References of "Remacle, Angélique"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailListening to a dysphonic speaker in noise may impede children’s spoken language processing in a realistic classroom setting
Schiller, Isabel ULiege; Morsomme, Dominique ULiege; Kob, Malte et al

in Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools (in press)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate children’s processing of dysphonic speech in a realistic classroom setting, under the influence of added classroom noise. Method: Normally developing 6 ... [more ▼]

Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate children’s processing of dysphonic speech in a realistic classroom setting, under the influence of added classroom noise. Method: Normally developing 6-year-old primary-school children performed two listening tasks in their regular classrooms: a phoneme discrimination task to assess speech perception, and a sentence-picture matching task to assess listening comprehension. Speech stimuli were played back in either a normal or an impaired voice quality. Children performed the tasks in the presence of induced classroom noise at signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) between +2 and +9 dB. Results: Children’s performance in the phoneme discrimination task decreased significantly when the speaker’s voice was impaired. The effect of voice quality on sentence-picture matching depended on task demands: easy sentences were processed more accurately in the impaired-voice condition than in the normal-voice conditions. SNR effects are discussed in light of methodological constraints. Conclusions: Listening to a dysphonic teacher in a noisy classroom may impede children’s perception of speech, particularly when phonological discrimination is needed to disambiguate the speech input. Future research regarding the interaction of voice quality and task demands is necessary. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (1 ULiège)
See detailCommuniquer et enseigner avec un masque : Comment (s’)en sortir ?
Henrich Bernardoni, Nathalie; Remacle, Angélique ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2020)

Après avoir rapidement exploré les conditions de port du masque imposées aux enseignants français et belges en lien avec la crise sanitaire du COVID-19, nous discuterons de l’impact du masque sur la ... [more ▼]

Après avoir rapidement exploré les conditions de port du masque imposées aux enseignants français et belges en lien avec la crise sanitaire du COVID-19, nous discuterons de l’impact du masque sur la capacité à communiquer et à interagir avec les élèves. Comment impacte-t-il la respiration ? De quelle façon modifie-t-il la parole transmise et la parole reçue ? Nous finirons en explorant les adaptations possibles à cette situation de port de masque pour l’enseignant et son environnement. Nous donnerons des conseils pratiques à mettre en place au quotidien pour limiter l’effort vocal de l’enseignant et favoriser la compréhension de ses élèves. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 113 (7 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNoise and a speaker’s impaired voice quality disrupt spoken language processing in school-aged children: Evidence from performance and response time measures
Schiller, Isabel ULiege; Morsomme, Dominique ULiege; Kob, Malte et al

in Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research (2020)

Purpose: Our aim was to investigate isolated and combined effects of speech-shaped noise (SSN) and a speaker’s impaired voice quality on spoken language processing in first-grade children. Method: In ... [more ▼]

Purpose: Our aim was to investigate isolated and combined effects of speech-shaped noise (SSN) and a speaker’s impaired voice quality on spoken language processing in first-grade children. Method: In individual examinations, 53 typically developing children aged 5 to 6 years performed a speech perception task (phoneme discrimination) and a listening comprehension task (sentence-picture matching). Speech stimuli were randomly presented in a 2x2 factorial design with the factors noise (no added noise vs. SSN at 0 dB signal-to-noise ratio) and voice quality (normal voice vs. impaired voice). Outcome measures were task performance and response time (RT). Results: SSN and impaired voice quality significantly lowered children’s performance and increased RTs in the speech perception task, particularly when combined. Regarding listening comprehension, a significant interaction between noise and voice quality indicated that children’s performance was hindered by SSN when the speaker’s voice was impaired but not when it was normal. RTs in this task were unaffected by noise or voice quality. Conclusions: Results suggest that speech signal degradations caused by a speaker’s impaired voice and background noise generate more processing errors and increased listening effort in young school-aged children. This finding is vital for classroom listening and highlights the importance of ensuring teachers’ vocal health and adequate room acoustics. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 84 (22 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSPEAKinVR: validation of a virtual audience
Etienne, Elodie ULiege; Leclercq, Anne-Lise ULiege; Remacle, Angélique ULiege et al

Conference (2020, April 30)

The main goal of this paper is to validate a virtual reality environment for public speaking training. Following Slater’s terminology (2003), there are two important concepts in VR: “immersion which ... [more ▼]

The main goal of this paper is to validate a virtual reality environment for public speaking training. Following Slater’s terminology (2003), there are two important concepts in VR: “immersion which stands for what the technology delivers from an objective point of view” and presence which is “the human reaction to immersion”, i.e., the participant’s subjective sense of being in the virtual place. The reactions of the audience can have a significant impact on the speaker’s emotions and performance. At a first level, our hypothesis is that interactivity has a positive impact on the presence feeling. At a higher level, as already shown by Chollet et al. (2015), interactivity in VR is also a major ingredient in the training process. It is therefore essential to know if the users perceive the interactions in the virtual environment as representative of the reality and how each one is interpreted. There are two main dimensions in the context of emotion and affect: arousal and valence. As defined by Chollet and Scherer (2017), “arousal can be understood as an audience member’s level of alertness, and valence corresponds to how positively or negatively the person feels toward the speaker or the presentation”. In their paper, they tried to understand how users perceive virtual audience based on the nonverbal behavior of audience members. Our first question is to investigate which attitudes the characters must display and how people perceive the individual members of the audience in terms of their states of arousal and valence. A second related question is linked to the level of reality used to represent the public. The characters in virtual environments, i.e. avatars, are most often synthetic images. In some cases, photorealistic representations are used but the level of animation is then generally extremely limited. In this context, our second research question investigates whether the use of fully rigged 3D photogrammetric models, i.e. with a skeleton we can animate, can significantly improve the user’s presence. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (8 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailSPEAKInVR : Validation d’une audience virtuelle
Etienne, Elodie ULiege; Leclercq, Anne-Lise ULiege; Remacle, Angélique ULiege et al

Scientific conference (2020, March 12)

Nowadays public speaking is one of the most important skills a person should develop. Such a skill is vital in many circumstances and in very different fields: the sales representative who presents a ... [more ▼]

Nowadays public speaking is one of the most important skills a person should develop. Such a skill is vital in many circumstances and in very different fields: the sales representative who presents a product to customers, the tourist guide visiting a city with a group, the manager who defends his project in front of stakeholders, the candidate during a job interview, the professor in front of students… Unfortunately, many firms complain about the too low level of this skill within their staff. The global theme of our work is to look for innovative solutions leading to an improvement of public speaking performances. The global project aims to help people to speak in public by training them in a realistic and interactive VR environment providing some feedbacks. Unity 3D engine was used to create a first basic version of the tool. 3D avatars have been designed and animated to represent some common audience postures, corresponding to different degrees of arousal and valence, and some classical situations as people typing on laptops or playing with smartphones. 3D photogrammetric versions of these avatars will soon be completed for testing increased realism. The objective of this presentation is to validate the virtual audience. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 118 (56 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe effects of noise and impaired voice quality on spoken language processing in school-aged children: Preliminary results of a systematic review
Schiller, Isabel ULiege; Remacle, Angélique ULiege; Durieux, Nancy ULiege et al

Poster (2020, January 10)

At school, children often face challenging listening conditions due to high noise levels or because they are exposed to dysphonic speakers. To date, no comprehensive review has evaluated how this might ... [more ▼]

At school, children often face challenging listening conditions due to high noise levels or because they are exposed to dysphonic speakers. To date, no comprehensive review has evaluated how this might affect spoken language processing (SLP). Our aim was to systematically review the literature on the effects of noise and/or impaired voice quality on regular school-aged children's SLP. Eligibility was restricted to studies that assessed 6-18 year-old children’s performance and response times in listening tasks presented in noise and/or an impaired voice quality. We searched Medline/Ovid, PsycINFO/Ovid, Eric/Ovid, and Scopus up to August 2018. Risk of bias was determined using an adapted version of the NIH Quality Assessment Tool for Observational Cohort and Cross-Sectional Studies. We classified and discussed findings in the light of three SLP components: speech perception, listening comprehension, and auditory working memory. We identified 24 eligible studies on the effect of noise (n=14), impaired voice (n=8), and the combination of noise and impaired voice (n=2). Sixteen of these studies were evaluated to be of good quality, eight of fair quality. For each SLP component, there was evidence for the disruptive effect of either noise or impaired voice on task performance or response times. However, there was no indication of an interaction between noise and impaired voice. Results from our systematic review suggest that acoustic degradations may impede children’s speech perception, comprehension of spoken language, and ability to retain speech-encoded information. This has important implications for the educational setting and highlights the need for improved listening conditions in learning spaces. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 70 (10 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailVocal characteristics of 5-year-old children: Proposed normative values based on a French-speaking population
Remacle, Angélique ULiege; Genel, Ysaline; Segers, Magali et al

in Logopedics, Phoniatrics, Vocology (2020), 45(1), 30-38

Purpose: Previous research proposed normative data on gender- and age-specific voice acoustics for adults. Such reference values are lacking for children, particularly under the age of 6. This study was ... [more ▼]

Purpose: Previous research proposed normative data on gender- and age-specific voice acoustics for adults. Such reference values are lacking for children, particularly under the age of 6. This study was intended (1) to collect reliable normative data for the acoustic parameters of 5-year-old children’s voices, and (2) to investigate potential gender-specific differences. Study: Prospective and cross-sectional. Methods: Acoustic analyses were done on the voices of 53 normophonic children (26 girls; 27 boys) aged 5;0 to 5;11 years, using Praat software. The fundamental frequency, local jitter, local shimmer, and noise-to-harmonics ratio (NHR) were measured on the sustained vowels [a], [i], and [u]. The highest frequency, lowest frequency, and frequency range were measured using ascending and descending glissandi on the vowel [a]. Results: For the three sustained vowels, the mean fundamental frequency ranged from 255 Hz to 277 Hz, mean jitter ranged from 0.394% to 0.591%, mean shimmer ranged from 2.571% to 5.824%, and mean NHR ranged from 0.009 to 0.034. The frequency range was from 190 Hz to 750 Hz, which corresponds to 23.7 semitones. No gender difference was found, except for NHR on the vowel [a]. Conclusions: The lack of gender differences – other than for NHR on the vowel [a] – led us to propose mixed norms for 5-year-old boys and girls combined. Implications: These normative data will allow clinicians to compare children’s voice assessments to specific references in order to enhance diagnostic accuracy and measure therapy outcomes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 98 (23 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailSimuler pour mieux communiquer, ou comment le virtuel vient en aide à l’enseignement
Remacle, Angélique ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2019)

En écho à la journée mondiale de la voix, MGEN vous invite à une après-midi interactive, enjouée et passionnante. Expérimentations, démonstrations pratiques, numéros artistiques ponctueront les ... [more ▼]

En écho à la journée mondiale de la voix, MGEN vous invite à une après-midi interactive, enjouée et passionnante. Expérimentations, démonstrations pratiques, numéros artistiques ponctueront les communications scientifiques centrées sur les aspects concrets de la santé vocale. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (10 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhat did you say? Children’s spoken language processing in noise and speaker’s poor voice
Schiller, Isabel ULiege; Morsomme, Dominique ULiege; Kob, Malte et al

Conference (2019, December 10)

The rational of this study was to assess separate and combined effects of background noise and speaker’s impaired voice quality (i.e. dysphonia) on children’s spoken language processing. Fifty-three 5-6 ... [more ▼]

The rational of this study was to assess separate and combined effects of background noise and speaker’s impaired voice quality (i.e. dysphonia) on children’s spoken language processing. Fifty-three 5-6 year-old children individually performed a speech perception task and a listening comprehension task in a 2x2 factorial design with the factors noise (no noise / noise at 0 dB signal-to-noise ratio) and voice quality (normophonic speaker/dysphonic speaker). We measured children’s task performance and response times (RT) in these tasks. Noise and impaired voice significantly lowered performance and prolonged RT in speech perception, especially when combined. For listening comprehension, we found a significant interaction between noise and voice quality on task performance: Noise lowered performance, but only in the case of the dysphonic voice. Results highlight that noise and impaired voice may negatively affect children’s spoken language processing in different processing areas, with the effect being most pronounced when the two factors occur together. This has relevance for the educational setting, because classrooms are typically noisy and there is a high prevalence of voice problems among teachers. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (5 ULiège)
See detailLe biofeedback : Quelles applications en thérapie vocale ?
Remacle, Angélique ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2019)

Depuis une dizaine d'années, le monitoring de la voix du patient en dehors de la consultation orthophonique est possible grâce à un outil transportable et simple d’usage : le dosimètre. Cet outil permet ... [more ▼]

Depuis une dizaine d'années, le monitoring de la voix du patient en dehors de la consultation orthophonique est possible grâce à un outil transportable et simple d’usage : le dosimètre. Cet outil permet de mesurer la fréquence et l’intensité de la voix, ainsi que la durée de phonation au cours des activités quotidiennes. Outre l’accumulation de la voix en contexte écologique, le dosimètre permet de donner un feedback au patient sur son utilisation vocale. En pratique, le clinicien configure l’appareil de sorte qu’il fournisse un signal en temps réel lorsque le patient adopte un comportement vocal inadéquat. Ainsi, le feedback permet de conscientiser un comportement spécifique et aide l’individu à le modifier. Dans cet atelier, nous discutons des applications cliniques de cet outil. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (3 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailChildren’s perception of degraded speech at normal vs. fast speech rate
Schiller, Isabel ULiege; Morsomme, Dominique ULiege; Kob, Malte et al

in Ochmann, Martin (Ed.) Proceedings of the 23rd International Congress on Acoustics, integrating 4th EAA Euroregio 2019 (2019, September 12)

This study investigated the effect of degraded listening conditions and speech rate on children’s answer accuracy and response time in a speech perception task. Fifty-three normally-developing children ... [more ▼]

This study investigated the effect of degraded listening conditions and speech rate on children’s answer accuracy and response time in a speech perception task. Fifty-three normally-developing children (aged 5-6 years) listened to 72 pseudo-word pairs presented at two different speech rates (normal and fast) and four different listening conditions (normal voice in silence [control], dysphonic voice in silence, normal voice in speech-shaped noise (SSN) at 0 dBA SNR, and dysphonic voice in SSN at 0 dBA SNR). The participants had to decide whether the pseudo-words were the same (e.g. /filam/ - /filam/) or different (e.g. /mafin/ - /nafin/). For either speech rate, degraded listening conditions were found to significantly decrease answer accuracy. Regarding response time, speech rate interacted with listening condition: At fast as opposed to normal speech rate, children responded slower to normal voice in SSN but faster to the three other listening conditions. Our findings suggest that speech signal degradations may disrupt children’s speech perception even at normal speed. Speech rate might influence the extent of listening effort associated with adverse listening conditions. A good quality and adequate transmission of the speech signal may help children to listen effectively. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (10 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImitating dysphonic Voice: A suitable Technique to create Speech Stimuli for Spoken Language Processing Tasks?
Schiller, Isabel ULiege; Remacle, Angélique ULiege; Morsomme, Dominique ULiege

in Logopedics, Phoniatrics, Vocology (2019)

The aim of this study was to assess the suitability of imitated dysphonic voice samples for their application in listening tasks investigating the impact of speakers’ voice quality on spoken language ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to assess the suitability of imitated dysphonic voice samples for their application in listening tasks investigating the impact of speakers’ voice quality on spoken language processing. A female voice expert recorded speech samples (sustained vowels and connected speech) in her normal voice and while imitating a dysphonic voice. Voice characteristics, authenticity, and consistency of the two voice qualities were evaluated by means of acoustic measurements (Acoustic Voice Quality Index [AVQI], Jitter, Shimmer, Harmonics-to-Noise Ratio [HNR]) and perceptual evaluation (GRBAS scale, consistency, and authenticity rated by five Speech-Language-Pathologists). Based on acoustic and perceptual assessments, the degree of voice impairment for the imitated dysphonic voice was found to be moderate to severe. Roughness and asthenia were the predominant perceptual features. The perceptual rating indicated a high consistency and acceptable authenticity of the imitated dysphonic voice. Results suggest that an imitation of dysphonic voice quality may closely resemble the voice characteristics typically found in dysphonic patients. The voice samples validated here shall be applied in future listening tasks and may promote our understanding of how dysphonic speech is processed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 76 (31 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailCan dysphonia be mimicked authentically? An acoustic and perceptual evaluation of imitated dysphonic speech samples
Schiller, Isabel ULiege; Remacle, Angélique ULiege; Morsomme, Dominique ULiege

Conference (2019, August 28)

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a healthy speaker can authentically imitate dysphonia. Mimicked dysphonic speech samples were assessed acoustically and perceptually. Evaluation was ... [more ▼]

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a healthy speaker can authentically imitate dysphonia. Mimicked dysphonic speech samples were assessed acoustically and perceptually. Evaluation was based on recordings of sustained vowels and connected speech produced by a female voice therapist. The speaker first used her normal voice and then mimicked a dysphonic voice. Acoustic assessment was performed with Praat (AVQI, Jitter, Shimmer, and HNR). Perceptual assessment was conducted by five Speech Language Pathologists. After listening to the speaker’s normophonic and mimicked dysphonic samples, they performed GRBAS ratings as well as authenticity and consistency ratings using a four-point scale. Results showed a moderate to severe degree of voice impairment for the mimicked dysphonic voice, with an AVQI score of 6.8. The mimicked dysphonic voice was predominantly perceived as rough (Median = 3) and asthenic (Median = 3). Authenticity and consistency were rated as acceptable and high respectively. This indicates that the speaker’s imitation of dysphonic voice was realistic and that she successfully maintained the same voice quality throughout the recording. Regarding the applications, we argue that imitation of dysphonic voice performed by a voice expert may be a useful method for investigating the effects of dysphonic voice on listeners’ spoken language processing. Speech samples validated in this study shall be used for future listening experiments and may improve our understanding of how speakers’ voice quality affects the listening experience. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (10 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailValidation of a virtual environment for learning vocal skills
Remacle, Angélique ULiege; Morsomme, Dominique ULiege

Conference (2019, June 25)

In health care, there is incredible potential for new technologies (AR, VR…) in both the medical and psychological fields. For their application as diagnostic and treatment tools, scientific validation is ... [more ▼]

In health care, there is incredible potential for new technologies (AR, VR…) in both the medical and psychological fields. For their application as diagnostic and treatment tools, scientific validation is essential with respect to evidence-based practice. The scientific approach is 1) to assess the benefits of such new technologies over other existing methods, and 2) to detect potential adverse effects (e.g. cybersickness for VR technologies). This presentation focuses on the validation of a VR environment within the field of speech therapy, which is designed for teachers’ voice care. During the training sessions, the application is used to help teachers acquire appropriate vocal skills and practice these skills in a simulated teaching context. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (17 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailListe limitative des tests logopédiques pour l'évaluation des troubles de la voix : Ajout de normes de fréquence fondamentale pour les enfants de 5 ans
Remacle, Angélique ULiege

Article for general public (2019)

L’évaluation logopédique d’un trouble vocal fait suite à un examen laryngé réalisé par un médecin ORL. En accord avec les lignes de conduite proposées par la Société Européenne de Laryngologie, le bilan ... [more ▼]

L’évaluation logopédique d’un trouble vocal fait suite à un examen laryngé réalisé par un médecin ORL. En accord avec les lignes de conduite proposées par la Société Européenne de Laryngologie, le bilan logopédique se veut multiparamétrique. Selon la liste limitative des tests de l’INAMI, ce bilan comporte à minima - une analyse perceptive réalisée par le clinicien avec l’échelle GRBAS, - une auto-évaluation de la qualité de vie liée à la voix avec le questionnaire Voice Handicap Index ou le questionnaire des symptômes vocaux chez les enfants, - des mesures objectives acoustiques, telles que la fréquence fondamentale de la voix (F0), l’index de sévérité de la dysphonie DSI, ou encore l’index de qualité vocale AVQI. La mesure de fréquence fondamentale réalisée sur la voyelle soutenue [a] est comparée à des valeurs de référence selon l’âge et le genre (De Bodt, Heylen, Mertens, Vanderwegen & Van de Heyning, 2008). Jusqu’alors, des normes étaient disponibles dès l’âge de 6 ans. Afin d’offrir des points de repères pour les enfants plus jeunes, Remacle, Genel, Segers et de Bodt (2019) ont publié des normes acoustiques pour la tranche de 5 ans. Cet article rend compte de l'ajout de ces nouvelles normes dans la liste limitative des tests logopédiques pour l'évaluation des troubles de la voix. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 127 (4 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailL’analyse acoustique des voix d’enfants de 5 ans : Proposition de valeurs de référence pour les logiciels PRAAT et VOCALAB
Sicard, Etienne; Meyrieux, Léa; Moreau, Mathilde et al

Poster (2019, May 14)

En clinique, les mesures acoustiques d’une voix sont comparées à des normes correspondant au genre, à l’âge et à la langue de l’individu. De telles normes sont disponibles pour les adultes mais sont plus ... [more ▼]

En clinique, les mesures acoustiques d’une voix sont comparées à des normes correspondant au genre, à l’âge et à la langue de l’individu. De telles normes sont disponibles pour les adultes mais sont plus rares pour les enfants, particulièrement les francophones en-deçà de 6 ans. Pour répondre à ce manque, Remacle et collaborateurs (2019) ont constitué un corpus de voix de 53 enfants normophoniques de 5 ans (26 filles ; 27 garçons), comportant la production des voyelles /a/, /i/, /u/ tenues. A partir de ce corpus, des valeurs de références pour les paramètres acoustiques ont été établies sous PRAAT (Remacle et al., 2019) et VOCALAB (Meyrieux & Moreau, 2018). L’objectif de cette étude est d’identifier les points de convergence/divergence entre les paramètres obtenus à l’aide des deux logiciels, sur base du corpus décrit ci-dessus. Compte tenu de l’absence de différence de l’appareil vocal (Cartei et al., 2014) et des paramètres acoustiques à 5 ans (Remacle et al., 2019), nous proposons une analyse groupée pour les filles et les garçons. Sur PRAAT, la F0 (méthode d’auto-corrélation), le shimmer, le Jitter et le NHR ont été extrait sur une portion stable d’une seconde au milieu de la voyelle tenue. Sur VOCALAB, les paramètres correspondants ont été extraits sur l'ensemble de la voyelle (Tableau 1). L’analyse du F0 montre une corrélation très forte des valeurs obtenues avec PRAAT et VOCALAB. Des différences importantes sont observées entre les indicateurs d’instabilité en fréquence et en amplitude des deux logiciels. Ces différences s’expliquent par le calcul court terme de PRAAT (à l’échelle d’un à dix cycles, d’une durée de quelques dizaines de ms) et le calcul combinant le court, moyen (100 ms) et long terme (1 sec) de VOCALAB, ainsi que par la portion du signal analysée (1 sec sur PRAAT et la voyelle entière sur VOCALAB). En revanche, le NHR de PRAAT et le rapport bruit/signal de VOCALAB montrent une corrélation négligeable à modérée selon la voyelle analysée. Ces résultats sont très proches de ceux obtenus pour des voix adultes précédemment publiés (Sicard & Menin-Sicard, 2013). L’analyse acoustique des voix d’enfants de 5 ans aura permis d'intégrer des repères d'indicateurs d'altération de la voix de jeunes enfants dans VOCALAB, sous forme d’un recoloriage des seuils voix normale/altérée (Figure 1). L’extrapolation entre les repères de l’enfant de 5 ans jusqu’à la puberté justifie toutefois la construction d’un corpus d’enfants âgés de 4 à 12 ans pour affiner les repères. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (4 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailQuels facteurs individuels peuvent prédire la charge vocale des enseignants ?
Remacle, Angélique ULiege; De Chambourcy, Laetitia; Lefèvre, Nathalie

Conference (2019, May 14)

Introduction : Au cours de leur carrière, plus de la moitié des enseignants développent des troubles de la voix (Van Houtte et al., 2011). Il s’agit principalement de phonotraumatismes consécutifs à une ... [more ▼]

Introduction : Au cours de leur carrière, plus de la moitié des enseignants développent des troubles de la voix (Van Houtte et al., 2011). Il s’agit principalement de phonotraumatismes consécutifs à une surcharge vocale, favorisant des patterns phonatoires dysfonctionnels (Martins et al., 2014). Ce travail vise à identifier les facteurs individuels qui prédisent l’augmentation de la charge vocale. Méthode : 87 enseignants ont porté un dosimètre durant une semaine de travail (Figure 1). Ce dispositif permet le monitoring du comportement phonatoire à l’aide d’un capteur de vibration des plis vocaux. Les paramètres de charge vocale analysés toutes les 200 ms sont : la durée de phonation, l’intensité et la fréquence fondamentale de la voix (F0). Les caractéristiques individuelles suivantes des participants ont été étudiées : genre, âge, nombre d’années de carrière dans l’enseignement, niveau enseigné (Tableau 1), consommation de tabac, présence de problèmes gastro-œsophagiens, pratique d’un loisir sollicitant l’usage de la voix, éducation vocale, problèmes vocaux passés, présence de plaintes vocales au moment de l’étude évaluée avec le Voice Handicap Index (VHI) (Woisard et al., 2004). Afin de déterminer l’effet des facteurs individuels sur les paramètres de charge vocale, des modèles linéaires mixtes ont été utilisés. Résultats : Aucun facteurs individuel n’influence la durée de phonation ni l’intensité vocale. Par contre, F0 dépend significativement du genre, du niveau enseigné, de la pratique d’un loisir sollicitant l’usage de la voix, et du score au VHI. Plus précisément, F0 est plus élevée pour les femmes que les hommes (Δ=68 Hz), pour les individus ne pratiquant pas de loisir vocal (Δ=10 Hz), et pour ceux ayant un score élevé au VHI (augmentation de 0,7 Hz pour chaque point supplémentaire au VHI). Le niveau enseigné impacte la F0 des femmes uniquement. Les enseignantes des universités ont une voix plus grave que celles du maternel (Δ=58 Hz), du primaire (Δ=44 Hz), et du secondaire (Δ=31 Hz). Conclusions : Sachant que l’élévation de F0 augmente les stress mécaniques liés à la vibration, les individus à risque de phonotraumatismes sont les femmes et particulièrement celles qui enseignent dans les niveaux inférieurs, ainsi que les enseignants auto-rapportant des plaintes vocales. La voix plus grave des participants ayant une activité extra-professionnelle vocale pourrait s’expliquer par une inflammation aigue ou une fatigue musculaire liée à la surcharge vocale (Remacle et al., 2018). Ces informations aident à identifier les enseignants à cibler dans les programmes de dépistage et de prévention des problèmes vocaux. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 76 (11 ULiège)
See detailLes troubles de la voix chez les enseignants : Quels en sont les facteurs de risque et les conséquences ?
Remacle, Angélique ULiege

Scientific conference (2019, April 11)

Au cours de leur carrière, plus de la moitié des enseignants développent des troubles de la voix. Il s’agit principalement de phonotraumatismes consécutifs à une surcharge vocale, menant à des patterns ... [more ▼]

Au cours de leur carrière, plus de la moitié des enseignants développent des troubles de la voix. Il s’agit principalement de phonotraumatismes consécutifs à une surcharge vocale, menant à des patterns phonatoires dysfonctionnels. Ces perturbations laryngées impliquent une dégradation du son et un inconfort physique pour le locuteur. La première partie de cette conférence porte sur les facteurs individuels qui induisent une augmentation de la charge vocale. Le monitoring du comportement phonatoire à l’aide de capteurs de vibration permet d’étudier la durée de phonation, l’intensité et la fréquence de la voix en contexte écologique. Ces données sont mises en relation avec les facteurs individuels afin d’identifier les enseignants les plus à risque de développer un trouble lié à une charge vocale élevée. La deuxième partie de l’exposé s’intéresse aux conséquences des troubles vocaux des enseignants. Sur base de travaux menés en collaboration avec Isabel Schiller, le point de vue de l’auditeur est adopté. L’impact de la voix dysphonique de l’enseignant sur la compréhension des élèves est exposé. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 104 (8 ULiège)
See detailFacteurs de risque et conséquences des troubles de la voix : l’exemple des enseignants
Remacle, Angélique ULiege

Scientific conference (2019, February 27)

En contexte pédagogique, les challenges pour l’enseignant sont (i) communiquer efficacement en environnement hostile (acoustique défavorable, bruit ambiant élevé) ; (ii) capter l’attention des élèves pour ... [more ▼]

En contexte pédagogique, les challenges pour l’enseignant sont (i) communiquer efficacement en environnement hostile (acoustique défavorable, bruit ambiant élevé) ; (ii) capter l’attention des élèves pour transmettre un contenu pédagogique ; (iii) assurer la gestion de la classe (organisation, discipline). Au cours de leur carrière, plus de la moitié des enseignants développent des troubles de la voix. Il s’agit principalement de phonotraumatismes consécutifs à une surcharge vocale, menant à des patterns phonatoires dysfonctionnels. Ces perturbations laryngées impliquent une dégradation du son et un inconfort physique pour le locuteur. La première partie de cet exposé vise à identifier les facteurs individuels qui prédisent l’augmentation de la charge vocale. Le monitoring du comportement phonatoire à l’aide de capteurs de vibration des plis vocaux permet d’étudier la durée de phonation, l’intensité et la fréquence de la voix en contexte écologique. Ces données sont mises en relation avec les facteurs individuels afin d’identifier les enseignants les plus à risque de développer un trouble lié aux phonotraumatismes. La deuxième partie de l’exposé, basée sur les travaux de thèse d’Isabel Schiller, s’intéresse aux conséquences des troubles vocaux du locuteur sur la compréhension des élèves. L’impact d’une voix dysphonique sur la discrimination phonologique et la compréhension morphosyntaxique d’enfants de 5-6 ans est évalué. Les résultats suggèrent que la dysphonie de l’enseignant impacte la manière dont les enfants traitent l’information linguistique. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 115 (5 ULiège)
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe effect of impaired speaker’s voice and noise on children's spoken language processing
Schiller, Isabel ULiege; Morsomme, Dominique ULiege; Kob, Malte et al

Poster (2019, January 11)

Background – Past studies indicate that listening to either impaired voice or against background noise may compromise children’s ability to process spoken language. However, the interaction of both ... [more ▼]

Background – Past studies indicate that listening to either impaired voice or against background noise may compromise children’s ability to process spoken language. However, the interaction of both factors remains largely unknown. Aim – The aim of this study was to investigate single and combined effects of impaired speaker’s voice and noise on spoken language processing in children (aged 5-6). Methods – First-grade primary school children (n = 53) individually performed two listening tasks: A Minimal-Pair Discrimination task assessing speech perception and a Sentence-Picture Matching Task assessing listening comprehension. Speech stimuli were presented in four conditions: (C1) normal voice and no noise, (C2) imitated impaired voice and no noise, (C3) normal voice and speech-shaped noise, and (C4) imitated impaired voice and speech-shaped noise. Task score per condition was calculated as measure of performance. Results – Irrespective of task, children performed significantly lower when stimuli were presented in a combination of impaired voice and noise (C4) as compared to any other condition. The presence of only one adverse factor (C2 or C3) lowered performance in the speech perception task but not the listening comprehension task. Discussion – Results suggest that when processing speech, young school-aged children are highly vulnerable to the combined effect of impaired speaker’s voice and noise. This could be due to increased auditory masking and reduced cognitive capacity available for linguistic processing. With only a single adverse factor present, children seem able to still use semantic or syntactic context cues for correct interpretation. However, performance drops when such cues are unavailable. Conclusion – Favorable listening conditions may be crucial for children’s processing of spoken language and positive learning outcomes. Particularly in the educational context, where listening is affected by voice quality and noise, measures should be taken to enhance the transmission of the speech signal and reduce noise. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 56 (13 ULiège)