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See detailEPOCA/EUR-OCEANS data compilation on the biological and biogeochemical responses to ocean acidification
Nisumaa, A.-M.; Pesant, S.; Bellerby, R.G.J. et al

in Earth System Science Data (2010), 2

The uptake of anthropogenic CO2 by the oceans has led to a rise in the oceanic partial pressure of CO2, and to a decrease in pH and carbonate ion concentration. This modification of the marine carbonate ... [more ▼]

The uptake of anthropogenic CO2 by the oceans has led to a rise in the oceanic partial pressure of CO2, and to a decrease in pH and carbonate ion concentration. This modification of the marine carbonate system is referred to as ocean acidification. Numerous papers report the effects of ocean acidification on marine organisms and communities but few have provided details concerning full carbonate chemistry and complementary observations. Additionally, carbonate system variables are often reported in different units, calculated using different sets of dissociation constants and on different pH scales. Hence the direct comparison of experimental results has been problematic and often misleading. The need was identified to (1) gather data on carbonate chemistry, biological and biogeochemical properties, and other ancillary data from published experimental data, (2) transform the information into common framework, and (3) make data freely available. The present paper is the outcome of an effort to integrate ocean carbonate chemistry data from the literature which has been supported by the European Network of Excellence for Ocean Ecosystems Analysis (EUR-OCEANS) and the European Project on Ocean Acidification (EPOCA). A total of 185 papers were identified, 100 contained enough information to readily compute carbonate chemistry variables, and 81 data sets were archived at PANGAEA – The Publishing Network for Geoscientific & Environmental Data. This data compilation is regularly updated as an ongoing mission of EPOCA. Data access: http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.735138 [less ▲]

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See detailA mathematical modelling of bloom of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi in a mesocosm experiment
Joassin, Pascal ULiege; Delille, Bruno ULiege; Soetaert, K. et al

in Biogeosciences Discussions (2008), 5

A dynamic model has been developed to represent biogeochemical variables and processes observed during a bloom of Emiliania huxleyi coccolithophore. This bloom was induced in a mesocosm experiment during ... [more ▼]

A dynamic model has been developed to represent biogeochemical variables and processes observed during a bloom of Emiliania huxleyi coccolithophore. This bloom was induced in a mesocosm experiment during which the ecosystem development was followed over a period of 23-days through changes in various biogeochemical parameters such as inorganic nutrients (nitrate, ammonium and phosphate), total alkalinity (TA), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), partial pressure of CO[SUB]2[/SUB] (pCO[SUB]2[/SUB]), dissolved oxygen (O[SUB]2[/SUB]), photosynthetic pigments, particulate organic carbon (POC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Transparent Exopolymer Particles (TEP), primary production, and calcification. This dynamic model is based on unbalanced algal growth and balanced bacterial growth. In order to adequately reproduce the observations, the model includes an explicit description of phosphorus cycling, calcification, TEP production and an enhanced mortality due to viral lysis. The model represented carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus fluxes observed in the mesocosms. Modelled profiles of algal biomass and final concentrations of DIC and nutrients are in agreement with the experimental observations. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of CO2 on particle size distribution and phytoplankton abundance during a mesocosm bloom experiment (PeECE II)
Engel, Anja; Schulz, K. G.; Riebesell, U. et al

in Biogeosciences (2008), 5(2), 509-521

The influence of seawater carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration on the size distribution of suspended particles (2-60 mu m) and on phytoplankton abundance was investigated during a mesocosm experiment at the ... [more ▼]

The influence of seawater carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration on the size distribution of suspended particles (2-60 mu m) and on phytoplankton abundance was investigated during a mesocosm experiment at the large scale facility (LFS) in Bergen, Norway, in the frame of the Pelagic Ecosystem CO2 Enrichment study (PeECE II). In nine outdoor enclosures the partial pressure of CO2 in seawater was modified by an aeration system to simulate past (similar to 190 mu atm CO2), present (similar to 370 mu atm CO2) and future (similar to 700 mu atm CO2) CO2 conditions in triplicates. Due to the initial addition of inorganic nutrients, phytoplankton blooms developed in all mesocosms and were monitored over a period of 19 days. Seawater samples were collected daily for analysing the abundance of suspended particles and phytoplankton with the Coulter Counter and with Flow Cytometry, respectively. During the bloom period, the abundance of small particles (< 4 mu m) significantly increased at past, and decreased at future CO2 levels. At that time, a direct relationship between the total-surface-to-total-volume ratio of suspended particles and DIC concentration was determined for all mesocosms. Significant changes with respect to the CO2 treatment were also observed in the phytoplankton community structure. While some populations such as diatoms seemed to be insensitive to the CO2 treatment, others like Micromonas spp. increased with CO2, or showed maximum abundance at present day CO2 (i.e. Emiliania huxleyi). The strongest response to CO2 was observed in the abundance of small autotrophic nano-plankton that strongly increased during the bloom in the past CO2 mesocosms. Together, changes in particle size distribution and phytoplankton community indicate a complex interplay between the ability of the cells to physiologically respond to changes in CO2 and size selection. Size of cells is of general importance for a variety of processes in marine systems such as diffusion-limited uptake of substrates, resource allocation, predator-prey interaction, and gravitational settling. The observed changes in particle size distribution are therefore discussed with respect to biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem functioning. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of the pCO2 level on microalgae. Comparison of past, present and futur situations during mesocosms experiments. II- species diversity of diatoms
Huonnic, P.; Martin-Jézéquel, V.; Rincé, Y. et al

Poster (2004, October)

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See detailImpact of the pCO2 level on microalgae. Comparison of past, present & futur situations during mesocosms experiments.
Martin-Jézéquel, V.; Huonnic, P.; Delille, Bruno ULiege et al

Poster (2004, October)

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See detailCO2 fertilization enhances carbon over-consumption during a phytoplankton bloom
Riebesell, U.; Bellerby, R.; Carbonnel, V. et al

Conference (2004, October)

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See detailPelagic Ecosystems in a High CO2 Ocean : the Mesocosm Approach
Riebesell, U.; Allgaier, M; Avgoustidi, V. et al

Poster (2004, October)

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See detailTransparent Exopolymer Particles (TEP) production by marine phytoplankton in response to increasing CO2 : laboratory and field mesocosm experiments
Engel, A.; Heemann, C.; Schartau, M. et al

Conference (2003, April)

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See detailPhytoplankton, bacteria and viruses: sources of CDOM in experimental mesocosms maintained under different pCO2 levels
Rochelle-Newall, E.; Delille, Bruno ULiege; Gattuso, J.-P. et al

Poster (2003, April)

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