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See detail"A Growth to Understanding": An Interview with Caryl Phillips about Biographical Fiction
Ledent, Bénédicte ULiege; Tunca, Daria ULiege; Phillips, Caryl

in Journal of Commonwealth Literature (in press)

Starting from the recognition of a biographical impulse in the work of Caryl Phillips, this interview focuses on his practice of biographical fiction. Among the issues raised are the increased popularity ... [more ▼]

Starting from the recognition of a biographical impulse in the work of Caryl Phillips, this interview focuses on his practice of biographical fiction. Among the issues raised are the increased popularity of life writing, the tension between fact and fiction at the heart of biographical narratives, the linguistic exactitude involved in focusing on historical characters, the role of research in the exploration of human lives, and the importance of emotional truth in novels that deal with famous individuals. This conversation sheds light on Phillips’s specific approach to biofiction, particularly in his novels Dancing in the Dark (2005) and A View of the Empire at Sunset (2018), while also providing readers with a more general reflection on the genre in the postcolonial field. [less ▲]

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See detailIlluminating Lives: The Biographical Impulse in Postcolonial Literatures
Ledent, Bénédicte ULiege; Tunca, Daria ULiege

in Journal of Commonwealth Literature (in press)

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See detailReview of A Companion to Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, ed. by Ernest N. Emenyonu
Tunca, Daria ULiege

in Journal of Postcolonial Writing (2019), 55(1), 144-145

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See detailChimamanda Ngozi Adichie: Portrait of the Artist as a Feminist Fashion Icon
Tunca, Daria ULiege

Scientific conference (2018, November 12)

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (3 ULiège)
See detailIndexicality and the Ethno-text: The Works of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Tunca, Daria ULiege

Conference (2018, October 22)

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See detailFrom Autogenealogy to Controversy: The Facebook Notes of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Tunca, Daria ULiege

Conference (2018, May 25)

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See detailThe Postcolonial Biographical Novel: Aesthetics and Ideologies
Ledent, Bénédicte ULiege; Tunca, Daria ULiege

Conference (2018, January)

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See detailChimamanda Ngozi Adichie as Chinua Achebe's (Unruly) Literary Daughter: The Past, Present, and Future of "Adichebean" Criticism
Tunca, Daria ULiege

in Research in African Literatures (2018), 49(4), 107-126

This essay focuses on the—already much-discussed—literary relationship between Nigerian writers Chinua Achebe and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Following an introduction on the state of what the article calls ... [more ▼]

This essay focuses on the—already much-discussed—literary relationship between Nigerian writers Chinua Achebe and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Following an introduction on the state of what the article calls, somewhat tongue-in-cheek, "Adichebean" criticism, the essay investigates how Adichie's ambiguous interventions on the topic of her affiliation with Achebe have defined her own literary identity but also, more generally, how her declarations may provide food for thought in regard to the wider field of contemporary African writing and its criticism. One of the central points developed in the essay is that existing comparative studies of Achebe's and Adichie's works have tended to focus on particular topics and use similar methods of inquiry and that further lines of investigation need to be pursued if we are to build a nuanced and comprehensive picture of the connections and divergences between Achebe and his increasingly "unruly" literary offspring. It is to this "rebelliousness" that the final part of the essay attends by appraising the possible significance of Adichie's oppositional stance in her two lukewarm assessments of Achebe's final opus, his nonfictional There Was a Country: A Personal History of Biafra (2012). [less ▲]

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See detail"Madness is rampant on this island": Writing Altered States in Anglophone Caribbean Literature
Ledent, Bénédicte ULiege; O'Callaghan, Evelyn; Tunca, Daria ULiege

in Ledent, Bénédicte; O'Callaghan, Evelyn; Tunca, Daria (Eds.) Madness in Anglophone Caribbean Literature: On the Edge (2018)

As outlined in this introductory chapter, this collection explores how Caribbean writers, including diasporic ones, accommodate altered states of consciousness, such as madness, and thereby reconfigure a ... [more ▼]

As outlined in this introductory chapter, this collection explores how Caribbean writers, including diasporic ones, accommodate altered states of consciousness, such as madness, and thereby reconfigure a space long constructed as a zone of degeneration and derangement. Taking as its starting point the pervasive representation of various forms of mental illness, breakdown and psychopathology in Caribbean literature, this introduction surveys the sparse extant criticism, and invites us to reassess the slippery meaning of such words as “mad”, “madness,” and semantically associated lexicon. This chapter also outlines how, dialoguing with texts and theories concerning affective and mental states that operate on planes other than the rational and the material, the contributors in three focused sections explore a richly evocative and often contradictory phenomenon, culturally constructed and often eluding precise depictions. The chapter closes by sketching other avenues for future research. [less ▲]

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See detailMadness in Anglophone Caribbean Literature: On the Edge
Ledent, Bénédicte ULiege; O'Callaghan, Evelyn; Tunca, Daria ULiege

Book published by Palgrave (2018)

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See detailReview of Kai Mikkonen's Narrative Paths: African Travel in Modern Fiction and Nonfiction
Tunca, Daria ULiege

in Literary Research (2018), (34), 149-153

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See detailThe Danger of a Single Short Story: Reality, Fiction, and Metafiction in Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s "Jumping Monkey Hill"
Tunca, Daria ULiege

in Journal of Postcolonial Writing (2018), 54(1),

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s short story “Jumping Monkey Hill” was inspired by its author’s experience at the inaugural workshop of the Caine Prize for African Writing in 2003, during which, the writer says ... [more ▼]

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s short story “Jumping Monkey Hill” was inspired by its author’s experience at the inaugural workshop of the Caine Prize for African Writing in 2003, during which, the writer says, she was faced with the lustful and patronizing attitude of the then-administrator of the award. Adichie’s piece, by virtue of being a short story about writing itself, is a so-called “metafictional” text. It is on this self-reflexive quality that this essay focuses. More precisely, the article examines the interaction between reality and fiction in Adichie’s story, paying particular attention to the ways in which the text uses techniques of mise en abyme to comment on gender subjection, colonially tinged condescension, and resistance to both of these forms of oppression. Ultimately, the essay argues that “Jumping Monkey Hill” can be read as a literary manifesto that incarnates its own theorization, a conclusion that is, however, shown to be problematic in more than one respect. [less ▲]

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See detailMicrostylistics: Examining the Revised Short Stories of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Tunca, Daria ULiege

Conference (2017, July 19)

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See detailThe Poetics of (In)visibility: A Stylistic Analysis of Caryl Phillips' Foreigners: Three English Lives
Tunca, Daria ULiege

in Ariel: A Review of International English Literature (2017), 48(3-4), 159-186

Caryl Phillips' multi-voiced texts have often been studied through the lens of Bakhtinian polyphony. In this essay I focus on the volume of fictionalized biographies Foreigners: Three English Lives (2007 ... [more ▼]

Caryl Phillips' multi-voiced texts have often been studied through the lens of Bakhtinian polyphony. In this essay I focus on the volume of fictionalized biographies Foreigners: Three English Lives (2007) to demonstrate that polyphony in Phillips' work resides not only in the structural confrontation of characters' and narrators' voices but also in the subtle inscription of the implied author's subjectivity within his texts. Borrowing methods from the discipline of stylistics, I first establish through a focus on the use of adjectives and modality (that is, grammatical means indicating how speakers position themselves in relation to propositions) in the opening section of Foreigners, "Dr Johnson's Watch," how the first-person narrator gradually transitions from tentativeness to self-confidence. This change enables the implied author, on the one hand, to expose the thwarted logic of the colonially tinted discourse of his eighteenth-century narrator and, on the other, to reflect on the process of ideological encoding inherent in the writing of historiography. Such an investigation based on modality further allows me to challenge the critical consensus that the second section of the book, "Made in Wales," is a straightforward factual account. I suggest that the story of the rise and fall of mixed-race boxer Randolph Turpin is in fact a highly polyphonic narrative that features increasingly marked clashes in modality and point of view. These clashes, I argue, draw attention to the construction of historiographical discourse deceptively made to appear so commonsense by the narrator of "Dr Johnson's Watch." [less ▲]

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See detailReview of Madhu Krishnan's Contemporary African Literature in English: Global Locations, Postcolonial Identifications
Tunca, Daria ULiege

in Journal of Postcolonial Writing (2017), 53(5), 617-618

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See detailIntersections on the "Map of Art": Metaphor in Ben Okri's Dangerous Love and Wilson Harris's The Mask of the Beggar
Tunca, Daria ULiege

in Collier, Gordon; Davis, Geoffrey V.; Delrez, Marc (Eds.) et al The Cross-Cultural Legacy: Critical and Creative Writings in Memory of Hena Maes-Jelinek (2017)

Inspired by the work and legacy of Hena Maes-Jelinek, this essay proposes a parallel reading of Ben Okri’s Dangerous Love (1996) and Wilson Harris’s The Mask of the Beggar (2003), focusing on the novels’ ... [more ▼]

Inspired by the work and legacy of Hena Maes-Jelinek, this essay proposes a parallel reading of Ben Okri’s Dangerous Love (1996) and Wilson Harris’s The Mask of the Beggar (2003), focusing on the novels’ use of metaphor. More precisely, the article relies on conceptual metaphor theory to explore how these two Künstlerromane conceptualize the artistic development of their respective protagonists. It is argued that, while both novels use spatial metaphors to present art as a journey undertaken by their artist-hero, Okri privileges forward motion on the creative path, whereas Harris additionally foregrounds movement towards the travelling artist. In doing so, the Guyanese writer defeats readers’ instinctive search for a sense of direction on the “map of art,” a move that is emblematic of the elusive dialectic at the heart of his work. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Chika Unigwe Bibliography
Tunca, Daria ULiege

Textual, factual or bibliographical database (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (5 ULiège)
See detailRepetition and Negation as Dialogic Devices in Caryl Phillips's "Northern Lights"
Tunca, Daria ULiege

Conference (2016, July 28)

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See detail"Living on the Edge of Death": Irony in Chris Abani's Song for Night
Tunca, Daria ULiege

Conference (2016, April 07)

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (2 ULiège)