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See detailUpdate on Ozone-Depleting Substances (ODSs) and Other Gases of Interest to the Montreal Protocol
Engel, A; Rigby, M; Burkholder, J et al

in Fahey, David W; Newman, Paul A; Pyle, John A (Eds.) et al Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion: 2018 (2019)

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See detailFaint-source-star planetary microlensing: The discovery of the cold gas-giant planet OGLE-2014-BLG-0676Lb
Rattenbury, N. J.; Bennett, D. P.; Sumi, T. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2017), 466(3), 2710-2717

We report the discovery of a planet - OGLE-2014-BLG-0676Lb- via gravitational microlensing. Observations for the lensing event were made by the following groups: Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of a planet - OGLE-2014-BLG-0676Lb- via gravitational microlensing. Observations for the lensing event were made by the following groups: Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics; Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment; Wise Observatory; RoboNET/Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope; Microlensing Network for the Detection of Small Terrestrial Exoplanets; and μ-FUN. All analyses of the light-curve data favour a lens system comprising a planetary mass orbiting a host star. The most-favoured binary lens model has a mass ratio between the two lens masses of (4.78 ± 0.13) × 10-3. Subject to some important assumptions, a Bayesian probability density analysis suggests the lens system comprises a 3.09-1.12+1.02 MJ planet orbiting a 0.62-0.22+0.20 M⊙ host star at a deprojected orbital separation of 4.40-1.46+2.16 au. The distance to the lens system is 2.22-0.83+0.96 kpc. Planet OGLE- 2014-BLG-0676Lb provides additional data to the growing number of cool planets discovered using gravitational microlensing against which planetary formation theories may be tested. Most of the light in the baseline of this event is expected to come from the lens and thus high-resolution imaging observations could confirm our planetary model interpretation. © 2016 The Authors. [less ▲]

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See detailSPITZER OBSERVATIONS of OGLE-2015-BLG-1212 REVEAL A NEW PATH TOWARD BREAKING STRONG MICROLENS DEGENERACIES
Bozza, V.; Shvartzvald, Y.; Udalski, A. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2016), 820(1),

Spitzer microlensing parallax observations of OGLE-2015-BLG-1212 decisively break a degeneracy between planetary and binary solutions that is somewhat ambiguous when only ground-based data are considered ... [more ▼]

Spitzer microlensing parallax observations of OGLE-2015-BLG-1212 decisively break a degeneracy between planetary and binary solutions that is somewhat ambiguous when only ground-based data are considered. Only eight viable models survive out of an initial set of 32 local minima in the parameter space. These models clearly indicate that the lens is a stellar binary system possibly located within the bulge of our Galaxy, ruling out the planetary alternative. We argue that several types of discrete degeneracies can be broken via such space-based parallax observations. © 2016. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.. [less ▲]

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See detailOGLE-2011-BLG-0265Lb: A jovian microlensing planet orbiting an m dwarf
Skowron, J.; Shin, I.-G.; Udalski, A. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2015), 804(1),

We report the discovery of a Jupiter-mass planet orbiting an M-dwarf star that gave rise to the microlensing event OGLE-2011-BLG-0265. Such a system is very rare among known planetary systems and thus the ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of a Jupiter-mass planet orbiting an M-dwarf star that gave rise to the microlensing event OGLE-2011-BLG-0265. Such a system is very rare among known planetary systems and thus the discovery is important for theoretical studies of planetary formation and evolution. High-cadence temporal coverage of the planetary signal, combined with extended observations throughout the event, allows us to accurately model the observed light curve. However, the final microlensing solution remains degenerate, yielding two possible configurations of the planet and the host star. In the case of the preferred solution, the mass of the planet is Mp = 0.9 ± 0.3 MJ, and the planet is orbiting a star with a mass M = 0.22 ± 0.06 M. The second possible configuration (2? away) consists of a planet with Mp = 0.6 ± 0.3 MJ and host star with M = 0.14 ± 0.06 M. The system is located in the Galactic disk 34 kpc toward the Galactic bulge. In both cases, with an orbit size of 1.52.0 AU, the planet is a cold Jupiterlocated well beyond the snow line of the host star. Currently available data make the secure selection of the correct solution difficult, but there are prospects for lifting the degeneracy with additional follow-up observations in the future, when the lens and source star separate. © 2015. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailRed noise versus planetary interpretations in the microlensing event ogle-2013-BLG-446
Bachelet, E.; Bramich, D. M.; Han, C. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2015), 812(2),

For all exoplanet candidates, the reliability of a claimed detection needs to be assessed through a careful study of systematic errors in the data to minimize the false positives rate. We present a method ... [more ▼]

For all exoplanet candidates, the reliability of a claimed detection needs to be assessed through a careful study of systematic errors in the data to minimize the false positives rate. We present a method to investigate such systematics in microlensing data sets using the microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0446 as a case study. The event was observed from multiple sites around the world and its high magnification (Amax ∼ 3000) allowed us to investigate the effects of terrestrial and annual parallax. Real-time modeling of the event while it was still ongoing suggested the presence of an extremely low-mass companion (∼3M) to the lensing star, leading to substantial follow-up coverage of the light curve. We test and compare different models for the light curve and conclude that the data do not favor the planetary interpretation when systematic errors are taken into account. © 2015. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.. [less ▲]

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See detailA giant planet beyond the snow line in microlensing event OGLE-2011-BLG-0251
Kains, N.; Street, R. A.; Choi, J.-Y. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 552

<BR /> Aims: We present the analysis of the gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2011-BLG-0251. This anomalous event was observed by several survey and follow-up collaborations conducting microlensing ... [more ▼]

<BR /> Aims: We present the analysis of the gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2011-BLG-0251. This anomalous event was observed by several survey and follow-up collaborations conducting microlensing observations towards the Galactic bulge. <BR /> Methods: Based on detailed modelling of the observed light curve, we find that the lens is composed of two masses with a mass ratio q = 1.9 × 10[SUP]-3[/SUP]. Thanks to our detection of higher-order effects on the light curve due to the Earth's orbital motion and the finite size of source, we are able to measure the mass and distance to the lens unambiguously. <BR /> Results: We find that the lens is made up of a planet of mass 0.53 ± 0.21 M[SUB]J[/SUB] orbiting an M dwarf host star with a mass of 0.26 ± 0.11 M[SUB]⊙[/SUB]. The planetary system is located at a distance of 2.57 ± 0.61 kpc towards the Galactic centre. The projected separation of the planet from its host star is d = 1.408 ± 0.019, in units of the Einstein radius, which corresponds to 2.72 ± 0.75 AU in physical units. We also identified a competitive model with similar planet and host star masses, but with a smaller orbital radius of 1.50 ± 0.50 AU. The planet is therefore located beyond the snow line of its host star, which we estimate to be around ~1-1.5 AU. [less ▲]

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