References of "Sara, M"
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See detailConsequence of past anthropogenic forest fragmentation on the genetic structure of European mammals: the example of the edible dormouse (Glis glis)
Michaux, Johan ULiege; Hurner, H.; Krystufek, B et al

in Biological Journal of the Linnean Society (in press)

The genetic structure of forest animal species may allow the spatial dynamics of the forests themselves to be tracked. Two scales of change are commonly discussed: changes in forest distribution during ... [more ▼]

The genetic structure of forest animal species may allow the spatial dynamics of the forests themselves to be tracked. Two scales of change are commonly discussed: changes in forest distribution during the Quaternary, due to glacial/ interglacial cycles, and current fragmentation related to habitat destruction. However, anthropogenic changes in forest distribution may have started well before the Quaternary, causing fragmentation at an intermediate time scale that is seldom considered. To explore the relative role of these processes, the genetic structure of a forest species with narrow ecological preferences, the edible dormouse (Glis glis), was investigated in a set of samples covering a large part of its Palaearctic distribution. Strong and complex geographical structure was revealed from the use of microsatellite markers. This structure suggests that fragmentation occurred in several steps, progressively splitting the ancestral population into peripheral isolated ones. The fact that this structure postdates post-glacial recolonization, together with dating based on microsatellite data, supports the hypothesis that the differentiation was recent, starting around 9000 years ago, and took place stepwise, possibly up to Medieval times. This complements a classic phylogeographical interpretation based on the effect of past climate change, and supports the role of anthropogenic deforestation as a trigger of recent intraspecific differentiation. [less ▲]

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See detailEvolutionary history and species delimitations: a case study of the hazel dormouse, Muscardinus avellanarius
Mouton, Alice ULiege; Mortelliti, A.; Grill, A. et al

in Conservation Genetics (2016)

Robust identification of species and significant evolutionary units (ESUs) is essential to implement appropriate conservation strategies for endangered species. However, definitions of species or ESUs are ... [more ▼]

Robust identification of species and significant evolutionary units (ESUs) is essential to implement appropriate conservation strategies for endangered species. However, definitions of species or ESUs are numerous and sometimes controversial, which might lead to biased conclusions, with serious consequences for the management of endangered species. The hazel dormouse, an arboreal rodent of conservation concern throughout Europe is an ideal model species to investigate the relevance of species identification for conservation purposes. This species is a member of the Gliridae family, which is protected in Europe and seriously threatened in the northern part of its range. We assessed the extent of genetic subdivision in the hazel dormouse by sequencing one mitochondrial gene (cytb) and two nuclear genes (BFIBR, APOB) and genotyping 10 autosomal microsatellites. These data were analysed using a combination of phylogenetic analyses and species delimitation methods. Multilocus analyses revealed the presence of two genetically distinct lineages (approximately 11 % cytb genetic divergence, no nuclear alleles shared) for the hazel dormouse in Europe, which presumably diverged during the Late Miocene. The phylogenetic patterns suggests that Muscardinus avellanarius populations could be split into two cryptic species respectively distributed in western and central-eastern Europe and Anatolia. However, the comparison of several species definitions and methods estimated the number of species between 1 and 10. Our results revealed the difficulty in choosing and applying an appropriate criterion and markers to identify species and highlight the fact that consensus guidelines are essential for species delimitation in the future. In addition, this study contributes to a better knowledge about the evolutionary history of the species. [less ▲]

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See detailNew insight in the evolutionary history of the common dormouse, Muscardinus avellanarius: a new cryptic species?
Mouton, alice; Grill, A; Mortelliti, A et al

in Conservation Genetics (2016)

Robust identification of species entities and evolutionary units is essential to implement appropriate conservation strategies for endangered species. However, definitions of species or evolutionary units ... [more ▼]

Robust identification of species entities and evolutionary units is essential to implement appropriate conservation strategies for endangered species. However, definitions of species or evolutionary units are numerous and sometimes controversial, which might lead to biased conclusions, with serious consequences for the management of endangered species. The hazel dormouse, an arboreal rodent of conservation concern throughout Europe is an ideal model species to investigate the relevance of species identification for conservation purposes. This species is a member of the Gliridae family, which is protected in Europe and seriously threatened in the northern part of its range. We assessed the extent of genetic subdivision in the hazel dormouse by sequencing one mitochondrial gene (cytb) and two nuclear genes (BFIBR, APOB) and genotyping 10 autosomal microsatellites. These data were analysed using a combination of phylogenetic analyses and species delimitation methods. Multilocus analyses revealed the presence of two genetically distinct (approximately 11% cyt b genetic divergence, no nuclear alleles shared) lineages for the hazel dormouse in Europe, which presumably diverged during the Late Miocene. The phylogenetic patterns suggests that M. avellanarius populations could be split into two cryptic species respectively distributed in western and central-eastern Europe and Anatolia. However, the comparison of several species definitions and methods estimated the number of species between 1 and 10. Our results revealed the difficulty in choosing and applying an appropriate criterion and markers to identify species and highlight the fact that consensus guidelines are essential for species delimitation in the future. In addition, this study contributes to a better knowledge about the evolutionary history of the species. [less ▲]

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See detailEvidence of a highly complex phylogeographic structure on a specialist river bird species, the dipper (Cinclus cinclus).
Hourlay, F.; Libois, Roland ULiege; D'Amico, F. et al

in Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution (2008), 49(2), 435-44

This study details the phylogeographic pattern of the white-throated dipper (Cinclus cinclus), a Palearctic, temperate, passerine bird that is exclusively associated with flowing water. Our results reveal ... [more ▼]

This study details the phylogeographic pattern of the white-throated dipper (Cinclus cinclus), a Palearctic, temperate, passerine bird that is exclusively associated with flowing water. Our results reveal a complex phylogeographic structure with at least five distinct lineages for the Western Palearctic region. As for many species of the Western Palearctic fauna and flora, this genetic structure is probably linked to the isolation of populations in different southern refuges during glacial periods. Furthermore, the isolation of populations in Scandinavia and/or Eastern regions, but also in Morocco and probably in Corsica, was accentuated by ecological and biogeographic barriers during Quaternary interglacial periods. During glacial periods, Italy, Sicily and the Balkano-Carpathian region acted as major refuge zones for the dipper. At the end of the last ice age, Western Europe was repopulated by dippers from an Italian refuge, while Eastern Europe was recolonised by Balkano-Carpathian birds. A large contact zone between these two lineages was evidenced and extends from Luxembourg to Hungary. Finally, our results indicate the need to clarify the taxonomic status of the dipper, especially concerning the European subspecies whose validity appears uncertain. [less ▲]

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See detailBody size increase in insular rodent populations: a role for predators?
Michaux, Johan ULiege; De Bellocq, J. G.; Sara, M. et al

in Global Ecology and Biogeography Letters (2002), 11(5), 427-436

Insular mammalian populations living in areas of small size are often characterized by a drastic change in body mass compared to related continental populations or species. Generally, small mammals (less ... [more ▼]

Insular mammalian populations living in areas of small size are often characterized by a drastic change in body mass compared to related continental populations or species. Generally, small mammals (less than 100 g) evolve into giant forms while large mammals (up to 100 g) evolve into dwarf forms. These changes, coupled with changes in other life, behavioural, physiological or demographic traits are referred to generally as the insular syndrome. We tested in this study the relative contribution of three factors - area of island, numbers of competitor species and number of predator species - to changes in body size of the woodmouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) in the Western Mediterranean Sea. Our results, based on a comparative analysis using the phylogenetic independent contrasts method, indicate that the increase in body size is related both to the decrease of island size and to the lower number of predator species. A decrease of competitor species does not seem to have an important effect. [less ▲]

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See detailOn the origin and systematics of the northern African wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) populations: a comparative study of mtDNA restriction patterns
Libois, Roland ULiege; Michaux, Johan ULiege; Ramalhinho, M. G. et al

in Canadian Journal of Zoology (2001), 79(8), 1503-1511

Conflicting hypotheses have been formulated regarding the origin of wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) populations in northern Africa. In this study, the mtDNA restriction patterns of mice (n = 28 ... [more ▼]

Conflicting hypotheses have been formulated regarding the origin of wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) populations in northern Africa. In this study, the mtDNA restriction patterns of mice (n = 28) collected in Tunisia and Morocco are compared with those of representatives from southern Europe (n = 102). The neighbour-joining tree confirms the existence of the three lineages previously found in the Mediterranean area: western, Tyrrhenian-Balkan, and Sicilian. The western group is isolated from the two others, with bootstrap values of 89 and 95%. Northern African patterns are included in the western group. Their variability is low, the same pattern being shared by five Tunisian and all Moroccan animals (n = 18), caught either in the north of the country (Cap Spartel) or in the south (Marrakech). This implies that northern African wood mouse populations have a southwestern European origin and that their presence in the region is probably recent, which corresponds to both paleontological data and the hypothesis of anthropogenic introduction. [less ▲]

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