References of "Scippo, Marie-Louise"
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See detailPotential new sources of hypoglycin A poisoning for equids kept at pasture in spring: a field pilot study
Votion, Dominique ULiege; Habyarimana, J.A.; Scippo, Marie-Louise ULiege et al

in Veterinary Record: Journal of the British Veterinary Association (2019)

The first objective of this pilot study was to measure the concentration of HGA in samaras of sycamore trees fallen on the ground and then in seedlings from germination. The subsequent objective was to ... [more ▼]

The first objective of this pilot study was to measure the concentration of HGA in samaras of sycamore trees fallen on the ground and then in seedlings from germination. The subsequent objective was to examine other possible sources of HGA intoxication. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of sex and sub-zero storage temperature on the microbial and oxidative stability of beef packed in a high-oxygen atmosphere after different vacuum ageing times
Didimo Imazaki, Pedro Henrique ULiege; Elansary, Mahmoud ULiege; Scippo, Marie-Louise ULiege et al

in Meat Science (2019), 148

This study aimed to evaluate the effect of sex and sub-zero storage temperature on the microbial and oxidative stability of Belgian Blue beef packed in a high-oxygen atmosphere after different ageing ... [more ▼]

This study aimed to evaluate the effect of sex and sub-zero storage temperature on the microbial and oxidative stability of Belgian Blue beef packed in a high-oxygen atmosphere after different ageing times. Longissimus thoracis et lumborum from Belgian Blue young bulls and cull cows were aged at −1 or 4 °C for 80 days in vacuum. Every 20 days, samples were repackaged in a high-oxygen atmosphere (70/30% O2/CO2) and stored for 7 days (2 days at 4 °C + 5 days at 8 °C). Ageing at −1 °C had a protective effect against the growth of lactic acid bacteria and Enterobacteriaceae and myoglobin oxidation. Brochothrix thermosphacta was the limiting parameter for ageing longer than 20 days at −1 °C, permitting a subsequent 7-day shelf-life in a high-oxygen atmosphere. Meat from young bulls was more sensitive to oxidation than meat from cull cows. Extending Belgian Blue meat ageing for >20 days had a negative impact on retail shelf-life. [less ▲]

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See detailComparative acute toxicity of two phytosanitary molecules, lambda-cyhalothrin and acetamiprid, on Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis Niloticus) juveniles
Guedegba; Imorou Toko; Agbohessi et al

in Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part B, Pesticides, Food Contaminants and Agricultural Wastes (2019)

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See detailDevelopment of an analytical method to detect short-chain fatty acids by SPME-GC–MS in samples coming from an in vitro gastrointestinal model
Douny, Caroline ULiege; Dufourny, Sandrine ULiege; Brose, François ULiege et al

in Journal of Chromatography. B, Analytical Technologies in the Biomedical and Life Sciences (2019)

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See detailMicrobiological characteristics of smoked and smoked–dried fish processed in Benin
Anihouvi, Gildas; Kpoclou, Euloge; Massih, Marleen et al

in Food Science and Nutrition (2019)

This study aimed to assess the microbiological status of smoked fish (SF) and smoked– dried fish (SDF) processed in Benin, and to identify the contamination factors associated with these products. A total ... [more ▼]

This study aimed to assess the microbiological status of smoked fish (SF) and smoked– dried fish (SDF) processed in Benin, and to identify the contamination factors associated with these products. A total of 66 fish samples, including fresh fish and processed fish, were randomly collected from different processing sites and markets for microbial characterization using standard methods. The aerobic mesophilic bacteria (AMB) density varied from 2.9 to 9.5 Log10 CFU/g. Enterobacteriaceae, Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Clostridium perfringens, yeasts, and molds were present in 63.9%, 27.8%, 55.6%, 58.3%, 61.1%, and 77.8% of samples, respectively, while no Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus were found. The majority (66.7%) of SF samples and 22.2% of SDF samples were not compliant with the acceptable limit of <7.0 Log10 CFU/g recommended by the Health Protection Agency for AMB, whereas the Enterobacteriaceae counts exceeded the recommended level of 4.0 Log10 CFU/g for 50% of SF and 5.6% of SDF samples. Likewise, 38.9% of SF samples were not compliant for E. coli. Microbiological hazard analysis of practices allowed to identify the sensitive steps where hygiene measures need to be emphasized for an improved quality control. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of antimicrobial products used in tilapia (Oreochromis spp.) and whiteleg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) aquaculture
Li, Kang; Liu, Liping; Zhan, Jia et al

in Aquaculture Research (2019), 50

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See detailContribution of the methodology of collective expertise to the mitigation of food safety hazards in low- or medium-income countries
Montet, Didier; Hazm, Jamal Eddine; Ouadia, Abdelouahab et al

in Food Control (2019), 99

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See detailOccurrence of Acetamiprid Residues in Water Reservoirs in the Cotton Basin of Northern Benin
Zoumenou, Yémalin Mawunan Genia Berny's ULiege; Aïna, Martin Pépin; Toko, Ibrahim et al

in Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology (2019), 102

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See detailPratiques phytosanitaires et niveau d’exposition aux pesticides des producteurs de coton du nord du Bénin
Gouda, Abdoul-Ibrachi ULiege; Toko Imorou, Ibrahim; Salami, Sharaf-Dine et al

in Cahiers Agricultures (2018), 27

In Benin, terrestrial ecosystems are polluted by a widespread presence of pesticide residues released by an intensive use of plant protection products in agriculture, mainly those sprayed on cotton crops ... [more ▼]

In Benin, terrestrial ecosystems are polluted by a widespread presence of pesticide residues released by an intensive use of plant protection products in agriculture, mainly those sprayed on cotton crops. In order to assess the exposure of producers to pesticides and predict the potential impact on human health, field observation of local practices coupled with semi-structured surveys were conducted among 150 cotton growers in Gogounou, Kandi and Banikoara in Northern Benin, the main cotton production area of the country. Seventy-five percent of producers never received an education nor instructions of use, while only 5% have been trained in the safe use of pesticides on cotton crops. Among pesticides used by farmers, only 19% belong to the approved list of plant protection products in Benin. The most frequently used active substances are insecticides such as acetamiprid, lambda-cyhalothrin, chlorpyrifos-ethyl, emamectin benzoate, profenofos or cypermethrin. All are known to be more or less toxic and may have detrimental effects on health after exposure. Seventy-five percent of producers use higher amounts of insecticides than recommended on the labels and 80% do not wear personal protective equipment during mixing, loading and spraying. Empty pesticide containers are often left in cotton fields (73% of observations) or sometimes used for domestic purposes (25% of observations). Field observations were translated into reliable scenarios to estimate the exposure levels of producers, using the UK-POEM predictive model. Total exposures without personal protective equipment vary from 0.099 to 0.546 mg/kg body weight/day. Exposure values far exceed the Acceptable Operator Exposure Levels, indicating a potential risk. [less ▲]

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See detailTriamcinolone acetonide after intra-articular injection in knee in sheep
Legrand, Nathalie ULiege; Tian, Jin; Douny, Caroline ULiege et al

Poster (2018, October 26)

Intra-articular injections of glucocorticoids aim to control pain and inflammation caused by osteoarthritis. There is a lack of evidence and pharmacokinetics (PK) studies to support the empirical ... [more ▼]

Intra-articular injections of glucocorticoids aim to control pain and inflammation caused by osteoarthritis. There is a lack of evidence and pharmacokinetics (PK) studies to support the empirical currently used dosage regimens. This study aimed 1) to determine the PK of triamcinolone hexacetonide (TH) and triamcinolone acetonide, its active metabolite (TA), in synovial fluid after intra-articular administration of a suspension of TH at 40mg and 10mg in sheep and 2) to compare the profiles of TA after injection of suspensions of TA or TH, both at 40mg. Twelve sheep were randomly allocated to three groups receiving respectively 40 mg TA (n=4), 40 mg TH (n=4) or 10 mg TH (n=4) in the left knee. Synovial fluids were sampled from day 1 up to day 21. The concentrations of TA and TH were measured by ultra-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. TA concentrations measured after one day were higher in the group TA-40 mg (537762.3ng/ml) compared to those recorded in the group TH-40mg (22743.4ng/ml), On day 21, the corresponding values were 2.5 and 33.5 ng/ml due to a significant higher value of T1/2β of TA in group TH-40 mg (6.0 versus 1.9 days). The differences between the mean values of AUC and T1/2β of TA were not significantly different between the groups TH-10 and -40 mg but T1/2β of TH was significantly higher in the group TH-40mg. In conclusion, TH injection maintains TA concentrations for a longer period of time than TA administration. Due to a possible saturation of esterases, the PK profiles associated to the high and low doses of TH were rather close suggesting that a dose of 10mg could provide an optimal benefit-risk. [less ▲]

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See detailA realistic mixture of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) reveals possible synergism to inhibit the transactivation activities of the rat Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (rAhR) in vitro
Doan Thi Que, ULiege; Muller, Marc ULiege; Berntsen, HF et al

in Toxicology Letters (2018, October 01)

While organisms are exposed to mixtures of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), scientific studies usually focus on the toxicity of a single compound at a time and few have addressed the mixture effect ... [more ▼]

While organisms are exposed to mixtures of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), scientific studies usually focus on the toxicity of a single compound at a time and few have addressed the mixture effect. This study aims to determine how a realistic mixture of POPs can affect transactivation of the rat Aryl hydrocarbon Receptor (rAhR) in vitro. Luciferase reporter Dioxin responsive rat hepatoma cell lines (DR-H4IIE) were used to screen both rAhR agonistic and antagonistic activities of 29 compounds: six perfluorinated (PFAA), seven brominated (Br), and 16 chlorinated (Cl) compounds (seven polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and nine organochlorine pesticides) listed as POPs under the 2001 Stockholm Convention. Only 5 (2 Cl and 3 Br) out of the 29 compounds presented rAhR agonistic activities while 16 (13 Cl and 3 Br) were rAhR antagonists. No effect was observed for PFAAs. To test possible interactions between these compounds, a mixture of these 29 POPs and six sub-mixtures (PFAA, Br, Cl, Cl + Br, Cl + PFAA and Br + PFAA), prepared based on the respective concentrations found in Scandinavian human blood with a normal daily intake, were tested for the same activities. Not surprisingly, POP mixture also displayed a rAhR antagonistic activity (IC50 = 371 ± 52 times the blood level) with the lowest effective concentration found at 75-time blood level. This level could be plausibly reached in humans after a food contamination incident or in highly exposed sub-populations. Testing the sub-mixtures showed that the Cl mixture is responsible for the antagonism of the POP mixture, contributing to 80% of the POP response. When DR-H4IIE cells were exposed to the Cl + PFAA mixture, the antagonist level was the same as the response of the POP mixture. This indicates that PFAAs are probably non-specific rAhR antagonists as they did not induce any antagonist response when tested alone. The IC50 of the Cl mixture calculated from the measured IC50 of all 13 active chlorinated compounds, using an additive model, was about the same as the measured IC50, 1.9 M and 2.3 M, respectively. This suggests that these compounds act additively in the Cl mixture. In contrast, the calculated and measured IC50 for the total POP mixture were 22 M and 43.2 M, respectively, along with non-specific rAhR antagonism of PFAA mixture, indicating a possible synergistic effect. [less ▲]

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See detailÉmergence de la toxicité printanière et influence des conditions météorologiques sur les risques de myopathie atypique
Habyarimana, J.A.; Gustin, Pascal ULiege; Scippo, Marie-Louise ULiege et al

in Proceeding de la 44ème Journée de la Recherche équine (2018, March)

Atypical myopathy (AM) equine in Europe results from the ingestion of hypoglycin A (HGA) contained in samara and seedlings of sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus). The concentration of HGA was determined ... [more ▼]

Atypical myopathy (AM) equine in Europe results from the ingestion of hypoglycin A (HGA) contained in samara and seedlings of sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus). The concentration of HGA was determined in samaras fallen on the ground and in seedlings of sycamore maple harvested every 15 days, in spring 2016. Other samples have been also collected: flowers, sycamore saplings and hay. Based on the maximum concentrations of HGA measured in the sycamore samples and extrapolating the toxic dose to a horse from the literature data (dose based on laboratory animals), it can be estimated that at certain times less than 20 g samaras or less than 50 seedlings are enough to reach the maximum tolerated dose for a horse. In addition, this hypothetical toxic dose can be reached with 150 g of inflorescences and 2 L of rainwater that has dripped onto seedlings. The hay produced on one of the grasslands contained HGA in a concentration depending on the number of seedlings dried and included in it. [less ▲]

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See detailPhysiological and proteomic responses to corticosteroid treatments in Eurasian perch, Perca fluviatilis: Investigation of immune-related parameters
Milla, S.; Massart, Sébastien ULiege; Mathieu, C. et al

in Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part D, Genomics and Proteomics (2018), 25

The comparative effects of cortisol and 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC), two major corticosteroids in fish, have yet received little attention in teleosts. We evaluated the proteomic and immune responses of ... [more ▼]

The comparative effects of cortisol and 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC), two major corticosteroids in fish, have yet received little attention in teleosts. We evaluated the proteomic and immune responses of Eurasian perch to chronic corticosteroid treatments. We implanted immature perch with cortisol (80 mg/kg) or DOC (4 mg/kg) and measured the proportions of blood leucocytes, immune indices in the plasma, spleen and liver (complement and lysozyme activity, total immunoglobulin and immune gene expression in the tissues) and differential proteome expression (corticosteroid versus control) in the liver and the spleen on days 2, 4 and 14 post-treatment. Implantation of cortisol decreased the ratio of blood leucocytes and depressed Ig levels in both organs while DOC modulated the proportion of leucocyte sub-populations (increase in lymphocytes and decrease in granulocytes). In contrast, the innate humoral immunity was not strongly influenced by any of corticosteroid implants. The only immune parameter that was significantly affected was lysozyme, after DOC treatment. A number of proteins were differentially regulated by these hormones and some were identified in the liver (21 for cortisol and 8 for DOC) and in the spleen (10 for cortisol and 10 for DOC). None of the proteins was directly linked to immunity, except the natural killer enhancing factor, which was repressed by cortisol in the spleen. Our results also confirm that the proteins involved in energetic and glucose metabolism are affected by corticosteroids. Furthermore, these corticosteroids differently regulate immune status in Eurasian perch and they primarily impact leucocytes, as opposed to innate immune function. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailBioconcentration and half-life of quinalphos pesticide in rice-fish integration system in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam
Nguyen, Quoc Thinh ULiege; Tran Minh, Phu; Douny, Caroline ULiege et al

in Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part B, Pesticides, Food Contaminants and Agricultural Wastes (2018), 53

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See detailAn awkward fishing expedition
MARISSIAUX, Laurent ULiege; Scippo, Marie-Louise ULiege; Daube, Georges ULiege et al

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (2018), 69(2),

We report the case of a patient, among a group of five, in a small outbreak of histamine fish poisoning (HFP). The epidemic character of the ailment led us to the correct diagnosis. In this case, the ... [more ▼]

We report the case of a patient, among a group of five, in a small outbreak of histamine fish poisoning (HFP). The epidemic character of the ailment led us to the correct diagnosis. In this case, the diagnosis was also associated with a Kounis syndrome (KS). Literature concerning this subject is reviewed, reporting recent physiopathological data. [less ▲]

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See detailComparaison de la dérive pour deux types de pulvérisateurs utilisés en production cotonnière au Bénin
Gouda, Abdoul-Ibrachi ULiege; Mehoba, Mahodjègbé Hermas Luc; Toko, Ibrahim Imorou et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement (2018), 22(2),

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