References of "Simon, Jessica"
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See detailVirtual reality: A tool in the treatment of anxiety in stereotaxic radiotherapy?
Gamin, Nicolas ULiege; JANSEN, Nicolas ULiege; COUCKE, Philippe ULiege et al

Poster (2019, May 14)

Stereotaxic radiotherapy (SR) is an effective treatment for many types ofcancer but seems to cause anxiety. The purpose of this study is to determine whether experiencing the medical procedure by using ... [more ▼]

Stereotaxic radiotherapy (SR) is an effective treatment for many types ofcancer but seems to cause anxiety. The purpose of this study is to determine whether experiencing the medical procedure by using immersive virtual video can reduce preoperative anxiety. The experimental group (n=10) received information about the intervention and was exposed three times to the procedure before the SR. Two immersions took place in the days precedingthe intervention and the third took place just before the SR. The control group (n=10) only received information about the intervention. The STAI Y-A scale was used to measure state anxiety before and after each virtual immersion in the experimental group and just before and after the SR in both groups. We observed a similar decrease in anxiety across groups, which did not differ between them. Despite this result, it is important to point out that the experimental group reported a significant decrease in anxiety after the two immersions of day 1. The third immersion was not accompanied by a decrease of it. In conclusion, virtual reality seems useful in the treatment of preoperative anxiety, but its use is not enough to neutralize patient’s anxiety when approaching treatment [less ▲]

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See detailLa réalité virtuelle : un nouvel outils dans la prise en charge de patients alcoolo-dépendants ?
Simon, Jessica ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (4 ULiège)
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See detailAn Integrative Memory model of recollection and familiarity to understand memory deficits
Bastin, Christine ULiege; Besson, Gabriel ULiege; Simon, Jessica ULiege et al

in Behavioral and Brain Sciences (2019)

Humans can recollect past events in details (recollection) and/or know that an object, person or place has been encountered before (familiarity). During the last two decades, there has been intense debate ... [more ▼]

Humans can recollect past events in details (recollection) and/or know that an object, person or place has been encountered before (familiarity). During the last two decades, there has been intense debate about how recollection and familiarity are organized in the brain. Here, we propose an Integrative Memory model which describes the distributed and interactive neurocognitive architecture of representations and operations underlying recollection and familiarity. In this architecture, the subjective experience of recollection and familiarity arises from the interaction between core systems storing particular kinds of representations shaped by specific computational mechanisms and an attribution system. By integrating principles from current theoretical views about memory functioning, we provide a testable framework to refine the prediction of deficient versus preserved mechanisms in memory-impaired populations. The case of Alzheimer’s disease is considered as an example because it entails progressive lesions starting with limited damage to core systems before invading step-by-step most parts of the model-related network. We suggest a chronological scheme of cognitive impairments along the course of Alzheimer’s disease, where the inaugurating deficit would relate early neurodegeneration of the perirhinal/anterolateral entorhinal cortex to impaired familiarity for items that need to be discriminated as viewpoint-invariant conjunctive entities. The Integrative Memory model can guide future neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies aiming to understand how such a network allows humans to remember past events, to project into the future and possibly also to share experiences. [less ▲]

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See detailEye tracking au sein d'un casque de réalité virtuelle : illustrations et usages
Simon, Jessica ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (6 ULiège)
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See detailImpact of the number of alternatives in a forced choice recognition memory task on performance in normal aging
Marcotte, Coralie ULiege; Simon, Jessica ULiege; Gilsoul, Jessica ULiege et al

Poster (2018, September 13)

Forced-choice recognition memory tasks are often used to test visual episodic memory, notably to assess the effect of age on memory performance. However, no study has examined the impact of the number of ... [more ▼]

Forced-choice recognition memory tasks are often used to test visual episodic memory, notably to assess the effect of age on memory performance. However, no study has examined the impact of the number of alternatives on memory performance. In this experiment, we evaluated whether memory performance of young and older participants is influenced by, on the one hand, the number of proposed alternatives - two or three - and on the other hand the degree of similarity between the target and its lures. The study included 48 young participants and 43 healthy older participants. During the encoding phase, they saw 36 photographs of faces twice. During the recognition task, we asked them to choose the previously presented face among two or three photographs. Half of the target-lure sets were more similar than the other half (60% of common characteristics versus 40%). After the memory task, participants completed the Cambridge Face Perception Test to measure their capacity of perception and processing of faces. The analysis of correct recognition responses (ANOVA 2 (groups) x 2 (alternatives) x 2 (similarity) with repeated measures on the last two variables) showed that older adults had poorer performance than young adults and an effect of the degree of similarity but no effect of the number of alternatives. Interestingly, the age effect on recognition performance disappeared when controlling for face perception abilities. Thus, part of the difficulties in visual recognition memory for faces of older participants could be underpinned by weak perceptual capacities. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of the number of alternatives in a forced choice recognition memory task on performance in normal aging
Marcotte, Coralie ULiege; Simon, Jessica ULiege; Gilsoul, Jessica ULiege et al

Poster (2018, May 18)

Forced-choice recognition memory tasks are often used to test visual episodic memory, notably to assess the effect of age on memory performance. However, no study has examined the impact of the number of ... [more ▼]

Forced-choice recognition memory tasks are often used to test visual episodic memory, notably to assess the effect of age on memory performance. However, no study has examined the impact of the number of alternatives on memory performance. In this experiment, we evaluated whether memory performance of young and older participants is influenced by, on the one hand, the number of proposed alternatives - two or three - and on the other hand the degree of similarity between the target and its lures. The study included 48 young participants and 43 healthy older participants. During the encoding phase, they saw 36 photographs of faces twice. During the recognition task, we asked them to choose the previously presented face among two or three photographs. Half of the target-lure sets were more similar than the other half (60% of common characteristics versus 40%). After the memory task, participants completed the Cambridge Face Perception Test to measure their capacity of perception and processing of faces. The analysis of correct recognition responses (ANOVA 2 (groups) x 2 (alternatives) x 2 (similarity) with repeated measures on the last two variables) showed that older adults had poorer performance than young adults and an effect of the degree of similarity but no effect of the number of alternatives. Interestingly, the age effect on recognition performance disappeared when controlling for face perception abilities. Thus, part of the difficulties in visual recognition memory for faces of older participants could be underpinned by weak perceptual capacities. [less ▲]

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See detailCue exposure in a virtual environment increase alcohol craving in non-dependent users
Simon, Jessica ULiege; Etienne, Anne-Marie ULiege; Bouchard, Stéphane et al

Poster (2018, May 18)

The development of new technologies and more specifically the opportunity to immerse participants in virtual controlled environments brings new ecological framework for researchers to study complex ... [more ▼]

The development of new technologies and more specifically the opportunity to immerse participants in virtual controlled environments brings new ecological framework for researchers to study complex behaviours. Our objective is to determine whether the immersion in alcohol-related virtual environment could increase craving. It was hypothesized that subjective craving levels would be higher in heavy drinkers than light drinkers (Field & Cox, 2008). Based on the score of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT, Saunders et al., 1993), 22 light drinkers and 18 heavy drinkers were recruited and immersed in a virtual bar including alcoholic beverages. In order not to reveal the real purpose of our study, participants were informed that they were going to evaluate the aesthetic qualities and realism of the virtual environment after immersion. Once the immersion is over, participants completed four Visual Analogue Craving Scales and the ITC-SOPI questionnaire (Lessiter, Freeman, Keogh, & Davidoff, 2001) evaluating four aspects of the immersion: the sense of being there, the psychological engagement, its realism and the adverse physiological reactions due to immersion. T-test revealed that heavy drinkers have higher craving scores than light drinkers. Furthermore, stepwise regression reveals that craving was positively explained by the self-reported realism of the environment and the AUDIT score. So, immersion in a hyper stimulant environment may increase the craving of non-dependent consumers while the ecological validity of the task seems to be critical to explain self-report craving. Future studies are needed to explain craving. In particular, the role of attentional biases. [less ▲]

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See detailÉvaluation des biais attentionnels envers l’alcool chez des consommateurs non-dépendants immergés dans un environnement virtuel
Simon, Jessica ULiege; Grogna, David ULiege; Etienne, Anne-Marie ULiege et al

Conference (2018, April 23)

Selon certains auteurs, la consommation répétée d’une substance conduirait l’individu à diriger automatiquement son attention sur les indices présents dans l’environnement associés à cette substance (dans ... [more ▼]

Selon certains auteurs, la consommation répétée d’une substance conduirait l’individu à diriger automatiquement son attention sur les indices présents dans l’environnement associés à cette substance (dans le cas de l’alcoolisme, un verre de bière ou une bouteille de vin, par exemple) et à émettre des comportements d’approche envers ces stimuli. Dans une première étude, nous avons montré que l’immersion dans un contexte de réalité virtuelle en lien avec la consommation d’alcool (un bar) peut induire un craving plus élevé chez les grands consommateurs que chez les petits consommateurs. Les études ultérieures auront pour objectif de déterminer quelles sont les composantes de l’attention qui sont liées à une augmentation du craving. Notre objectif étant de mieux comprendre les biais cognitifs associés à l’alcoolisme afin d’améliorer la qualité de la prise en charge des patients alcoolo-dépendants. [less ▲]

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See detailDo attentional capacities and processing speed mediate the effect of age on executive functioning?
Gilsoul, Jessica ULiege; Simon, Jessica ULiege; Hogge, Michaël et al

in Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition (2018)

The executive processes are well known to decline with age, and similar data also exists for attentional capacities and processing speed. Therefore, we investigated whether these two last nonexecutive ... [more ▼]

The executive processes are well known to decline with age, and similar data also exists for attentional capacities and processing speed. Therefore, we investigated whether these two last nonexecutive variables would mediate the effect of age on executive functions (inhibition, shifting, updating, and dual-task coordination). We administered a large battery of executive, attentional and processing speed tasks to 104 young and 71 older people, and we performed mediation analyses with variables showing a significant age effect. All executive and processing speed measures showed age-related effects while only the visual scanning task performance (selective attention) was explained by age when controlled for gender and educational level. Regarding mediation analyses, visual scanning partially mediated the age effect on updating while processing speed partially mediated the age effect on shifting, updating and dual-task coordination. In a more exploratory way, inhibition was also found to partially mediate the effect of age on the three other executive functions. Attention did not greatly influence executive functioning in aging while, in agreement with the literature, processing speed seems to be a major mediator of the age effect on these processes. Interestingly, the global pattern of results seems also to indicate an influence of inhibition but further studies are needed to confirm the role of that variable as a mediator and its relative importance by comparison with processing speed. [less ▲]

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See detailIncreasing the salience of fluency cues does not reduce the recognition memory impairment in Alzheimer’s disease!
Simon, Jessica ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege; SALMON, Eric ULiege et al

in Journal of Neuropsychology (2018), 12

In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), it is now well established that recollection is impaired from the beginning of the disease, whereas findings are less clear concerning familiarity. One of the most important ... [more ▼]

In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), it is now well established that recollection is impaired from the beginning of the disease, whereas findings are less clear concerning familiarity. One of the most important mechanisms underlying familiarity is the sense of familiarity driven by processing fluency. In this study, we attempted to attenuate recognition memory deficits in AD by maximizing the salience of fluency cues in two conditions of a recognition memory task. In one condition, targets and foils have been created from the same pool of letters (Overlap condition). In a second condition, targets and foils have been derived from two separate pools of letters (No-Overlap condition), promoting the use of letter-driven visual and phonetic fluency. Targets and foils were low-frequency words. The memory tasks were performed by 15 patients with AD and 16 healthy controls. Both groups improved their memory performance in the No-Overlap condition compared to the Overlap condition. Patients with AD were able to use fluency cues during recognition memory as older adults did, but this did not allow to compensate for dysfunction of recognition memory processes. [less ▲]

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See detailLa reconnaissance chez les patients qui se plaignent de leur mémoire
Simon, Jessica ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2017)

La reconnaissance est sous-tendue par deux processus, la recollection et la familiarité. Bien que la recollection soit généralement diminuée dans le vieillissement normal et altérée dès les premiers ... [more ▼]

La reconnaissance est sous-tendue par deux processus, la recollection et la familiarité. Bien que la recollection soit généralement diminuée dans le vieillissement normal et altérée dès les premiers stades de la maladie d’Alzheimer, aucun consensus n’a pu être dégagé concernant l’intégrité de la familiarité dans ces populations. Nous avons étudié les conditions associées à une préservation de la familiarité chez des patients âgés avec troubles mnésiques ou avec plainte subjective de mémoire. Des résultats divergents nous ont amené à suggérer que le format de la tâche impacte les performances en mémoire dans certains cas. Nous avons aussi observé une augmentation des fausses alarmes en lien avec la familiarité chez les patients avec un trouble cognitif léger, suggérant un trouble touchant la vérification et le contrôle du sentiment de familiarité lors de la reconnaissance. Finalement, nous avons montré que le déclin en mémoire épisodique des patients présentant un trouble cognitif léger est en partie expliqué par les fausses alarmes en familiarité mesurées 20 mois auparavant. Ce résultat amène à une hypothèse qui mériterait d’être davantage explorée : les erreurs en lien avec la familiarité pourraient être un signe précoce de déclin associé à la maladie d’Alzheimer. [less ▲]

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See detailLa reconnaissance dans le vieillissement normal et pathologique : Exploration des processus de recollection et de familiarité
Simon, Jessica ULiege

Doctoral thesis (2017)

La reconnaissance est sous-tendue par deux processus, la recollection et la familiarité. Bien que la recollection soit généralement diminuée dans le vieillissement normal et altérée dès les premiers ... [more ▼]

La reconnaissance est sous-tendue par deux processus, la recollection et la familiarité. Bien que la recollection soit généralement diminuée dans le vieillissement normal et altérée dès les premiers stades de la maladie d’Alzheimer, aucun consensus n’a pu être dégagé concernant l’intégrité de la familiarité dans ces populations. Dans ce travail, nous avons étudié les conditions associées à une préservation de la familiarité chez des patients âgés avec troubles mnésiques ou avec plainte subjective de mémoire. Nous avons notamment montré qu’il était possible d’améliorer les performances en reconnaissance de patients avec la maladie d’Alzheimer en rendant les indices de fluence saillants et pertinents. Nous avons aussi manipulé le contexte de la tâche afin de moduler les processus attributionnels, fondamentaux dans l’expérience de la familiarité. Nous nous sommes plus particulièrement intéressés au format de la tâche qui est connu pour influencer la contribution de la recollection et la familiarité en reconnaissance. Des résultats divergents nous ont amené à suggérer que le format de la tâche ne suffit pas à lui seul pour influencer de manière consistante le recours à ces deux processus. Cependant, bien que les études présentées ici diffèrent grandement sur plusieurs aspects méthodologiques, nous avons observé de manière consistante une augmentation des fausses alarmes en lien avec la familiarité chez les patients avec un trouble cognitif léger, suggérant un trouble touchant la vérification et le contrôle du sentiment de familiarité lors de la reconnaissance. Finalement, nous avons montré que le déclin en mémoire épisodique des patients présentant un trouble cognitif léger est en partie expliqué par les fausses alarmes en familiarité mesurées 20 mois auparavant. Ce résultat amène à une hypothèse qui mériterait d’être davantage explorée : les erreurs en lien avec la familiarité pourraient être un signe précoce de déclin associé à la maladie d’Alzheimer. [less ▲]

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See detailDo leisures activities and rest-activity rythm explain executive performance in aging?
Collette, Fabienne ULiege; Lesoinne, Alexia ULiege; Gilsoul, Jessica ULiege et al

Conference (2017, November 24)

There exists a large inter-individual variability regarding the effects of aging on cognition. Sleep-wake rhythms and cognitive reserve may contribute to explain why some people appear to be more ... [more ▼]

There exists a large inter-individual variability regarding the effects of aging on cognition. Sleep-wake rhythms and cognitive reserve may contribute to explain why some people appear to be more resistant to the effects of aging than others. Particularly, individuals who have developed a high level of reserve resist better to the effects of aging than individuals with lower cognitive reserve. Conversely, a decrease of day-to-day stability of sleep-wake rhythms and an increase of sleep fragmentation may contribute to potentiate the effects of aging. In this study, we describe the impact of cognitive reserve and rest-activity rhythm on executive functions in normal aging. One hundred and sixty five healthy participants aged from 59 to 81 years were recruited. We assessed the three major executive functions: Inhibition (Stroop test, Hayling test, TAP Incompatibility subtest), Shifting (TAP Flexibility subtest, Plus-Minus task), and Updating (Letter-Number Sequencing subtest from MEM III, Letter memory task, 2-back task). Cognitive reserve was measured by questionnaires assessing leisure activities across the lifespan. Actigraphy was used to measure parameters of sleep-wake cycle (24-h fragmentation and 24-h stability) over a minimal period of 12 days. In a first model, multiple linear regressions (p<0.05) adjusted for age, Mattis score and processing speed showed that education did not explained executive performance. Conversely, current practice of at least one social leisure activity has a positive impact on flexibility and a minimum of 3 intellectual activities or a minimum of two social activities regularly performed are necessary to have a positive impact on updating. In a second model adjusted for age, Mattis score and processing speed and formal education, we did not observed a significant effect of day-to-day stability and sleep fragmentation on executive functioning. These results suggest that the cognitive reserve is related to abilities in some executive tests while rest-activity rhythm does not seem to explain the inter-individual variability of executive performance. [less ▲]

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