References of "Uyttenbroeck, Roel"
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See detailIdentification of flower functional traits affecting abundance of generalist predators in perennial multiple species wildflower strips
Hatt, Séverin ULiege; Uyttenbroeck, Roel; Lopes, Thomas et al

in Arthropod-Plant Interactions (2019)

In agricultural fields, wildflower strips can be sown to enhance conservation biological control of insect pests. However, issues remain regarding the composition of flower mixtures to effectively attract ... [more ▼]

In agricultural fields, wildflower strips can be sown to enhance conservation biological control of insect pests. However, issues remain regarding the composition of flower mixtures to effectively attract and support large communities of natural enemies. Trait-based approaches are promising for this purpose. In the present study, conducted in an agricultural field of Belgium in 2014 and 2015, 15 flower mixtures were considered to explore the relation between the abundance of trapped generalist predators (i.e. lacewings [Neuroptera: Chrysopidae], ladybeetles [Coleoptera: Coccinellidae] and hoverflies [Diptera: Syrphidae]) and the community-weighted means of seven flower traits. Through a redundancy analysis, it was found that the presence/absence of flower ultra-violet pattern and the morphology of the corolla (that determines the accessibility of floral resources) were the traits that significantly affected the abundance of the generalist predators in the flower mixtures. The ladybeetles Harmonia axyridis and Propylea quatuordecimpunctata as well as the lacewings Chrysoperla carnea were more abundant in mixtures with a high cover of flowers showing an ultra-violet pattern, while the opposite was observed for the ladybeetle Coccinella septempunctata. As for hoverflies, Episyrphus balteatus and Eupeodes corollae were more abundant in mixtures with a high cover of flowers with open nectar. These results bring new knowledge regarding how a range of natural enemy species reacts to flower cues in diversified plant communities and should help in elaborating flower mixtures that enhance conservation biological control. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of mining spoils to determine the best substrate for rehabilitating limestone quarries by favoring native grassland species over invasive plants
Pitz, Carline ULiege; Mahy, Grégory ULiege; Harzé, Mélanie et al

in Ecological Engineering (2019), 127

Habitats being restored in Belgian quarries are easily invaded by non-native plant species, which can hamper the germination and development of vegetation deemed to be of high conservation value ... [more ▼]

Habitats being restored in Belgian quarries are easily invaded by non-native plant species, which can hamper the germination and development of vegetation deemed to be of high conservation value. Substrates of terraces created when mining limestone quarries could be inhospitable to native plants. However, they can provide opportunities for establishing specific vegetation, such as dry calcareous grasslands. Applying suitable mining spoils could be a cost-effective way to provide growing substrate when restoring limestone terraces. We assessed the efficacy of using mining spoils, collected on-site, as a potential growing substrate (bedding material). We tested gravely limestone (product of on-site mining activities), limestone dust (by-product), and no addition (bare limestone bedrock) to determine which was best for favoring the growth of native, dry calcareous grassland species and discourage the growth of two non-native invasive species that commonly invade altered mining sites: Buddleja davidii Franch and Senecio inaequidens DC. In a field experiment (in two quarries), we studied short-term (2 y) growth response of native and invasive species after sowing three seed mixtures of native grassland species, varying in functional diversity (and one no-sowing control treatment), all treatments subjected to competitive pressure exerted by invasive species. Percent cover of native and invasive species, species abundance and reproductive characteristics of the invasive species were monitored during 2-y. Native grasslands coverage was low on all substrate types, demonstrating how slowly calcareous grasslands species establish in such harsh substrate conditions. However, type of substrate did show a significant relationship with plant abundance, with limestone dust being the most beneficial for native species establishment (coverage). Although limestone dust appeared to be the best option for restoring grassland species to limestone quarries (based on its low cost, wide availability, and potential to support native species), it was also likely to support the two invasive species. Functional diversity of the seed mixture had no consistent effect. Our study shows the importance of identifying the most appropriate substrate to both establish calcareous grasslands and resist invasive species. This approach provides insights into developing strategies to conserve biodiversity in industrial and agricultural landscapes with limestone quarries. [less ▲]

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See detailFlower Strips in Wheat Intercropping System: Effect on Pollinator Abundance and Diversity in Belgium
Amy, Clara ULiege; Noël, Grégoire ULiege; Hatt, Séverin ULiege et al

in Insects (2018), 9(3), 114

The decline of pollinators in agricultural areas has been observed for some decades, this being partly due to landscape simplification in intensive agrosystems. Diversifying agricultural landscapes by ... [more ▼]

The decline of pollinators in agricultural areas has been observed for some decades, this being partly due to landscape simplification in intensive agrosystems. Diversifying agricultural landscapes by sowing flower strips within fields could reduce these adverse effects on biodiversity. In this context, the study presented here aimed at assessing and comparing the abundance and diversity of bees (Hymenoptera: Anthophila) and hoverflies (Diptera: Syrphidae) found and visiting flowers in three types of flower strips in Belgium: (i) a mixture of 11 wild flowers, (ii) a monofloral strip of Dimorphoteca pluvialis (Asteraceae) and (iii) a monofloral strip of Camelina sativa (Brassicaceae), where the last two are considered to be intercrops since they are valuable on the market, all sown within a field of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Pollinators were captured with pan traps and by netting in standardised transects from May to July 2017. One-thousand one-hundred and eighty-four individuals belonging to 43 bee species and 18 hoverfly species were collected. Significant differences in hoverfly diversity were found between the different flower strips. The multifloral treatment supported a greater diversity of syrphid species. Various pollinator species visited the different flowers composing the mixture and also D. pluvialis. The pollinator community proved to be predominantly generalist, with the exception of an oligolectic species in Belgium, Andrena nitidiuscula. Moreover, the three tested flower strips were effective in attracting hoverflies, among them natural enemies of insect pests. This study opens new perspectives in the design of intercropping systems with flower strips towards the design of sustainable agro-ecosystems. Improving economic profitability of sowing flower strips could encourage farmers to diversify their agricultural systems and foster conservation biology strategies. [less ▲]

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See detailWalloon researchers on ecosystem services... What's up?
Maebe, Laura ULiege; Authelet, Manon ULiege; Breyne, Johanna ULiege et al

Poster (2017, December 12)

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