References of "Schroyen, Martine"
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See detailThe use of inulin and wheat bran only during the starter period or during the entire rearing life of broilers: effects on growth performance, small intestinal maturation, and cecal microbial colonization until slaughter age.
Li, Bing ULiege; Schroyen, Martine ULiege; Leblois, Julie et al

in Poultry Science (2019)

Inulin and wheat bran were added to broiler diets during the starter period or during the entire rearing period to investigate whether the effects of using these ingredients remained until slaughter age ... [more ▼]

Inulin and wheat bran were added to broiler diets during the starter period or during the entire rearing period to investigate whether the effects of using these ingredients remained until slaughter age. Diets containing no inulin and no wheat bran (CON), 2% inulin (IN), 10% wheat bran (WB), or 2% inulin + 10% wheat bran (IN+WB) were provided until day 11. Thereafter, each dietary treatment was further divided into a continued diet with supplementation or a control diet, resulting in 7 groups (CON, IN/IN, IN/CON, WB/WB, WB/CON, IN+WB/IN+WB, or IN+WB/CON). On day 40, 12 chickens per group were euthanized. The IN/IN group increased the cecal molar ratio of butyrate but had a lower relative abundance of Lactobacillus (P < 0.05). Additionally, the cecal molar ratio of propionate was higher in the IN/CON group compared to the IN/IN group (P = 0.034). The WB/CON group had the best results on BW and feed conversion ratio (FCR) (P < 0.05). Only the cecal molar ratio of iso-butyrate was higher in the WB/WB group (P = 0.013). Moreover, compared to the CON group, both WB/WB and WB/CON groups reduced the relative abundances of Bifidobacterium and Escherichia coli, and only the WB/WB group reduced the relative abundance of Enterobacteriaceae (P < 0.05). Both IN+WB/IN+WB and IN+WB/CON groups increased BW until day 21 and lowered the relative abundance of Bifidobacterium (P < 0.05). The IN+WB/IN+WB group increased the cecal molar ratio of butyrate but reduced the molar ratio of propionate with a higher relative abundance of Enterobacteriaceae (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the lack of positive effects induced by inulin might be explained by the dose being too high. The beneficial effects on BW, FCR, and microbiota induced by wheat bran during the starter period were lasting when supplementation was stopped, suggesting that wheat bran could be a favorable ingredient during the starter period. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of inulin supplementation to piglets in the suckling period on growth performance, postileal microbial and immunological traits in the suckling period and three weeks after weaning
Li, Bing ULiege; Schroyen, Martine ULiege; Leblois, Julie ULiege et al

in Archives of Animal Nutrition (2018), 72(6), 425-442

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of inulin (IN) supplementation to suckling piglets at and 3 weeks post-weaning. A total of 72 newborn piglets were used. Twenty-four piglets per group ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of inulin (IN) supplementation to suckling piglets at and 3 weeks post-weaning. A total of 72 newborn piglets were used. Twenty-four piglets per group received different amounts of IN during the suckling period: (a) CON: no IN; (b) IN-0.5: 0.5 g IN/d on the 1st week, 1 g IN/d on the 2nd week, 1.5 g IN/d on the 3rd week and 2 g IN/d on the 4th week, or (c) IN-0.75: 0.75 g IN/d on the 1st week, 1.5 g IN/d on the 2nd week, 2.25 g IN/d on the 3rd week and 3 g IN/d on the 4th week. Starting at 28 d of age, piglets were weaned and received a postweaning diet without inulin during the following 3 weeks. At both 28 d and 49 d of age, piglets were euthanised for sampling. Piglets of group IN-0.5 had the highest body weight starting from the 3rd week (p < 0.05), concomitant with the highest villus height and the ratio of villus height/crypt depth in the jejunum and ileum on both sampling days (p < 0.05). At 28 d of age, an increased concentration of propionate, iso-butyrate or total short chain fatty acids was observed between treatment IN-0.5 and the other groups in the caecum or colon (p < 0.05). Moreover, the relative abundance of Escherichia coli (p = 0.05) and Enterobacteriaceae (p = 0.01) in colonic digesta were reduced in IN-0.5-treated piglets, and in both INsupplemented groups, colonic interleukin-8, tumor necrosis factor- α and toll-like receptor-4 mRNA abundance were decreased compared to the CON group (p < 0.05). However, at 49 d of age, most of these differences disappeared. In conclusion, treatment IN- 0.5 improved during the suckling period of piglets development of intestine, but these beneficial effects were not lasting after weaning, when IN supplementation was terminated. Treatment IN-0.75, however, did not display a prebiotic effect. [less ▲]

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See detailGenomic prediction of piglet response to infection with one of two porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus isolates
Waide, Emily H; Tuggle, Christopher K; Serão, Nick VL et al

in Genetics, Selection, Evolution (2018)

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See detailCreating effective biocontainment facilities and maintenance protocols for raising specific pathogen-free, severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) pigs
Powell, Ellis J; Charley, Sara; Boettcher, Adeline N et al

in Laboratory Animals (2018)

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See detailDeveloping Tools for Evaluating Chromatin Preps for Porcine Functional Genomics
Tuggle, Christopher K.; Huang, Jianzhen; Beiki, Hamid et al

Poster (2018)

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See detailGenomic prediction of a PRRS-vaccinated training population to predict host response to PRRS virus-only or PRRS virus/PCV2b co-infection
Dunkelberger, Jenelle R; Serão, Nicolas VL; Niederweder, Megan et al

Poster (2017)

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See detailPigs selected for increased natural resistance to PRRS are more resistant to PRRSV/PCV2b co-infection
Dunkelberger, Jenelle R; Serão, Nicolas VL; Niederwerder, Megan et al

Poster (2017)

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See detailGenomewide association of piglet responses to infection with one of two porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus isolates.
Waide, E. H.; Tuggle, C. K.; Serao, N. V. L. et al

in Journal of Animal Science (2017), 95(1), 16-38

Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is a devastating disease in the swine industry. Identification of host genetic factors that enable selection for improved performance during PRRS virus ... [more ▼]

Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is a devastating disease in the swine industry. Identification of host genetic factors that enable selection for improved performance during PRRS virus (PRRSV) infection would reduce the impact of this disease on animal welfare and production efficiency. We conducted genomewide association study (GWAS) analyses of data from 13 trials of approximately 200 commercial crossbred nursery-age piglets that were experimentally infected with 1 of 2 type 2 isolates of PRRSV (NVSL 97-7985 [NVSL] and KS2006-72109 [KS06]). Phenotypes analyzed were viral load (VL) in blood during the first 21 d after infection (dpi) and weight gain (WG) from 0 to 42 dpi. We accounted for the previously identified QTL in the region on SSC4 in our models to increase power to identify additional regions. Many regions identified by single-SNP analyses were not identified using Bayes-B, but both analyses identified the same regions on SSC3 and SSC5 to be associated with VL in the KS06 trials and on SSC6 in the NVSL trials ( < 5 x 10); for WG, regions on SSC5 and SSC17 were associated in the NVSL trials ( < 3 x 10). No regions were identified with either method for WG in the KS06 trials. Except for the region on SSC4, which was associated with VL for both isolates (but only with WG for NVSL), identified regions did not overlap between the 2 PRRSV isolate data sets, despite high estimates of the genetic correlation between isolates for traits based on these data. We also identified genomic regions whose associations with VL or WG interacted with either PRRSV isolate or with genotype at the SSC4 QTL. Gene ontology (GO) annotation terms for genes located near moderately associated SNP ( < 0.003) were enriched for multiple immunologically (VL) and metabolism- (WG) related GO terms. The biological relevance of these regions suggests that, although it may increase the number of false positives, the use of single-SNP analyses and a relaxed threshold also increased the identification of true positives. In conclusion, although only the SSC4 QTL was associated with response to both PRRSV isolates, genes near associated SNP were enriched for the same GO terms across PRRSV isolates, suggesting that host responses to these 2 isolates are affected by the actions of many genes that function together in similar biological processes. [less ▲]

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See detailRewiring of porcine mRNA and miRNA networks in response to selection of residual feed intake
Beiki, Hamid; Schroyen, Martine ULiege; Rakshandeh, Anoosh et al

Poster (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (1 ULiège)
See detailIdentifying tissue specific gene expression using RNAseq data from multiple porcine tissues
Huang, Jianzhen; Schroyen, Martine ULiege; Gabler, Nick et al

Poster (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (2 ULiège)
See detailContact hypersensitivity testing shows long-term hapten-specific memory associated with increased liver NK cell populations up to 32 days post-sensitization.
Powell, Ellis J; Boettcher, Adeline N; Varley, Lisa et al

Poster (2016)

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See detailBioinformatic analyses in early host response to Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome virus (PRRSV) reveals pathway differences between pigs with alternate genotypes for a major host response QTL
Schroyen, Martine ULiege; Eisley, C.; Koltes, J. E. et al

in BMC Genomics (2016), 17(1),

Background: A region on Sus scrofa chromosome 4 (SSC4) surrounding single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker WUR10000125 (WUR) has been reported to be strongly associated with both weight gain and serum ... [more ▼]

Background: A region on Sus scrofa chromosome 4 (SSC4) surrounding single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker WUR10000125 (WUR) has been reported to be strongly associated with both weight gain and serum viremia in pigs after infection with PRRS virus (PRRSV). A proposed causal mutation in the guanylate binding protein 5 gene (GBP5) is predicted to truncate the encoded protein. To investigate transcriptional differences between WUR genotypes in early host response to PRRSV infection, an RNA-seq experiment was performed on globin depleted whole blood RNA collected on 0, 4, 7, 10 and 14 days post-infection (dpi) from eight littermate pairs with one AB (favorable) and one AA (unfavorable) WUR genotype animal per litter. Results: Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis of transcripts that were differentially expressed (DE) between dpi across both genotypes revealed an inflammatory response for all dpi when compared to day 0. However, at the early time points of 4 and 7dpi, several GO terms had higher enrichment scores compared to later dpi, including inflammatory response (p < 10-7), specifically regulation of NFkappaB (p < 0.01), cytokine, and chemokine activity (p < 0.01). At 10 and 14dpi, GO term enrichment indicated a switch to DNA damage response, cell cycle checkpoints, and DNA replication. Few transcripts were DE between WUR genotypes on individual dpi or averaged over all dpi, and little enrichment of any GO term was found. However, there were differences in expression patterns over time between AA and AB animals, which was confirmed by genotype-specific expression patterns of several modules that were identified in weighted gene co-expression network analyses (WGCNA). Minor differences between AA and AB animals were observed in immune response and DNA damage response (p = 0.64 and p = 0.11, respectively), but a significant effect between genotypes pointed to a difference in ion transport/homeostasis and the participation of G-coupled protein receptors (p = 8e-4), which was reinforced by results from regulatory and phenotypic impact factor analyses between genotypes. Conclusion: We propose these pathway differences between WUR genotypes are the result of the inability of the truncated GBP5 of the AA genotyped pigs to inhibit viral entry and replication as quickly as the intact GBP5 protein of the AB genotyped pigs. © 2016 Schroyen et al. [less ▲]

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