References of "Scavezzoni, Isaure"
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See detailDyrosaurids have a unique postcranial anatomy
Scavezzoni, Isaure ULiege; Fischer, Valentin ULiege

Poster (2021, December 19)

Dyrosauridae is a family of neosuchian crocodyliformes known from both terrestrial and aquatic environments across the Cretaceous–Palaeogene transition. The postcranium of dyrosaurids comprises ... [more ▼]

Dyrosauridae is a family of neosuchian crocodyliformes known from both terrestrial and aquatic environments across the Cretaceous–Palaeogene transition. The postcranium of dyrosaurids comprises astonishing features such as their vertebra with hypapohyses and tall neural spines, their well-developed pelvic girdles, and stout limbs, etc. However, their postcranial anatomy has long been overlooked, obscuring both their locomotive adaptations and the magnitude of their disparity. From this point of view, we thoroughly analysed the entire anatomy of the key dyrosaurids Congosaurus bequaerti and Hyposaurus natator, along with other extant (Crocodylia) and extinct Crocodyliformes (Thalattosuchia). In parallel, we also produced a comprehensive dataset of 187 traits on 27 taxa, largely covering the cranium and postcranium of exemplar crocodyliforms. These data were analysed following principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) to envision the morphospace occupation of Dyrosauridae, Thalattosuchia and Crocodylia. Our data report that Dyrosauridae displays a unique postcranial architecture, considerably contrasting with that of Crocodylia, but in some ways not totally dissimilar from that of Thalattosuchia. Consequently, extant crocodylians might not represent a good functional analogue for extinct crocodyliformes. Furthermore, phylogenetic and disparity analyses would benefit from the employment of more postcranial data. [less ▲]

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See detailThe postcranial skeleton of Cerrejonisuchus improcerus (Crocodyliformes: Dyrosauridae) and the unusual anatomy of dyrosaurids
Scavezzoni, Isaure ULiege; Fischer, Valentin ULiege

in PeerJ (2021)

Dyrosauridae is a clade of neosuchian crocodyliforms that diversified in terrestrial and aquatic environments across the Cretaceous-Paleogene transition. The postcranial anatomy of dyrosaurids has long ... [more ▼]

Dyrosauridae is a clade of neosuchian crocodyliforms that diversified in terrestrial and aquatic environments across the Cretaceous-Paleogene transition. The postcranial anatomy of dyrosaurids has long been overlooked, obscuring both their disparity and their locomotive adaptations. Here we thoroughly describe of the postcranial remains of an unusually small dyrosaurid, Cerrejonisuchus improcerus, from the middle-late Paleocene Cerrejón Formation of Colombia, and we provide a wealth of new data concerning the postcranial anatomy of the key dyrosaurids: Congosaurus bequaerti and Hyposaurus rogersii. We identify a series of postcranial autapomorphies in Cerrejonisuchus improcerus (an elliptic-shaped odontoid laterally wide, a ulna possessing a double concavity, a fibula bearing a widely flattened proximal end, a pubis showing a large non-triangular distal surface) as well as functionally-important traits such as a relatively long ulna (85% of the humerus' length), short forelimb (83% of hindlimb's length), or thoracic vertebra bearing comparatively large lateral process (with widened parapophysis and diapophysis) along with strongly arched thoracic ribs allowing a more sturdy and cylindrical rib cage. These indicate a more terrestrial lifestyle for Cerrejonisuchus compared to the derived members of the clade. We also built a dataset of 187 traits on 27 taxa, that extensively samples the cranial and postcranial architectures of exemplar crocodyliforms. We analyze these data in via Principal Coordinate Analysis (PCoA) to visualize the postcranial morphospace occupation of Dyrosauridae, Thalattosuchia, and Crocodylia. Our data reveal the existence of a distinctive postcranial anatomy for Dyrosauridae that is markedly distinct from that of crocodylians. As a result, modern crocodylians are probably not good functional analog for extinct crocodyliformes. Postcranial data should also be more widely used in phylogenetic and disparity analyses of Crocodyliformes. [less ▲]

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See detailSURVEY OF THE PELVIC AND THORACIC GIRDLES OF DYROSAURID AND THALATTOSUCHIAN CROCODYLIFORMES
Scavezzoni, Isaure ULiege; Fischer, Valentin ULiege; Jouve, Stéphane

Conference (2021, April)

Dyrosauridae is a clade of neosuchian crocodyliformes that diversified in fluviatile and marine environments across the Cretaceous-Paleogene transition. Thalattosuchia is a clade of aquatic crocodyliforms ... [more ▼]

Dyrosauridae is a clade of neosuchian crocodyliformes that diversified in fluviatile and marine environments across the Cretaceous-Paleogene transition. Thalattosuchia is a clade of aquatic crocodyliforms which spanned over the Jurassic period and disappeared during the Early Cretaceous. Both clades crossed extinction events (i.e. Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary for Thalattosuchia; Cretaceous-Paleogene for Dyrosauridae). The postcranial anatomy of both groups has long been overlooked in anatomical descriptions and diagnoses, obscuring their disparity and their locomotive adaptations. We surveyed the morphology of the postcranial skeleton of Dyrosauridae, Thalattosuchia, and Crocodylia, in order to identify osteological correlates for ecology and behaviour as well as test for the existence of evolutionary trends. We thoroughly surveyed the anatomy of crocodyliformes, creating 187 morphofunctional ratios that span the entire skeleton, more than 80% of which being postcranial. Ordination techniques on this extensive dataset reveal the existence of a distinctive postcranial anatomy for both Dyrosauridae and Thalattosuchia which are both markedly distinct from that of crocodylians. As a result, modern crocodylians are likely not a good functional or ecological analogy for extinct crocodyliform groups. It also appears clear that postcranial data in an important component of crocodyliform disparity. A focus on thoracic and pelvic girdles reveals a wide occupation of the morphospace for coastal taxa, even though Dyrosauridae, Thalattosuchia, and Crocodylia occupy clearly separated areas of the morphospace. Within Thalattosuchia, three main clusters are observed regardless of phylogenetic affinities, putatively hinting at global morphotypes within the clade. The most discriminant features between our samples appear to concern primarily the femur (e.g. posterior curvature, fourth trochanter, head protrusion, etc.) with contributions from the pubis, sacrals, and the ilium. This work was supported by the Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique (F.R.S.-FNRS) (Grant MIS F.4511.19). [less ▲]

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See detailFossil Human of Belgium: a review of Quaternary Collections of ULiege
Scavezzoni, Isaure ULiege; Denayer, Julien ULiege

Poster (2019, July)

Palaeoanthropology emerged as a science in the 19th century Belgium. Philippe-Charles Schmerling is notably considered as the first palaeoanthropologist by his pairs. He was the first to survey bone ... [more ▼]

Palaeoanthropology emerged as a science in the 19th century Belgium. Philippe-Charles Schmerling is notably considered as the first palaeoanthropologist by his pairs. He was the first to survey bone deposits in caves around Liège where he discovered in 1830 what he interpreted as the remains of a fossil man different from Homo sapiens. Unfortunately, his fellow scientists were not ready to accept this revolutionary idea and Schmerling’s discoveries were forgotten for over a century. In the 1880s, Prof. Julien Fraipont re-discovered Schmerling’s collection of Quaternary megafauna and subsequently followed the same path when he started to study the cave remains with his colleague Maximin Lohest. Together they described another Belgian celebrity: the ‘Spy Man’ – in fact two incomplete skeleton, identified as a Neanderthalian in 1887. For the first time a fossil man was uncovered from the same horizon than extinct megafauna and Mousterian artefacts. Charles Fraipont, Julien’s son and successor at the Chair of Palaeontology studied Schmerling’s fossils and identified officially the ‘Engis Child’ as the first ever described Neanderthalian. Charles Fraipont created the School of Palaeoanthropology in the 1910s and developed his discipline worldwide. He gathered copies of all fossil human remains known at the time, together with a large amount of anthropological objects. Nowadays, all archaeological and anthropological objects have been split between several institutions but the bulk of the Quaternary megafaunal collection, gathered by these four scientists, is housed in Liège, most of it remains unstudied under modern aspects. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 74 (9 ULiège)
See detailExposition autour de l'Homme fossile de nos régions et de la faune Quaternaire
Scavezzoni, Isaure ULiege

Diverse speeche and writing (2019)

Exposition autour de l'Homme fossile de nos régions et de la faune Quaternaire

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See detailLes bacheliers du bloc 1 Géologie de l'ULiège. Journées de terrain, travaux pratiques: Évolution des environnements et de la tectonique de la région de Boulogne-sur-Mer, Wimereux et Wissant, sous la conduite du Prof. Valentin Fischer et de ses collaborateurs. Séquence video et photos
Marion, Jean-Marc ULiege; Fischer, Valentin ULiege; Denayer, Julien ULiege et al

Learning material (2018)

Field days are essential in learning and understanding geology. From April 16 to 18, 2018, graduates from block 1 Geology of the University of Liège (Belgium) studied the evolution of environments and ... [more ▼]

Field days are essential in learning and understanding geology. From April 16 to 18, 2018, graduates from block 1 Geology of the University of Liège (Belgium) studied the evolution of environments and tectonics in the region of Boulogne-sur-Mer, Wimereux and Wissant (France). [less ▲]

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See detailRhinochelys amaberti (Moret 1935), a protostegid turtle from the Early Cretaceous of France
Scavezzoni, Isaure ULiege; Fischer, Valentin ULiege

in PeerJ (2018), 6(e4594),

Modern marine turtles (chelonioids) are the remnants of an ancient radiation that roots in the Cretaceous. The oldest members of that radiation are first recorded from the Early Cretaceous and a series of ... [more ▼]

Modern marine turtles (chelonioids) are the remnants of an ancient radiation that roots in the Cretaceous. The oldest members of that radiation are first recorded from the Early Cretaceous and a series of species are known from the Albian-Cenomanian interval, many of which have been allocated to the widespread but poorly defined genus Rhinochelys, possibly concealing the diversity and the evolution of early marine turtles. In order to better understand the radiation of chelonioids, we redescribe the holotype and assess the taxonomy of Rhinochelys amaberti Moret 1935 (UJF-ID.11167) from the Late Albian (Stoliczkaia dispar Zone) of the Vallon de la Fauge (Isère, France). We also make preliminary assessments of the phylogenetic relationships of Chelonioidea using two updated datasets that widely sample Cretaceous taxa, especially Rhinochelys. Rhinochelys amaberti is a valid taxon that is supported by eight autapomorphies; an emended diagnosis is proposed. Our phylogenetic analyses suggest that Rhinochelys could be polyphyletic, but constraining it as a monophyletic entity does not produce trees that are significantly less parsimonious. Moreover, support values and stratigraphic congruence indexes are fairly low for the recovered typologies, suggesting that missing data still strongly affect our understanding of the Cretaceous diversification of sea turtles [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 62 (9 ULiège)
See detailNew data on the Mesozoic radiation of chelonioids
Scavezzoni, Isaure ULiege; Fischer, Valentin ULiege

Poster (2017, June)

"Turtles" (Testudines) form a successful group of reptiles with several terrestrial, marine and fresh-water species. Their peculiar and somewhat constrained morphology (i. e. : carapace incorporating ribs ... [more ▼]

"Turtles" (Testudines) form a successful group of reptiles with several terrestrial, marine and fresh-water species. Their peculiar and somewhat constrained morphology (i. e. : carapace incorporating ribs, curved limbs, anapsid skull exempt of temporal fenestrae) and ecology has often obscured their relationships and, hence, their evolutionary history, notably in marine turtles (chelonioids). Modern chelonioids are divided in two clades (i. e. : shoft-shelled turtles and hard-shelled turtles) supported by distinct morphological and embryological characters. Their origin is traced back up to the Cretaceous, along with a series of extinct forms, many of which being collectively known as Protostegidae. Fossil evidence show that at least five clades of marine turtles were roaming the seas at the end of the Cretaceous. In fact, chelonioids appeared during the first stages of the Early Cretaceous and quickly exploded to reach a high level of disparity at the lowermost part of the late Cretaceous. Therefore, the Mesozoic radiation of chelonioids must have happened during the "middle" Cretaceous (especially the Aptian-Albian interval). However this radiation is poorly understood as the phylogenetic relationships of marine turtles are not resolved yet. Bringing new data may help resolve these issues, and it is the exact reason why the genus Rhinochelys is being investigated. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (4 ULiège)
See detailLa radiation des tortues marines au Crétacé moyen
Scavezzoni, Isaure ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2017)

"Turtles" (Testudines) form a successful group of reptiles with several terrestrial, marine and fresh-water species. Their peculiar and somewhat constrained morphology (i. e. : carapace incorporating ribs ... [more ▼]

"Turtles" (Testudines) form a successful group of reptiles with several terrestrial, marine and fresh-water species. Their peculiar and somewhat constrained morphology (i. e. : carapace incorporating ribs, curved limbs, anapsid skull exempt of temporal fenestrae) and ecology has often obscured their relationships and, hence, their evolutionary history, notably in marine turtles (chelonioids). Modern chelonioids are divided in two clades (i. e. : shoft-shelled turtles and hard-shelled turtles) supported by distinct morphological and embryological characters. Their origin is traced back up to the Cretaceous, along with a series of extinct forms, many of which being collectively known as Protostegidae. Fossil evidence show that at least five clades of marine turtles were roaming the seas at the end of the Cretaceous. In fact, chelonioids appeared during the first stages of the Early Cretaceous and quickly exploded to reach a high level of disparity at the lowermost part of the late Cretaceous. Therefore, the Mesozoic radiation of chelonioids must have happened during the "middle" Cretaceous (especially the Aptian-Albian interval). However this radiation is poorly understood as the phylogenetic relationships of marine turtles are not resolved yet. Bringing new data may help resolve these issues, and it is the exact reason why the genus Rhinochelys is being investigated. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 66 (3 ULiège)
See detailNew data on the Mesozoic radiation of chelonioids
Scavezzoni, Isaure ULiege; Fischer, Valentin ULiege

Poster (2017, February)

"Turtles" (Testudines) form a successful group of reptiles with several terrestrial, marine and fresh-water species. Their peculiar and somewhat constrained morphology (i. e. : carapace incorporating ribs ... [more ▼]

"Turtles" (Testudines) form a successful group of reptiles with several terrestrial, marine and fresh-water species. Their peculiar and somewhat constrained morphology (i. e. : carapace incorporating ribs, curved limbs, anapsid skull exempt of temporal fenestrae) and ecology has often obscured their relationships and, hence, their evolutionary history, notably in marine turtles (chelonioids). Modern chelonioids are divided in two clades (i. e. : shoft-shelled turtles and hard-shelled turtles) supported by distinct morphological and embryological characters. Their origin is traced back up to the Cretaceous, along with a series of extinct forms, many of which being collectively known as Protostegidae. Fossil evidence show that at least five clades of marine turtles were roaming the seas at the end of the Cretaceous. In fact, chelonioids appeared during the first stages of the Early Cretaceous and quickly exploded to reach a high level of disparity at the lowermost part of the late Cretaceous. Therefore, the Mesozoic radiation of chelonioids must have happened during the "middle" Cretaceous (especially the Aptian-Albian interval). However this radiation is poorly understood as the phylogenetic relationships of marine turtles are not resolved yet. Bringing new data may help resolve these issues, and it is the exact reason why the genus Rhinochelys is being investigated. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (7 ULiège)