References of "Tine, François Dassise Kheyane"
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See detailTranslation as Recreation: Interrogating Heteronormativity in Emma Donoghue’s “The Tale of the Rose”
Tine, François Dassise Kheyane ULiege

in Bridges: An African Journal of English Studies (2018)

For a long time, translation has been considered as the faithful rendering of a source text into a target text, taking into account the linguistic and grammatical rules in the target language. Nowadays ... [more ▼]

For a long time, translation has been considered as the faithful rendering of a source text into a target text, taking into account the linguistic and grammatical rules in the target language. Nowadays, thanks to the cultural turn initiated by scholars such as Susan Bassnett and André Lefevere, translation is no longer seen as such. Rather, it is seen as the very negotiation of different cultural aspects in the act of translation to offer a renewed version that raises expectations for a new set of readers. Thus, translation intends to contribute in the remaking, remodeling and refashioning or better, as Lefevere calls it, “rewriting” of a source text. In this sense, Irish writer Emma Donoghue’s “recreation” of the tale “Beauty and the Beast” falls within this category inasmuch as it can be considered as a ‘rewriting’ in Lefevere’s terms, though, of course, it is clearly distinct from translation per se. This paper analyzes how Donoghue’s creative and innovative rewriting of the fairy tale “Beauty and the Beast” challenges its previous versions by including in her narrative same-sex desires and lesbianism. I shall argue that Donoghue’s rewriting, her recreation, and retelling of the tale “Beauty and the Beast” in “The Tale of the Rose” are aimed at questioning notions of heteronormativity and heteropatriarchal assumptions that women can only be safe and happy in a heterosexual marriage. [less ▲]

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See detail“‘Gratia Lacrymarum’?’ From Trauma to Tears: Representations and Functions of Crying in Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, Home and God Help the Child”
Tine, François Dassise Kheyane ULiege

Conference (2018, November 24)

Abstract: Though Toni Morrison’s oeuvre has received a breadth of criticism, critics seem to disregard the representation of tears in her work. In this paper, I examine the metaphorical meanings and ... [more ▼]

Abstract: Though Toni Morrison’s oeuvre has received a breadth of criticism, critics seem to disregard the representation of tears in her work. In this paper, I examine the metaphorical meanings and functions of literary tears in Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, Home, and God Help the Child and argue that Morrison’s literary portrayal of crying is neither meant to thrill the reader nor to create sensation. Rather, Morrison invites readers to regard tears as the direct outcome and result of traumatic encounters and shameful life-threatening events her characters endure. Thus, this paper combines and seeks to bridge the gap between literary discussions of trauma (developed by Laurie Vickroy, J. Brooks Bouson etc.) and the theorization of “tear” in the field of psychology (Tom Lutz, William H. Frey, and Judith K. Nelson among many others). By featuring the characters’ tears in these novels, I explore how Toni Morrison renders the difficulties experienced by African Americans as they attempt to redefine and reconstruct their split identities in a land of deep racial animus. More significantly, in doing so, I contend that such representations of tears are fruitful tropes through which Morrison addresses issues of family dislocations, ruptured communities, and socioeconomic marginalization. In this paper, I aim to deconstruct received understanding of crying often associated with (female) weakness and idealized notions of crying as excessive and/or uncontrolled emotionality. Instead, in my talk, I attempt to conceptualize tears in Morrison’s works as means for self-awareness that can enable true spiritual growth. [less ▲]

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See detailForced Displacement and Its Traumatic Effects in Toni Morrison's Home and A Mercy
Tine, François Dassise Kheyane ULiege

Conference (2018, November 17)

Abstract Title: Forced Displacement and Its Traumatic Effects in Toni Morrison’s Home and A Mercy In my talk, I explore how Morrison’s A Mercy and Home revisit the theme of mother-daughter relationship as ... [more ▼]

Abstract Title: Forced Displacement and Its Traumatic Effects in Toni Morrison’s Home and A Mercy In my talk, I explore how Morrison’s A Mercy and Home revisit the theme of mother-daughter relationship as well as issues of homelessness and traumatic displacements. I will begin my talk by demonstrating how Morrison underscores African Americans’ objectification and addresses the legacies of traumatic displacements because of racist practices and slavery. In Home, I explore how Morrison portrays the difficulties experienced by African Americans as they attempt to re-envision and reconstruct the concept of home in a land of deep racial animus. Because of Jim Crow practices in the American South that give rise to everyday indignities, brutal violence, and traumatic displacements, the correlation with home and the South is only a vague promise for many black Americans. Using postcolonial and trauma theories (Homi K. Bhabha, Kelly Oliver, J. Brooks Bouson and Evelyn Jaffe Schreiber) I attempt to show how mobility is used to address issues of family dislocations, motherlessness, ruptured communities, and socioeconomic marginalization. By featuring Frank Money’s and Florens’s displacements, I argue that home must be regarded as an imagined ideal that enables healing and self-validation. Central to this is the deconstruction of idealized notions of manhood and feminine subjectivity that impede self-awareness and true spiritual growth. [less ▲]

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See detailHome and Trauma in Toni Morrison's Fiction: A Study of God Help the Child, Home, A Mercy, Paradise and Love
Tine, François Dassise Kheyane ULiege

Conference (2018, May 16)

Présentation de poster sur le sujet de ma thèse (communication orale)

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See detail“‘Let’s Go Home’: Spiritual Journey to Home and Self-Recovery” in Toni Morrison’s Home
Tine, François Dassise Kheyane ULiege

Conference (2017, March 16)

Toni Morrison’s novel Home narrates Frank Money’s journey to save his unsuspecting sister, Cee, from her employer, a physician who uses her body as a scientific experiment to prove his racist, eugenist ... [more ▼]

Toni Morrison’s novel Home narrates Frank Money’s journey to save his unsuspecting sister, Cee, from her employer, a physician who uses her body as a scientific experiment to prove his racist, eugenist beliefs. In the process, it recounts Frank’s own difficulties as he copes with his traumatic experiences as a result of his involvement in the Korean War. In my talk, I explore how Toni Morrison’s Home portrays the difficulties experienced by African Americans as they attempt to re-envision and reconstruct the concept of home in a land of deep racial animus. Because of Jim Crow practices that give rise to everyday indignities, brutal violence, and traumatic displacements, home is only a vague promise for many black Americans. I will begin my talk by demonstrating how mobility is used to address issues of family dislocations, ruptured communities, and socioeconomic marginalization. By featuring Frank Money’s frequent displacements after his return from the Korean War in the 1950s, I argue that rather than home as a specific geographical or physical location, it must be regarded as an imagined ideal that enables healing and self-validation. Central to this is the deconstruction of idealized notions of manhood that impede self-awareness and true spiritual growth. [less ▲]

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