References of "Storme, Jean-Yves"
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See detailLipid analysis on a putative early land plant and its matrix: Preliminary results
Versteegh, Gerath J.M.; Cascales-Miñana, Borja ULiege; Gerrienne, Philippe ULiege et al

Conference (2015, October)

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See detailRaman characterization of the UV-protective pigment gloeocapsin and its role in the survival of cyanobacteria
Storme, Jean-Yves ULiege; Golubic, Stjepko; Wilmotte, Annick ULiege et al

Conference (2015, August 21)

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See detailContribution of cyanobacteria to the building of travertines in a calcareous stream
Wilmotte, Annick ULiege; Golubic, Stjepko; Kleinteich, Julia et al

Poster (2015, August 03)

The ambient temperature travertine deposits of the calcareous Hoyoux River (Modave, Belgium) and several tributaries are organized and promoted by the filamentous cyanobacterium identified by its ... [more ▼]

The ambient temperature travertine deposits of the calcareous Hoyoux River (Modave, Belgium) and several tributaries are organized and promoted by the filamentous cyanobacterium identified by its morphotype and ecological properties as Phormidium cf. incrustatum. A combination of techniques was used to study this biotope: physico-chemical parameters and CO2 measurements, Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy, RAMAN microspectroscopy. A molecular diversity study with pyrosequencing of the cyanobacterial 16S rRNA is in progress. A potential candidate was isolated in culture. [less ▲]

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See detailCyanobacteria - the constructors of travertines?
Kleinteich, Julia; Stelmach Pessi, Igor ULiege; Velazquez, David et al

Conference (2015, February)

Cyanobacteria are participating in carbonate build-up and travertine formation in the Belgian river Hoyoux and its tributaries. In this study, we sampled calcareous material from travertines and oncoliths ... [more ▼]

Cyanobacteria are participating in carbonate build-up and travertine formation in the Belgian river Hoyoux and its tributaries. In this study, we sampled calcareous material from travertines and oncoliths from four sampling sites on the Hoyoux river and Triffoy brook. In addition, the water chemistry was determined. The structure of the material was analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy and Raman microscopy (?°. The dominant cyanobacterial species was isolated and identified on the basis of microscopic observation and amplification of the 16S-ITS fragment as Phormidium sp., likely functioning as the ‘architect’ of the travertine system. In order to describe the full diversity of the travertine system and to discriminate between the active fraction and inactive or dead organic matter, DNA as well as RNA was extracted from the travertine material, amplified using cyanobacteria specific primers and sequenced by 454 pyrosequencing. To detect seasonal changes in the biological activity, summer and winter time points were compared. This study reveals the ecology of an overlooked environment in Belgian river systems and tries to explain the build-up of travertines. [less ▲]

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See detailRaman characterization of the UV-protective pigment gloeocapsin and its role in the survival of cyanobacteria
Storme, Jean-Yves ULiege; Golubic, Stjepko; Wilmotte, Annick ULiege et al

in Astrobiology (2015), 15(10),

Extracellular UV-screening pigments gloeocapsin and scytonemin present in the EPS envelopes of extremophile cyanobacteria of freshwater and marine environments were studied by Raman spectroscopy and ... [more ▼]

Extracellular UV-screening pigments gloeocapsin and scytonemin present in the EPS envelopes of extremophile cyanobacteria of freshwater and marine environments were studied by Raman spectroscopy and compared to their intracellular photosynthetic pigments. This Raman spectral analysis of the extracellular pigment gloeocapsin showed that it shared Raman spectral signatures with parietin, a radiation-protective pigment known in lichens. The UV-light spectra also showed similarities. Gloeocapsin occurs in some cyanobacterial species, mostly with exclusion of scytonemin, indicating that these pigments have evolved in cyanobacteria as separate protective strategies. Both gloeocapsin and scytonemin are widely and species-specifically distributed in different cyanobacterial genera and families. The widespread occurrence of these pigments may suggest an early origin, while their detection by Raman Spectroscopy makes them potential biosignatures for cyanobacteria in the fossil record and demonstrates the usefulness of non-destructive Raman spectroscopy analyses for the search of complex organics, including possible photosynthetic pigments, if preservable in early Earth and extraterrestrial samples. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards a palaeoecological model of the Mesoproterozoic Taoudeni basin
Beghin, Jérémie ULiege; Poulton, Simon; Gueneli, Nur et al

Conference (2015)

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See detailBiostratigraphic and chemostratigraphic constraints of the Mbuji-Mayi Supergroup, Democratic Republic of Congo
Kabamba Baludikay, Blaise ULiege; Bekker, Andrey; Baudet, Daniel et al

Poster (2014, December 16)

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See detailBIODIVERSITY AND REDOX CONDITIONS THROUGH THE PROTEROZOIC TAOUDENI BASIN OF MAURITANIA
Beghin, Jérémie ULiege; Poulton, Simon; Gueneli, Nur et al

Scientific conference (2014, November 03)

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See detailBiostratigraphic and chemostratigraphic constraints of the Mbuji-Mayi Supergroup (Meso-Neoproterozoic age), Democratic Republic of Congo.
Kabamba Baludikay, Blaise ULiege; Bekker, Andrey; Baudet, Daniel et al

Conference (2014, November 03)

The Mbuji-Mayi Supergroup is a sedimentary sequence unaffected by regional metamorphism [1]. It was deposited between 1174 ± 22 Ma and ca. 800 Ma in the intracratonic failed-rift SMLL “Sankuru-Mbuji-Mayi ... [more ▼]

The Mbuji-Mayi Supergroup is a sedimentary sequence unaffected by regional metamorphism [1]. It was deposited between 1174 ± 22 Ma and ca. 800 Ma in the intracratonic failed-rift SMLL “Sankuru-Mbuji-Mayi- Lomami- Lovoy” basin [2] which extends from SE to NW between Katanga and Kasai Provinces. And overlies the Mesoproterozoic Kibaran Belt Supergroup (in the eastern part of SMLL basin) while in the Western part, where we focused our work, it rests unconformably upon Archean Dibaya Granitic Complex [3]. The amygdaloidal basaltic pillow lavas (948 ± 20 Ma) overlie the Mbuji-Mayi Supergroup, at the confluence of Mbuji-Mayi and Sankuru rivers [4]. Lithostratigraphically, this Supergroup consists in two distinct successions: a lower siliciclastic sequence (~500m) of BI Group and an upper carbonatic sequence (~1000m) with stromatolitic build-ups and black shales of BII Group [2]. Our own and previous sedimentological observations [5] indicate facies ranging from subtidal, low-energy stromatolitic environments to overlying intertidal to supratidal evaporitic settings of lagoon and sabkha. Here we present data on microfossil diversity and carbon isotope chemostratigraphy from the Kanshi, Lubi and Kafuku drillholes. The well-preserved and diverse assemblage of acritarchs and filamentous forms includes prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and is similar to other coeval assemblages described worldwide outside of Africa. The presence of the acanthomorph acritarch Trachyhystrichosphaera aimika is significant as it is indicative of the late Meso- to early Neoproterozoic age elsewhere, and is reported for the first time in Central Africa. So far, 56 species belonging to 31 genera were identified, dramatically increasing the previously reported diversity [6, 7]. Chemostratigraphy based on δ13Ccarb values for 290 samples, records, for the BI Group, predominantly negative values down to -8 to -9 ‰ VPDB with few samples having more positive, up to +3 ‰, values. Although the siliciclastics-rich sediments in the lower part of the BI Group likely record early diagenetic signal, carbonates in the upper part of the BI Group show similar patterns in both the Lubi and Kafuku drill cores with the sharp fall from +1 to +3 ‰ values to -8 to -7 ‰ and recovery back to +1 ‰ values over 40 to 70 m of section. The BII Group shows a less dramatic rise from -1 ‰ to +4 to +5 ‰ over more than 150 m of section. These large-scale variations differ from the steady-state carbon cycle of the late Mesoproterozoic [8] and are typical of the early Neoproterozoic record [9]. The project is supported by the EU FP7 ERC Stg ELITE. [less ▲]

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See detailBIODIVERSITY AND REDOX CONDITIONS THROUGH THE PROTEROZOIC TAOUDENI BASIN OF MAURITANIA
Beghin, Jérémie ULiege; Poulton, Simon; Gueneli, Nur et al

Conference (2014, September)

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See detailIntegrated bio-chemostratigraphical correlations and climatic evolution across the Danian-Selandian boundary at low latitudes
Storme, Jean-Yves ULiege; Steurbaut, Etienne; Devleeschouwer, Xavier et al

in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology (2014), 414

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See detailFirst Clarkforkian equivalent land mammal age in the latest Paleocene basal Sparnacian facies of Europe: Fauna, flora, paleoenvironment and (bio)stratigraphy
Smith, T.; Quesnel, F.; De Plöeg, G. et al

in PLoS ONE (2014), 9(1),

The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is correlated with the first occurrences of earliest modern mammals in the Northern Hemisphere. The latest Paleocene Clarkforkian North American Land Mammal Age ... [more ▼]

The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is correlated with the first occurrences of earliest modern mammals in the Northern Hemisphere. The latest Paleocene Clarkforkian North American Land Mammal Age, that has yielded rodents and carnivorans, is the only exception to this rule. However, until now no pre-PETM localities have yielded modern mammals in Europe or Asia. We report the first Clarkforkian equivalent Land Mammal Age in the latest Paleocene deposits of the basal Sparnacian facies at Rivecourt, in the north-central part of the Paris Basin. The new terrestrial vertebrate and macroflora assemblages are analyzed through a multidisciplinary study including sedimentologic, stratigraphic, isotopic, and palynological aspects in order to reconstruct the paleoenvironment and to evaluate biochronologic and paleogeographic implications. The mammals are moderately diverse and not abundant, contrary to turtles and champsosaurs. The macroflora is exceptional in preservation and diversity with numerous angiosperms represented by flowers, fruits, seeds and wood preserved as lignite material, revealing an abundance of Arecaceae, Betulaceae, Icacinaceae, Menispermaceae, Vitaceae and probably Cornaceae. Results indicate a Late Paleocene age based on carbon isotope data, palynology and vertebrate occurrences such as the choristoderan Champsosaurus, the arctocyonid Arctocyon , and the plesiadapid Plesiadapis tricuspidens. However, several mammal species compare better with the earliest Eocene. Among these, the particular louisinid Teilhardimys musculus, also recorded from the latest Paleocene of the Spanish Pyrenees, suggests a younger age than the typical MP6 reference level. Nevertheless, the most important aspect of the Rivecourt fauna is the presence of dental remains of a rodent and a "miacid" carnivoran, attesting to the presence of two modern mammalian orders in the latest Paleocene of Europe. Interestingly, these two groups are also the only modern groups recorded from the latest Paleocene of North America, making Rivecourt the first direct equivalent to the Clarkforkian Land Mammal Age outside of North America. © 2014 Smith et al. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst carbon isotope chemostratigraphy of the Ouled Abdoun phosphate Basin, Morocco; implications for dating and evolution of earliest African placental mammals
Yans, J.; Amaghzaz, M.; Bouya, B. et al

in Gondwana Research (2014), 25(1), 257-269

The well-known Maastrichtian-Ypresian vertebrate-bearing phosphate series, in the Ouled Abdoun Basin, Morocco, is classically dated using regional selachian biostratigraphic zonation. These marine ... [more ▼]

The well-known Maastrichtian-Ypresian vertebrate-bearing phosphate series, in the Ouled Abdoun Basin, Morocco, is classically dated using regional selachian biostratigraphic zonation. These marine sediments yielded Paleocene and Eocene mammals comprising the earliest known placentals from Africa. This study provides the first insight into the organic carbon isotope chemostratigraphy (δ13Corg) of the Moroccan phosphate series and a refined dating of its vertebrate-bearing levels. Four Paleocene-Eocene sections in the NE Ouled Abdoun quarries show consistent δ13Corg long term evolutions, from the base to the top: 1) positive trend in phosphorite Bed IIa, beginning with the lower Bone Bed yielding mammals such as Eritherium, Ocepeia, Abdounodus, Lahimia, of early Thanetian and Selandian age; 2) transitional negative trend in the Intercalary phosphorite Beds II/I that includes the Otodus obliquus and Phosphatherium escuilliei Bone Bed of earliest Ypresian age; 3) negative trend to the lowermost δ13Corg values that are correlative to the early-middle Ypresian interval including ETM 2 and ETM 3 hyperthermal events in the global record; 4) positive trend in chert-enriched facies containing the middle Ypresian EECO global climatic event. Our chemostratigraphic study of the Ouled Abdoun phosphate series provides a new chronostratigraphic framework for calibrating the beginning of the evolution of placental mammals in Africa. The lower Bone Bed level from the Paleocene phosphorite Bed IIa yielding Eritherium is not younger than early Thanetian, and is most likely Selandian. The Phosphatherium Bone Bed in the Intercalary Beds II/I is earliest Ypresian. The phosphorite Bed 0, from which Daouitherium probably came, is early-middle Ypresian, just below the EECO. This suggests that the first large proboscideans evolved after the PETM, during mid-Ypresian warming events. The δ13Corg study does not support the presence of Lutetian in the NE Ouled Abdoun phosphate series and suggests that a noticeable part of the upper Thanetian is absent. © 2013 International Association for Gondwana Research. [less ▲]

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See detailMicropaleontology and chemostratigraphy of the Neoproterozoic Mbuji-Mayi Supergroup, Democratic Republic of Congo.
Kabamba Baludikay, Blaise ULiege; Bekker, Andrey; Baudet, Daniel et al

in Geophysical Research Abstracts (2014), 16(EGU2014),

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See detailThe earliest Eocene mammal fauna of the Erquelinnes Sand Member near the French-Belgian border
Missiaen, P.; Quesnel, F.; Dupuis, C. et al

in Geologica Belgica (2013), 16(4), 262-273

The earliest Eocene Erquelinnes site was discovered in 1880, but its mammal fauna has been frequently ignored. This paper provides the first detailed overview of the Erquelinnes mammals since 1929. The ... [more ▼]

The earliest Eocene Erquelinnes site was discovered in 1880, but its mammal fauna has been frequently ignored. This paper provides the first detailed overview of the Erquelinnes mammals since 1929. The new faunal list doubles the known diversity at Erquelinnes to a total of 16 species, now also including amphilemurids, hyaenodontids, mesonychids, louisinids, equids and diacodexeids. The majority of the Erquelinnes species is also present in the earliest Eocene Dormaal MP7 reference fauna, with as most notable exceptions the presence of a potentially dwarfed specimen of Dissacus, and of two perissodactyl taxa at Erquelinnes. The ceratomorph perissodactyl Cymbalophus cuniculus is also known from the earliest Eocene of England, but a specimen identified as cf. Sifrhippus sandrae is closely similar to contemporaneous primitive North American equids. This specimen represents the oldest unambiguous European equid and highlights faunal similarities between Europe and North America during this time interval. Faunal differences between Erquelinnes and Dormaal seem mostly due to depositional differences, and the Erquelinnes fauna represents a typical earliest Eocene fauna, closely similar to other MP7 and PEI faunas in Europe. [less ▲]

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