chorthippus parallelus) is commonly found in Europe and some part of Asia. It is ... [more ▼]

Eating insects as food, particularly grasshopper is practiced in many cultures throughout the world. Meadow grasshopper (Chorthippus parallelus) is commonly found in Europe and some part of Asia. It is already known that grasshoppers of Chorthippus species are consumed as food in countries such as Thailand. With the aim of evaluating the nutritional potential of this insect species the proximate nutritional composition of grasshoppers caught from the local fields was realized. Besides this, the fatty acid profile of extracted lipids, amino acid profile and mineral composition of the insect was also revealed. Results suggest that meadow grasshopper is an excellent source of protein and essential amino acids. Lipids extracted from the grasshopper have an interesting fatty acid composition. Also the grasshopper contains some minerals that are important for body. With such protein content, amino acid profile, fatty acid profile of the lipids and mineral content this grasshopper species could present an interesting alternate to conventional protein sources. [less ▲]

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See detailWildflower strips for crop protection: What do we know ? What should we know ?
Hatt, Séverin ULiege; Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULiege; Bodson, Bernard ULiege et al

Poster (2015, January 30)

Wildflower strips (WFS) are known to support the conservation of a large diversity of insects and thus natural enemies (i.e. predators and parasitoids) that can control pests. However, the conclusions of ... [more ▼]

Wildflower strips (WFS) are known to support the conservation of a large diversity of insects and thus natural enemies (i.e. predators and parasitoids) that can control pests. However, the conclusions of studies looking at the efficiency of WFS to control pests are not unanimous. Indeed, the enhancement of pest control seems to depend on (1) the ability of flowers to attract the natural enemies at the right moment and (2) the capacity of natural enemies to migrate into the adjacent crops to attack pests. Therefore, constituting appropriate flower mixes may be an essential lever to enhance the efficiency of pest control. In this context, using functional diversity is promising. To our knowledge, few studies have tested the impact of the functional diversity of a flower mix on insect abundance and diversity and the control of pests. Through this contribution, the insect diversity and abundance found to be associated with the different kinds of WFS and management applied will be discussed, as well as the further research needed. [less ▲]

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See detailLinking bees and flowers: mutualistic interaction networks to study ecosystem functioning
Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULiege; Monty, Arnaud ULiege

Poster (2015, January 30)

In recent years, much attention is going to pollinators, as they are important for the increasing food production while being threatened by agricultural intensification and other environmental drivers ... [more ▼]

In recent years, much attention is going to pollinators, as they are important for the increasing food production while being threatened by agricultural intensification and other environmental drivers. While honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) are generalist according to their flower preferences, wild pollinators’ flower preferences can go from generalist to very specialist. The same goes for plant species, which can be generalist or specialist in the pollinator species they need to get pollinated. The combination of a set of generalist and specialist plant species with a pollinator community consisting of generalists and specialists in a certain habitat, results in an interaction network between pollinators and the visited plant flowers. Studying this mutualistic interaction network is a time-consuming method, but can provide valuable data to calculate indicators of ecosystem functioning. One of the important conclusions that came already out of studies applying this method is that pollination systems are often more generalized than thought based on pollination syndromes. This poster will explore the method of studying mutualistic interaction networks with a focus on the sampling protocol, the indicators that can be derived from the data and their meaning. [less ▲]

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See detailDo wildflower strips favor insect pest populations at field margins ?
Hatt, Séverin ULiege; Uyttenbroeck, Roel ULiege; Chevalier Mendes Lopes, Thomas ULiege et al

in Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia (2015)

Reducing pesticide use is one the major issues of today’s agriculture. Among other possibilities, attracting and conserving pest natural enemies in agricultural landscapes by providing them habitats is ... [more ▼]

Reducing pesticide use is one the major issues of today’s agriculture. Among other possibilities, attracting and conserving pest natural enemies in agricultural landscapes by providing them habitats is promising. Wildflower strips (WFS) sown at field margins are one of these potential habitats. They are known to attract and conserve a large diversity of insects, as they provide them food resources such as pollen and nectar, as well as shelter and overwintering sites. However, the risk of attracting insect pests at field margins may represent an obstacle to their adoption by farmers. Conversely, it would be interesting if such WFS could play the role of pest trap crops. In an experimental field sown with WFS intercropped with oilseed rape (OSR) (Brassica napus L.), its coleopteran pests were trapped in both WFS and OSR using yellow pan traps between April and June 2014. More than 130 000 Meligethes spp., Ceutorhynchus spp. and Psylliodes chrysocephalla (L.) adults were trapped. Meligethes spp., Ceutorhynchus spp. were significantly more abundant in the OSR compared with WFS when adults emerged and populations reached their abundance peak. Before and between these periods, the few adults trapped were significantly more abundant in the WFS compared with the OSR. Concerning P. chrysocephala, too few individuals were caught for analysis. Results showed that OSR was more attractive than WFS when coleopteran pests were abundant. In this study, WFS sown for insect conservation may neither favour insect pest conservation at field margin, nor be considered as trap crops. [less ▲]

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