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See detailDiscovery of three new transiting hot Jupiters: WASP-161 b, WASP-163 b and WASP-170 b
Barkaoui, K.; Burdanov, Artem ULiege; Hellier, C. et al

in Astronomical Journal (2019), 157(2),

We present the discovery by the WASP-South transit survey of three new transiting hot Jupiters, WASP-161 b, WASP-163 b and WASP-170 b. Follow-up radial velocities obtained with the Euler/CORALIE ... [more ▼]

We present the discovery by the WASP-South transit survey of three new transiting hot Jupiters, WASP-161 b, WASP-163 b and WASP-170 b. Follow-up radial velocities obtained with the Euler/CORALIE spectrograph and high-precision transit light curves obtained with the TRAPPIST-North, TRAPPIST-South, SPECULOOS-South, NITES, and Euler telescopes have enabled us to determine the masses and radii for these transiting exoplanets. WASP-161\,b completes an orbit around its $V=11.1$ F6V-type host star in 5.406 days, and has a mass and radius of $2.5\pm 0.2$$M_{Jup}$ and $1.14\pm 0.06$ $R_{Jup}$ respectively. WASP-163\,b has an orbital period of 1.609 days, a mass of $1.9\pm0.2$ $M_{Jup}$, and a radius of $1.2\pm0.1$ $R_{Jup}$. Its host star is a $V=12.5$ G8-type dwarf. WASP-170\,b is on a 2.344 days orbit around a G1V-type star of magnitude $V=12.8$. It has a mass of $1.7\pm0.2$ $M_{Jup}$ and a radius of $1.14\pm0.09$ $R_{Jup}$. Given their irradiations ($\sim10^9$ erg.s$^{-1}$.cm$^{-2}$) and masses, the three new planets sizes are in good agreement with classical structure models of irradiated giant planets. [less ▲]

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See detailNew transiting hot Jupiters discovered by WASP-South, Euler/CORALIE, and TRAPPIST-South
Hellier, Coel; Anderson, D. R.; Bouchy, F. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2019), 482

We report the discovery of eight hot-Jupiter exoplanets from the WASP-South transit survey. WASP-144b has a mass of 0.44 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB], a radius of 0.85 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB], and is in a 2.27-d orbit around ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of eight hot-Jupiter exoplanets from the WASP-South transit survey. WASP-144b has a mass of 0.44 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB], a radius of 0.85 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB], and is in a 2.27-d orbit around a V = 12.9, K2 star which shows a 21-d rotational modulation. WASP-145Ab is a 0.89 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB] planet in a 1.77-d orbit with a grazing transit. The host is a V = 11.5, K2 star with a companion 5 arcsec away and 1.4 mag fainter. WASP-158b is a relatively massive planet at 2.8 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB] with a radius of 1.1 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB] and a 3.66-d orbit. It transits a V = 12.1, F6 star. WASP-159b is a bloated hot Jupiter (1.4 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB] and 0.55 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB]) in a 3.8-d orbit around a V = 12.9, F9 star. WASP-162b is a massive planet in a relatively long and highly eccentric orbit (5.2 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB], P = 9.6 d, e = 0.43). It transits a V = 12.2, K0 star. WASP-168b is a bloated hot Jupiter (0.42 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB]; 1.5 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB]) in a 4.15-d orbit with a grazing transit. The host is a V = 12.1, F9 star. WASP-172b is a bloated hot Jupiter (0.5 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB]; 1.6 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB]) in a 5.48-d orbit around a V = 11.0, F1 star. WASP-173Ab is a massive planet (3.7 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB]) with a 1.2 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB] radius in a circular orbit with a period of 1.39 d. The host is a V = 11.3, G3 star, being the brighter component of the double-star system WDS23366 - 3437, with a companion 6 arcsec away and 0.8 mag fainter. One of the two stars shows a rotational modulation of 7.9 d. [less ▲]

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See detailThe discovery of WASP-134b, WASP-134c, WASP-137b, WASP-143b and WASP-146b: three hot Jupiters and a pair of warm Jupiters orbiting Solar-type stars
Anderson, D. R.; Bouchy, F.; Brown, D. J. A. et al

E-print/Working paper (2018)

We report the discovery by WASP of five planets orbiting moderately bright ($V$ = 11.0-12.9) Solar-type stars. WASP-137b, WASP-143b and WASP-146b are typical hot Jupiters in orbits of 3-4 d and with ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery by WASP of five planets orbiting moderately bright ($V$ = 11.0-12.9) Solar-type stars. WASP-137b, WASP-143b and WASP-146b are typical hot Jupiters in orbits of 3-4 d and with masses in the range 0.68--1.11 $M_{\rm Jup}$. WASP-134 is a metal-rich ([Fe/H] = +0.40 $\pm$ 0.07]) G4 star orbited by two warm Jupiters: WASP-134b ($M_{\rm pl}$ = 1.41 $M_{\rm Jup}$; $P = 10.1$ d; $e = 0.15 \pm 0.01$; $T_{\rm eql}$ = 950 K) and WASP-134c ($M_{\rm pl} \sin i$ = 0.70 $M_{\rm Jup}$; $P = 70.0$ d; $e = 0.17 \pm 0.09$; $T_{\rm eql}$ = 500 K). From observations of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect of WASP-134b, we find its orbit to be misaligned with the spin of its star ($\lambda = -44 \pm 10^\circ$). WASP-134 is a rare example of a system with a short-period giant planet and a nearby giant companion. In-situ formation or disc migration seem more likely explanations for such systems than does high-eccentricity migration. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-166b: a bloated super-Neptune transiting a V = 9 star
Hellier, Coel; Anderson, D. R.; Triaud, A. H. M. J. et al

E-print/Working paper (2018)

We report the discovery of WASP-166b, a super-Neptune planet with a mass of 0.1 Mjup and a bloated radius of 0.63 Rjup. It transits a V = 9.36, F9V star in a 5.44-d orbit that is aligned with the stellar ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of WASP-166b, a super-Neptune planet with a mass of 0.1 Mjup and a bloated radius of 0.63 Rjup. It transits a V = 9.36, F9V star in a 5.44-d orbit that is aligned with the stellar rotation (lambda = -3 +/- 5 degrees). WASP-166b appears to be a rare object within the `Neptune desert'. The planet's low surface gravity and bright host star make it a promising target for atmospheric characterisation. There are variations in the radial-velocity measurements that might result from stellar magnetic activity. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-190b: Tomographic discovery of a transiting hot Jupiter
Temple, L. Y.; Hellier, C.; Anderson, D. R. et al

E-print/Working paper (2018)

We report the discovery of WASP-190b, an exoplanet on a 5.37-day orbit around an inflated F6 IV-V star with T_eff = 6400 $\pm$ 100 K, M$_{*}$ = 1.35 $\pm$ 0.05 M_sun and R$_{*}$ = 1.6 $\pm$ 0.1 R_sun. The ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of WASP-190b, an exoplanet on a 5.37-day orbit around an inflated F6 IV-V star with T_eff = 6400 $\pm$ 100 K, M$_{*}$ = 1.35 $\pm$ 0.05 M_sun and R$_{*}$ = 1.6 $\pm$ 0.1 R_sun. The planet has a radius of R_p = 1.15 $\pm$ 0.09 R_Jup and a mass of M_p = 1.0 $\pm$ 0.1 M_Jup, making it a mildly inflated hot Jupiter. The orbit is also marginally misaligned with respect to the stellar rotation, with $\lambda$ = 21 $\pm$ 6$^{\circ}$ measured using Doppler tomography. We compare a Rossiter-McLaughlin analysis (involving radial velocity measurements) with the Doppler tomography method, and find that the latter provides a better constraint on $vsini_{*}$ and $\lambda$. [less ▲]

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See detailDiscovery of WASP-174b: Doppler tomography of a near-grazing transit
Temple, L. Y.; Hellier, C.; Almleaky, Y. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2018), 480

We report the discovery and tomographic detection of WASP-174b, a planet with a near-grazing transit on a 4.23-d orbit around a V= 11.9, F6V star with [Fe/H] = 0.09 ± 0.09. The planet is in a moderately ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery and tomographic detection of WASP-174b, a planet with a near-grazing transit on a 4.23-d orbit around a V= 11.9, F6V star with [Fe/H] = 0.09 ± 0.09. The planet is in a moderately misaligned orbit with a sky-projected spin-orbit angle of λ = 31° ± 1°. This is in agreement with the known tendency for orbits around hotter stars to be misaligned. Owing to the grazing transit, the planet's radius is uncertain with a possible range of 0.8-1.8 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB]. The planet's mass has an upper limit of 1.3 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB]. WASP-174 is the faintest hot-Jupiter system so far confirmed by tomographic means. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-147b, 160Bb, 164b and 165b: two hot Saturns and two Jupiters, including two planets with metal-rich hosts
Lendl, M.; Anderson, D. R.; Bonfanti, Andrea ULiege et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2018)

We report the discovery of four transiting hot Jupiters, WASP-147, WASP-160B, WASP-164 and WASP-165 from the WASP survey. WASP-147b is a near Saturn-mass (M[SUB]P[/SUB] = 0.28M[SUB]J[/SUB]) object with a ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of four transiting hot Jupiters, WASP-147, WASP-160B, WASP-164 and WASP-165 from the WASP survey. WASP-147b is a near Saturn-mass (M[SUB]P[/SUB] = 0.28M[SUB]J[/SUB]) object with a radius of 1.11 R[SUB]J[/SUB] orbiting a G4 star with a period of 4.6 d. WASP-160Bb has a mass and radius (M[SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.28 M[SUB]J[/SUB], R[SUB]p[/SUB] = 1.09 R[SUB]J[/SUB]) near-identical to WASP-147b, but is less irradiated, orbiting a metal-rich ([Fe/H][SUB]*[/SUB] = 0.27) K0 star with a period of 3.8 d. WASP-160B is part of a near equal-mass visual binary with an on-sky separation of 28.5 arcsec. WASP-164b is a more massive (M[SUB]P[/SUB] = 2.13 M[SUB]J[/SUB], R[SUB]p[/SUB] = 1.13 R[SUB]J[/SUB]) hot Jupiter, orbiting a G2 star on a close-in (P = 1.8 d), but tidally stable orbit. WASP-165b is a classical (M[SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.66 M[SUB]J[/SUB], R[SUB]P[/SUB] = 1.26 R[SUB]J[/SUB]) hot Jupiter in a 3.5 d period orbit around a metal-rich ([Fe/H][SUB]*[/SUB] = 0.33) star. WASP-147b and WASP-160Bb are promising targets for atmospheric characterization through transmission spectroscopy, while WASP-164b presents a good target for emission spectroscopy. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-189b: an ultra-hot Jupiter transiting the bright A star HR 5599 in a polar orbit
Anderson, D. R.; Temple, L. Y.; Nielsen, L. D. et al

E-print/Working paper (2018)

We report the discovery of WASP-189b: an ultra-hot Jupiter in a 2.72-d transiting orbit around the $V = 6.6$ A star WASP-189 (HR 5599). We detected periodic dimmings in the star's lightcurve, first with ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of WASP-189b: an ultra-hot Jupiter in a 2.72-d transiting orbit around the $V = 6.6$ A star WASP-189 (HR 5599). We detected periodic dimmings in the star's lightcurve, first with the WASP-South survey facility then with the TRAPPIST-South telescope. We confirmed that a planet is the cause of those dimmings via line-profile tomography and radial-velocity measurements using the HARPS and CORALIE spectrographs. Those reveal WASP-189b to be an ultra-hot Jupiter ($M_{\rm P}$ = 2.13 $\pm$ 0.28 $M_{\rm Jup}$; $R_{\rm P}$ = 1.374 $\pm$ 0.082 $R_{\rm Jup}$) in a polar orbit ($\lambda = 89.3 \pm 1.4^\circ$; $\Psi = 90.0 \pm 5.8^\circ$) around a rapidly rotating A6IV-V star ($T_{\rm eff}$ = 8000 $\pm$ 100 K; $v_* \sin i_*$ $\approx$ 100 km\, s$^{-1}$). We calculate a predicted equilibrium temperature of $T_{\rm eql}$ = 2641 $\pm$ 34 K, assuming zero albedo and efficient redistribution, which is the third hottest for the known exoplanets. WASP-189 is the brightest known host of a transiting hot Jupiter and the third-brightest known host of any transiting exoplanet. We note that of the eight hot-Jupiter systems with $T_{\rm eff}$ $>$ 7000 K, seven have strongly misaligned orbits, and two of the three systems with $T_{\rm eff}$ $\geq$ 8000 K have polar orbits (the third is aligned). [less ▲]

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See detailA low-density hot Jupiter in a near-aligned, 4.5-day orbit around a $V$ = 10.8, F5V star
Anderson, D. R.; Bouchy, F.; Brown, D. J. A. et al

E-print/Working paper (2018)

We report the independent discovery and characterisation of a hot Jupiter in a 4.5-d, transiting orbit around the star TYC 7282-1298-1 ($V$ = 10.8, F5V). The planet has been pursued by the NGTS team as ... [more ▼]

We report the independent discovery and characterisation of a hot Jupiter in a 4.5-d, transiting orbit around the star TYC 7282-1298-1 ($V$ = 10.8, F5V). The planet has been pursued by the NGTS team as NGTS-2b and by ourselves as WASP-179b. We characterised the system using a combination of photometry from WASP-South and TRAPPIST-South, and spectra from CORALIE (around the orbit) and HARPS (through the transit). We find the planet's orbit to be nearly aligned with its star's spin. From a detection of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, we measure a projected stellar obliquity of $\lambda = -19 \pm 6^\circ$. From line-profile tomography of the same spectra, we measure $\lambda = -11 \pm 5^\circ$. We find the planet to have a low density ($M_{\rm P}$ = 0.67 $\pm$ 0.09 $M_{\rm Jup}$, $R_{\rm P}$ = 1.54 $\pm$ 0.06 $R_{\rm Jup}$), which, along with its moderately bright host star, makes it a good target for transmission spectroscopy. We find a lower stellar mass ($M_*$ = $1.30 \pm 0.07$ $M_\odot$) than reported by the NGTS team ($M_*$ = $1.64 \pm 0.21$ $M_\odot$), though the difference is only $1.5$ $\sigma$. [less ▲]

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See detailGaia Data Release 2. The celestial reference frame (Gaia-CRF2)
Gaia Collaboration; Mignard, F.; Klioner, S. A. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2018), 616(A), 14

Context. The second release of Gaia data (Gaia DR2) contains the astrometric parameters for more than half a million quasars. This set defines a kinematically non-rotating reference frame in the optical ... [more ▼]

Context. The second release of Gaia data (Gaia DR2) contains the astrometric parameters for more than half a million quasars. This set defines a kinematically non-rotating reference frame in the optical domain. A subset of these quasars have accurate VLBI positions that allow the axes of the reference frame to be aligned with the International Celestial Reference System (ICRF) radio frame. <BR /> Aims: We describe the astrometric and photometric properties of the quasars that were selected to represent the celestial reference frame of Gaia DR2 (Gaia-CRF2), and to compare the optical and radio positions for sources with accurate VLBI positions. <BR /> Methods: Descriptive statistics are used to characterise the overall properties of the quasar sample. Residual rotation and orientation errors and large-scale systematics are quantified by means of expansions in vector spherical harmonics. Positional differences are calculated relative to a prototype version of the forthcoming ICRF3. <BR /> Results: Gaia-CRF2 consists of the positions of a sample of 556 869 sources in Gaia DR2, obtained from a positional cross-match with the ICRF3-prototype and AllWISE AGN catalogues. The sample constitutes a clean, dense, and homogeneous set of extragalactic point sources in the magnitude range G ≃ 16 to 21 mag with accurately known optical positions. The median positional uncertainty is 0.12 mas for G < 18 mag and 0.5 mas at G = mag. Large- scale systematics are estimated to be in the range 20 to 30 μas. The accuracy claims are supported by the parallaxes and proper motions of the quasars in Gaia DR2. The optical positions for a subset of 2820 sources in common with the ICRF3-prototype show very good overall agreement with the radio positions, but several tens of sources have significantly discrepant positions. <BR /> Conclusions: Based on less than 40% of the data expected from the nominal Gaia mission, Gaia-CRF2 is the first realisation of a non-rotating global optical reference frame that meets the ICRS prescriptions, meaning that it is built only on extragalactic sources. Its accuracy matches the current radio frame of the ICRF, but the density of sources in all parts of the sky is much higher, except along the Galactic equator. [less ▲]

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See detailGaia Data Release 2. Observations of solar system objects
Gaia Collaboration; Spoto, F.; Tanga, P. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2018), 616(A), 13

Context. The Gaia spacecraft of the European Space Agency (ESA) has been securing observations of solar system objects (SSOs) since the beginning of its operations. Data Release 2 (DR2) contains the ... [more ▼]

Context. The Gaia spacecraft of the European Space Agency (ESA) has been securing observations of solar system objects (SSOs) since the beginning of its operations. Data Release 2 (DR2) contains the observations of a selected sample of 14,099 SSOs. These asteroids have been already identified and have been numbered by the Minor Planet Center repository. Positions are provided for each Gaia observation at CCD level. As additional information, complementary to astrometry, the apparent brightness of SSOs in the unfiltered G band is also provided for selected observations. <BR /> Aims: We explain the processing of SSO data, and describe the criteria we used to select the sample published in Gaia DR2. We then explore the data set to assess its quality. <BR /> Methods: To exploit the main data product for the solar system in Gaia DR2, which is the epoch astrometry of asteroids, it is necessary to take into account the unusual properties of the uncertainty, as the position information is nearly one-dimensional. When this aspect is handled appropriately, an orbit fit can be obtained with post-fit residuals that are overall consistent with the a-priori error model that was used to define individual values of the astrometric uncertainty. The role of both random and systematic errors is described. The distribution of residuals allowed us to identify possible contaminants in the data set (such as stars). Photometry in the G band was compared to computed values from reference asteroid shapes and to the flux registered at the corresponding epochs by the red and blue photometers (RP and BP). <BR /> Results: The overall astrometric performance is close to the expectations, with an optimal range of brightness G 12 - 17. In this range, the typical transit-level accuracy is well below 1 mas. For fainter asteroids, the growing photon noise deteriorates the performance. Asteroids brighter than G 12 are affected by a lower performance of the processing of their signals. The dramatic improvement brought by Gaia DR2 astrometry of SSOs is demonstrated by comparisons to the archive data and by preliminary tests on the detection of subtle non-gravitational effects. [less ▲]

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See detailGaia Data Release 2. Kinematics of globular clusters and dwarf galaxies around the Milky Way
Gaia Collaboration; Helmi, A.; van Leeuwen, F. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2018), 616(A), 12

Context. <BR /> Aims: The goal of this paper is to demonstrate the outstanding quality of the second data release of the Gaia mission and its power for constraining many different aspects of the dynamics ... [more ▼]

Context. <BR /> Aims: The goal of this paper is to demonstrate the outstanding quality of the second data release of the Gaia mission and its power for constraining many different aspects of the dynamics of the satellites of the Milky Way. We focus here on determining the proper motions of 75 Galactic globular clusters, nine dwarf spheroidal galaxies, one ultra-faint system, and the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. <BR /> Methods: Using data extracted from the Gaia archive, we derived the proper motions and parallaxes for these systems, as well as their uncertainties. We demonstrate that the errors, statistical and systematic, are relatively well understood. We integrated the orbits of these objects in three different Galactic potentials, and characterised their properties. We present the derived proper motions, space velocities, and characteristic orbital parameters in various tables to facilitate their use by the astronomical community. <BR /> Results: Our limited and straightforward analyses have allowed us for example to (i) determine absolute and very precise proper motions for globular clusters; (ii) detect clear rotation signatures in the proper motions of at least five globular clusters; (iii) show that the satellites of the Milky Way are all on high-inclination orbits, but that they do not share a single plane of motion; (iv) derive a lower limit for the mass of the Milky Way of 9.1[SUB]-2.6[/SUB][SUP]+6.2[/SUP] × 10[SUP]11[/SUP] M[SUB]☉[/SUB] based on the assumption that the Leo I dwarf spheroidal is bound; (v) derive a rotation curve for the Large Magellanic Cloud based solely on proper motions that is competitive with line-of-sight velocity curves, now using many orders of magnitude more sources; and (vi) unveil the dynamical effect of the bar on the motions of stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud. <BR /> Conclusions: All these results highlight the incredible power of the Gaia astrometric mission, and in particular of its second data release. Full Table D.3 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr">http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr</A> (<A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr">http://130.79.128.5</A>) or via <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz- bin/qcat?J/A+A/616/A12">http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz- bin/qcat?J/A+A/616/A12</A> [less ▲]

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See detailGaia Data Release 2. Mapping the Milky Way disc kinematics
Gaia Collaboration; Katz, D.; Antoja, T. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2018), 616(A), 11

Context. The second Gaia data release (Gaia DR2) contains high-precision positions, parallaxes, and proper motions for 1.3 billion sources as well as line-of-sight velocities for 7.2 million stars ... [more ▼]

Context. The second Gaia data release (Gaia DR2) contains high-precision positions, parallaxes, and proper motions for 1.3 billion sources as well as line-of-sight velocities for 7.2 million stars brighter than G[SUB]RVS[/SUB] = 12 mag. Both samples provide a full sky coverage. <BR /> Aims: To illustrate the potential of Gaia DR2, we provide a first look at the kinematics of the Milky Way disc, within a radius of several kiloparsecs around the Sun. <BR /> Methods: We benefit for the first time from a sample of 6.4 million F-G-K stars with full 6D phase-space coordinates, precise parallaxes (σ[SUB]ϖ[/SUB]/ϖ ≤ 20%), and precise Galactic cylindrical velocities (median uncertainties of 0.9-1.4 km s[SUP]-1[/SUP] and 20% of the stars with uncertainties smaller than 1 km s[SUP]-1[/SUP] on all three components). From this sample, we extracted a sub-sample of 3.2 million giant stars to map the velocity field of the Galactic disc from 5 kpc to 13 kpc from the Galactic centre and up to 2 kpc above and below the plane. We also study the distribution of 0.3 million solar neighbourhood stars (r < 200 pc), with median velocity uncertainties of 0.4 km s[SUP]-1[/SUP], in velocity space and use the full sample to examine how the over-densities evolve in more distant regions. <BR /> Results: Gaia DR2 allows us to draw 3D maps of the Galactocentric median velocities and velocity dispersions with unprecedented accuracy, precision, and spatial resolution. The maps show the complexity and richness of the velocity field of the galactic disc. We observe streaming motions in all the components of the velocities as well as patterns in the velocity dispersions. For example, we confirm the previously reported negative and positive galactocentric radial velocity gradients in the inner and outer disc, respectively. Here, we see them as part of a non-axisymmetric kinematic oscillation, and we map its azimuthal and vertical behaviour. We also witness a new global arrangement of stars in the velocity plane of the solar neighbourhood and in distant regions in which stars are organised in thin substructures with the shape of circular arches that are oriented approximately along the horizontal direction in the U - V plane. Moreover, in distant regions, we see variations in the velocity substructures more clearly than ever before, in particular, variations in the velocity of the Hercules stream. <BR /> Conclusions: Gaia DR2 provides the largest existing full 6D phase-space coordinates catalogue. It also vastly increases the number of available distances and transverse velocities with respect to Gaia DR1. Gaia DR2 offers a great wealth of information on the Milky Way and reveals clear non- axisymmetric kinematic signatures within the Galactic disc, for instance. It is now up to the astronomical community to explore its full potential. [less ▲]

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See detailGaia Data Release 2. Observational Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams
Gaia Collaboration; Babusiaux, C.; van Leeuwen, F. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2018), 616(A), 10

Context. Gaia Data Release 2 provides high-precision astrometry and three-band photometry for about 1.3 billion sources over the full sky. The precision, accuracy, and homogeneity of both astrometry and ... [more ▼]

Context. Gaia Data Release 2 provides high-precision astrometry and three-band photometry for about 1.3 billion sources over the full sky. The precision, accuracy, and homogeneity of both astrometry and photometry are unprecedented. <BR /> Aims: We highlight the power of the Gaia DR2 in studying many fine structures of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (HRD). Gaia allows us to present many different HRDs, depending in particular on stellar population selections. We do not aim here for completeness in terms of types of stars or stellar evolutionary aspects. Instead, we have chosen several illustrative examples. <BR /> Methods: We describe some of the selections that can be made in Gaia DR2 to highlight the main structures of the Gaia HRDs. We select both field and cluster (open and globular) stars, compare the observations with previous classifications and with stellar evolutionary tracks, and we present variations of the Gaia HRD with age, metallicity, and kinematics. Late stages of stellar evolution such as hot subdwarfs, post-AGB stars, planetary nebulae, and white dwarfs are also analysed, as well as low-mass brown dwarf objects. <BR /> Results: The Gaia HRDs are unprecedented in both precision and coverage of the various Milky Way stellar populations and stellar evolutionary phases. Many fine structures of the HRDs are presented. The clear split of the white dwarf sequence into hydrogen and helium white dwarfs is presented for the first time in an HRD. The relation between kinematics and the HRD is nicely illustrated. Two different populations in a classical kinematic selection of the halo are unambiguously identified in the HRD. Membership and mean parameters for a selected list of open clusters are provided. They allow drawing very detailed cluster sequences, highlighting fine structures, and providing extremely precise empirical isochrones that will lead to more insight in stellar physics. <BR /> Conclusions: Gaia DR2 demonstrates the potential of combining precise astrometry and photometry for large samples for studies in stellar evolution and stellar population and opens an entire new area for HRD- based studies. The full Table A.1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr">http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr</A> (<A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr">http://130.79.128.5</A>) or via <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz- bin/qcat?J/A+A/616/A10">http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz- bin/qcat?J/A+A/616/A10</A> [less ▲]

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See detailGaia Data Release 2. Summary of the contents and survey properties
Gaia Collaboration; Brown, A. G. A.; Vallenari, A. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2018), 616(A1), 1-22

Context. We present the second Gaia data release, Gaia DR2, consisting of astrometry, photometry, radial velocities, and information on astrophysical parameters and variability, for sources brighter than ... [more ▼]

Context. We present the second Gaia data release, Gaia DR2, consisting of astrometry, photometry, radial velocities, and information on astrophysical parameters and variability, for sources brighter than magnitude 21. In addition epoch astrometry and photometry are provided for a modest sample of minor planets in the solar system. <BR /> Aims: A summary of the contents of Gaia DR2 is presented, accompanied by a discussion on the differences with respect to Gaia DR1 and an overview of the main limitations which are still present in the survey. Recommendations are made on the responsible use of Gaia DR2 results. <BR /> Methods: The raw data collected with the Gaia instruments during the first 22 months of the mission have been processed by the Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC) and turned into this second data release, which represents a major advance with respect to Gaia DR1 in terms of completeness, performance, and richness of the data products. <BR /> Results: Gaia DR2 contains celestial positions and the apparent brightness in G for approximately 1.7 billion sources. For 1.3 billion of those sources, parallaxes and proper motions are in addition available. The sample of sources for which variability information is provided is expanded to 0.5 million stars. This data release contains four new elements: broad-band colour information in the form of the apparent brightness in the G[SUB]BP[/SUB] (330-680 nm) and G[SUB]RP[/SUB] (630-1050 nm) bands is available for 1.4 billion sources; median radial velocities for some 7 million sources are presented; for between 77 and 161 million sources estimates are provided of the stellar effective temperature, extinction, reddening, and radius and luminosity; and for a pre-selected list of 14 000 minor planets in the solar system epoch astrometry and photometry are presented. Finally, Gaia DR2 also represents a new materialisation of the celestial reference frame in the optical, the Gaia-CRF2, which is the first optical reference frame based solely on extragalactic sources. There are notable changes in the photometric system and the catalogue source list with respect to Gaia DR1, and we stress the need to consider the two data releases as independent. <BR /> Conclusions: Gaia DR2 represents a major achievement for the Gaia mission, delivering on the long standing promise to provide parallaxes and proper motions for over 1 billion stars, and representing a first step in the availability of complementary radial velocity and source astrophysical information for a sample of stars in the Gaia survey which covers a very substantial fraction of the volume of our galaxy. [less ▲]

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See detailThe HARPS search for southern extra-solar planets: XLIII. A compact system of four super-Earth planets orbiting HD 215152
Delisle, J.-B.; Ségransan, D.; Dumusque, X. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2018), 614

We report the discovery of four super-Earth planets around HD 215152, with orbital periods of 5.76, 7.28, 10.86, and 25.2 d, and minimum masses of 1.8, 1.7, 2.8, and 2.9 M· respectively. This discovery is ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of four super-Earth planets around HD 215152, with orbital periods of 5.76, 7.28, 10.86, and 25.2 d, and minimum masses of 1.8, 1.7, 2.8, and 2.9 M· respectively. This discovery is based on 373 high-quality radial velocity measurements taken by HARPS over 13 yr. Given the low masses of the planets, the signal-to-noise ratio is not sufficient to constrain the planet eccentricities. However, a preliminary dynamical analysis suggests that eccentricities should be typically lower than about 0.03 for the system to remain stable. With two pairs of planets with a period ratio lower than 1.5, with short orbital periods, low masses, and low eccentricities, HD 215152 is similar to the very compact multi-planet systems found by Kepler, which is very rare in radial-velocity surveys. This discovery proves that these systems can be reached with the radial-velocity technique, but characterizing them requires a huge amount of observations. © 2018 ESO. [less ▲]

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See detailThe discovery of WASP-151b, WASP-153b, WASP-156b: Insights on giant planet migration and the upper boundary of the Neptunian desert
Demangeon, O. D. S.; Faedi, F.; Hébrard, G. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2018), 610

To investigate the origin of the features discovered in the exoplanet population, the knowledge of exoplanets' mass and radius with a good precision (10%) is essential. To achieve this purpose the ... [more ▼]

To investigate the origin of the features discovered in the exoplanet population, the knowledge of exoplanets' mass and radius with a good precision (10%) is essential. To achieve this purpose the discovery of transiting exoplanets around bright stars is of prime interest. In this paper, we report the discovery of three transiting exoplanets by the SuperWASP survey and the SOPHIE spectrograph with mass and radius determined with a precision better than 15%. WASP-151b and WASP-153b are two hot Saturns with masses, radii, densities and equilibrium temperatures of 0.31-0.03 +0.04 MJ, 1.13-0.03 +0.03 RJ, 0.22-0.02 +0.03 ρJ and 1290-10 +20 K, and 0.39-0.02 +0.02 MJ, 1.55-0.08 +0.10 RJ, 0.11-0.02 +0.02 ρJ and 1700-40 +40 K, respectively. Their host stars are early G type stars (with mag V ~ 13) and their orbital periods are 4.53 and 3.33 days, respectively. WASP-156b is a super-Neptune orbiting a K type star (mag V = 11.6). It has a mass of 0.128-0.009 +0.010 MJ, a radius of 0.51-0.02 +0.02 RJ, a density of 1.0-0.1 +0.1 ρJ, an equilibrium temperature of 970-20 +30 K and an orbital period of 3.83 days. The radius of WASP-151b appears to be only slightly inflated, while WASP-153b presents a significant radius anomaly compared to a recently published model. WASP-156b, being one of the few well characterized super-Neptunes, will help to constrain the still debated formation of Neptune size planets and the transition between gas and ice giants. The estimates of the age of these three stars confirms an already observed tendency for some stars to have gyrochronological ages significantly lower than their isochronal ages. We propose that high eccentricity migration could partially explain this behavior for stars hosting a short period planet. Finally, these three planets also lie close to (WASP-151b and WASP-153b) or below (WASP-156b) the upper boundary of the Neptunian desert. Their characteristics support that the ultra-violet irradiation plays an important role in this depletion of planets observed in the exoplanet population. © 2018 ESO. [less ▲]

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See detailThe discoveries of WASP-91b, WASP-105b and WASP-107b: Two warm Jupiters and a planet in the transition region between ice giants and gas giants
Anderson, D. R.; Collier Cameron, A.; Delrez, L. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2017), 604

We report the discoveries of three transiting exoplanets. WASP-91b is a warm Jupiter (1.34 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB], 1.03 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB]) in a 2.8-day orbit around a metal-rich K3 star. WASP-105b is a warm ... [more ▼]

We report the discoveries of three transiting exoplanets. WASP-91b is a warm Jupiter (1.34 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB], 1.03 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB]) in a 2.8-day orbit around a metal-rich K3 star. WASP-105b is a warm Jupiter (1.8 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB], 0.96 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB]) in a 7.9-day orbit around a metal-rich K2 star. WASP-107b is a warm super-Neptune/sub-Saturn (0.12 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB], 0.94 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB]) in a 5.7-day orbit around a solar-metallicity K6 star. Considering that giant planets seem to be more common around stars of higher metallicity and stars of higher mass, it is notable that the hosts are all metal-rich, late-type stars. With orbital separations that place both WASP-105b and WASP-107b in the weak-tide regime, measurements of the alignment between the planets' orbital axes and their stars' spin axes may help us to understand the inward migration of short-period, giant planets. The mass of WASP-107b (2.2 M[SUB]Nep[/SUB], 0.40 M[SUB]Sat[/SUB]) places it in the transition region between the ice giants and gas giants of the Solar System. Its radius of 0.94 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB] suggests that it is a low-mass gas giant with a H/He-dominated composition. The planet thus sets a lower limit of 2.2 M[SUB]Nep[/SUB] on the planetary mass above which large gaseous envelopes can be accreted and retained by proto-planets on their way to becoming gas giants. We may discover whether WASP-107b more closely resembles an ice giant or a gas giant by measuring its atmospheric metallicity via transmission spectroscopy, for which WASP-107b is a very good target. Based on observations made with: the WASP-South photometric survey instrument, the 0.6-m TRAPPIST robotic imager, and the EulerCam camera and the CORALIE spectrograph mounted on the 1.2-m Euler-Swiss telescope.The photometric time-series and radial-velocity data used in this work are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr">http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr</A> (<A href="http://130.79.128.5">http://130.79.128.5</A>) or via <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/604/A110">http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/604/A110</A> [less ▲]

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See detailThe VLT/NaCo large program to probe the occurrence of exoplanets and brown dwarfs at wide orbits. IV. Gravitational instability rarely forms wide, giant planets
Vigan, A.; Bonavita, M.; Biller, B. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2017), 603

Understanding the formation and evolution of giant planets (≥1 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB]) at wide orbital separation (≥5 AU) is one of the goals of direct imaging. Over the past 15 yr, many surveys have placed ... [more ▼]

Understanding the formation and evolution of giant planets (≥1 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB]) at wide orbital separation (≥5 AU) is one of the goals of direct imaging. Over the past 15 yr, many surveys have placed strong constraints on the occurrence rate of wide-orbit giants, mostly based on non-detections, but very few have tried to make a direct link with planet formation theories. In the present work, we combine the results of our previously published VLT/NaCo large program with the results of 12 past imaging surveys to constitute a statistical sample of 199 FGK stars within 100 pc, including three stars with sub-stellar companions. Using Monte Carlo simulations and assuming linear flat distributions for the mass and semi-major axis of planets, we estimate the sub-stellar companion frequency to be within 0.75-5.70% at the 68% confidence level (CL) within 20-300 AU and 0.5-75 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB], which is compatible with previously published results. We also compare our results with the predictions of state-of-the-art population synthesis models based on the gravitational instability (GI) formation scenario with and without scattering. We estimate that in both the scattered and non-scattered populations, we would be able to detect more than 30% of companions in the 1-75 M[SUB]Jup[/SUB] range (95% CL). With the threesub-stellar detections in our sample, we estimate the fraction of stars that host a planetary system formed by GI to be within 1.0-8.6% (95% CL). We also conclude that even though GI is not common, it predicts a mass distribution of wide-orbit massive companions that is much closer to what is observed than what the core accretion scenario predicts. Finally, we associate the present paper with the release of the Direct Imaging Virtual Archive (DIVA), a public database that aims at gathering the results of past, present, and future direct imaging surveys. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile (ESO Large Program 184.C-0157 and Open Time 089.C-0137A and 090.C-0252A). [less ▲]

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See detailThe HARPS search for southern extra-solar planets. XXXVI. Eight HARPS multi-planet systems hosting 20 super-Earth and Neptune-mass companions
Udry, S.; Dumusque, X.; Lovis, C. et al

in arXiv e-prints (2017), 1705

We present radial-velocity measurement of eight stars observed with the HARPS Echelle spectrograph mounted on the 3.6-m telescope in La Silla (ESO, Chile). Data span more than ten years and highlight the ... [more ▼]

We present radial-velocity measurement of eight stars observed with the HARPS Echelle spectrograph mounted on the 3.6-m telescope in La Silla (ESO, Chile). Data span more than ten years and highlight the long-term stability of the instrument. We search for potential planets orbiting HD20003, HD20781, HD21693, HD31527, HD45184, HD51608, HD134060 and HD136352 to increase the number of known planetary systems and thus better constrain exoplanet statistics. After a preliminary phase looking for signals using generalized Lomb-Scargle periodograms, we perform a careful analysis of all signals to separate \emph{bona-fide} planets from spurious signals induced by stellar activity and instrumental systematics. We finally secure the detection of all planets using the efficient MCMC available on the Data and Analysis Center for Exoplanets (DACE web-platform), using model comparison whenever necessary. In total, we report the detection of twenty new super-Earth to Neptune-mass planets, with minimum masses ranging from 2 to 30 M$_{\rm Earth}$, and periods ranging from 3 to 1300 days. By including CORALIE and HARPS measurements of HD20782 to the already published data, we also improve the characterization of the extremely eccentric Jupiter orbiting this host. [less ▲]

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