References of "Reginster, Jean-Yves"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPrediction of 5-year mortality risk by malnutrition according to the GLIM format using seven pragmatic approaches to define the criterion of loss of muscle mass
Sanchez Rodriguez, Maria Dolores Carmen ULiege; Locquet, Médéa ULiege; Bruyère, Olivier ULiege et al

in Clinical Nutrition (in press)

Objectives: To assess the association between baseline malnutrition according to the GLIM format, using seven pragmatic approaches to define the criterion of loss of muscle mass, with mortality in the ... [more ▼]

Objectives: To assess the association between baseline malnutrition according to the GLIM format, using seven pragmatic approaches to define the criterion of loss of muscle mass, with mortality in the SarcoPhAge (Sarcopenia and Physical Impairment with advancing Age) study during a 5-year follow-up. Secondarily, to calculate diagnostic performance indicators, concordance, and feasibility of these 7 pragmatic approaches compared to the original GLIM criteria. Methods: Post-hoc analysis of the SarcoPhAge cohort, which included 534 community-dwelling volunteers ≥ 65-year-old, followed-up from 2013 to 2019. Baseline malnutrition was defined by GLIM criteria and 7 approaches: 1) Omission of a reduced muscle mass as a criterion; 2) Substitution for handgrip strength, 3) Calf-circumference, 4) Mid-arm circumference, 5) Goodman's grid, 6) Ishii's score chart, and 7) Yu's formula. The association between malnutrition (according to GLIM criteria and the 7 approaches) and mortality was assessed by Cox-regressions. Sensitivity, Specificity, Positive (PPV), Negative (NPV) predictive values, area under the curve (AUC), Cohenekappa coefficient, and TELOS-feasibility score were calculated. Results: Data to calculate GLIM criteria were available for 373 subjects (73.07 ± 5.96 years, 56% women). Prevalence of malnutrition with GLIM criteria was 24.4% (ranged from 13.9% to 20.9% with the 7 approaches). GLIM criteria showed a HR ¼ 3.38 (1.89-6.09) to predict mortality during the 5-year follow-up which ranged from HR = 2.72 (1.51 - 4.91) to 3.94 (2.14 - 7.24) with the 7 approaches. All 7 approaches were feasible (TELOS ≥ 3), showed sensitivity ≥ 65%, specificity ≥ 95.4%, PPV ≥ 85%, NPV ≥ 88%, AUC ≥ 0.7 and had almost-perfect/strong concordance (k ≥ 0.7) with the original GLIM criteria. Conclusions: GLIM criteria and the 7 approaches predicted three-to four-fold mortality, all ensured an accurate diagnosis, and were feasible in clinical settings. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 66 (13 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAn Updated Systematic Review of Cost‑Effectiveness Analyses of Drugs for Osteoporosis
Li, N.; Cornelissen, D.; Silverman, S. et al

in PharmacoEconomics (in press)

Background: Considering the heavy economic burden of osteoporotic fractures, the limits of healthcare resources, and the recent availability of new anti-osteoporosis drugs, there is continuing interest in ... [more ▼]

Background: Considering the heavy economic burden of osteoporotic fractures, the limits of healthcare resources, and the recent availability of new anti-osteoporosis drugs, there is continuing interest in economic evaluation studies of osteoporosis management strategies. Objectives This study aims to (1) systematically review recent economic evaluations of drugs for osteoporosis and (2) to apply an osteoporosis-specific guideline to critically appraise them. Methods: A literature search was undertaken using PubMed, EMBASE, National Health Service Economic Evaluation database, and the Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Registry to identify original articles containing economic evaluations of anti-osteoporosis drugs, published between 1 July, 2013 and 31 December, 2019. A recent European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases-International Osteoporosis Foundation (ESCEO-IOF) guideline for the conduct and reporting of economic evaluations in osteoporosis was used to assess the quality of included articles. Results: The database search retrieved 3860 records, of which 27 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. These studies were conducted in 15 countries; 12 active drugs were assessed, including various traditional pharmacological treatments such as bisphosphonates, raloxifene, strontium ranelate, denosumab, and teriparatide, and new agents such as abaloparatide, romosozumab, and gastro-resistant risedronate. Eight out of 12 studies that compared traditional oral bisphosphonates to other active interventions (denosumab, zoledronic acid, gastro-resistant risedronate, and teriparatide) suggested that the other active agents were generally cost-effective or dominant. Additionally, the cost-effectiveness of sequential therapy has recently been assessed and indications are that it can lead to extra health benefits (larger gains in quality-adjusted life-year). The key drivers of cost effectiveness included baseline fracture risk, drug effect on the risk of fracture, drug cost, and medication adherence/persistence. The current average score for quality assessment was 17 out of 25 (range 2–15); room for improvement was observed for most studies, which could potentially be explained by the fact that most studies were published prior to the osteoporosis-specific guideline. Greater adherence to guideline recommendations was expected for future studies. The quality of reporting was also suboptimal, especially with regard to treatment side effects, treatment effect after discontinuation, and medication adherence. Conclusions: This updated review provides an overview of recently published cost-effectiveness analyses. In comparison with a previous review, recent economic evaluations of anti-osteoporosis drugs were conducted in more countries and included more active drugs and sequential therapy as interventions/comparators. The updated economic evidence could help decision makers prioritize health interventions and the unmet/unreported quality issues indicated by the osteoporosis-specific guideline could be useful in improving the transparency, quality, and comparability of future economic evaluations in osteoporosis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailOutcome priorities for older persons with sarcopenia
Hiligsmann, M.; Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege; Bruyère, Olivier ULiege et al

in Journal of the American Directors Associations (in press)

Objectives: To evaluate patients’ preferences for sarcopenia outcomes. Design: Discrete-choice experiment (DCE) Setting and Participants: Community-dwelling individuals older than 65 years suffering from ... [more ▼]

Objectives: To evaluate patients’ preferences for sarcopenia outcomes. Design: Discrete-choice experiment (DCE) Setting and Participants: Community-dwelling individuals older than 65 years suffering from sarcopenia recruited in Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and Switzerland, who visited the clinic and were cognitively able to understand and fill out the survey. Methods: In the DCE survey, participants were repetitively asked to choose which one of the 2 patients suffering from sarcopenia deserves treatment the most. The 2 patients presented different levels of risk for 5 preselected sarcopenia outcomes: quality of life, mobility, domestic activities, fatigue, and falls. The DCE included 12 choice sets. Mixed logit panel model was used to estimate patients’ preferences and latent class model was conducted to identify profiles of responses. Results: Atotal of 216 sarcopenic personswere included for the analysis (68%women;mean age 78 years). All 5 preselected sarcopenia outcomes were shown to be significant. Overall, the most important sarcopenia outcome was mobility (30%), followed by the ability to manage domestic activities (22%), the risk of falls (18%), fatigue (17%), and quality of life (14%). The latent class model identified 2 classes of respondents. In the first class (probability of 56%), participants valued mobility the most (42%), followed by the ability to manage domestic activities (23%) and risk of falls (17%). In the second class, fatiguewas the most important outcome (27%) followed by domestic activities (19%) and risk of falls (19%). No statistically significant associations between the latent classes and sociodemographic characteristics were found. Conclusions and Implications: This study suggests that all 5 preselected outcomes were important for sarcopenic older individuals. Overall, the most important outcomes were mobility and the ability to manage domestic activities, although variations in preferenceswere observed between respondents. This could help in incorporating patient preferences when designing appropriate solutions for individuals with sarcopenia. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (14 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailOdanacatib for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis: results of the LOFT multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial and LOFT Extension Study
McClung, M.R.; O'Donoghue, M.L.; Papapoulos, S.E. et al

in Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology (in press)

Background: Odanacatib, a cathepsin K inhibitor, reduces bone resorption while maintaining bone formation. Previous work has shown that odanacatib increases bone mineral density in postmenopausal women ... [more ▼]

Background: Odanacatib, a cathepsin K inhibitor, reduces bone resorption while maintaining bone formation. Previous work has shown that odanacatib increases bone mineral density in postmenopausal women with low bone mass. We aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of odanacatib to reduce fracture risk in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Methods: The Long-term Odanacatib Fracture Trial (LOFT) was a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebocontrolled, event-driven study at 388 outpatient clinics in 40 countries. Eligible participants were women aged at least 65 years who were postmenopausal for 5 years or more, with a femoral neck or total hip bone mineral density T-score between –2·5 and –4·0 if no previous radiographic vertebral fracture, or between –1·5 and –4·0 with a previous vertebral fracture. Women with a previous hip fracture, more than one vertebral fracture, or a T-score of less than –4·0 at the total hip or femoral neck were not eligible unless they were unable or unwilling to use approved osteoporosis treatment. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1) to either oral odanacatib (50 mg once per week) or matching placebo. Randomisation was done using an interactive voice recognition system after stratification for previous radiographic vertebral fracture, and treatment was masked to study participants, investigators and their staff, and sponsor personnel. If the study completed before 5 years of double-blind treatment, consenting participants could enrol in a double-blind extension study (LOFT Extension), continuing their original treatment assignment for up to 5 years from randomisation. Primary endpoints were incidence of vertebral fractures as assessed using radiographs collected at baseline, 6 and 12 months, yearly, and at final study visit in participants for whom evaluable radiograph images were available at baseline and at least one other timepoint, and hip and non-vertebral fractures adjudicated as being a result of osteoporosis as assessed by clinical history and radiograph. Safety was assessed in participants who received at least one dose of study drug. The adjudicated cardiovascular safety endpoints were a composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke, and new-onset atrial fibrillation or flutter. Individual cardiovascular endpoints and death were also assessed. LOFT and LOFT Extension are registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (number NCT00529373) and the European Clinical Trials Database (EudraCT number 2007-002693-66). Findings: Between Sept 14, 2007, and Nov 17, 2009, we randomly assigned 16 071 evaluable patients to treatment: 8043 to odanacatib and 8028 to placebo. After a median follow-up of 36·5 months (IQR 34·43–40·15) 4297 women assigned to odanacatib and 3960 assigned to placebo enrolled in LOFT Extension (total median follow-up 47·6 months, IQR 35·45–60·06). In LOFT, cumulative incidence of primary outcomes for odanacatib versus placebo were: radiographic vertebral fractures 3·7% (251/6770) versus 7·8% (542/6910), hazard ratio (HR) 0·46, 95% CI 0·40–0·53; hip fractures 0·8% (65/8043) versus 1·6% (125/8028), 0·53, 0·39–0·71; non-vertebral fractures 5·1% (412/8043) versus 6·7% (541/8028), 0·77, 0·68–0·87; all p<0·0001. Combined results from LOFT plus LOFT Extension for cumulative incidence of primary outcomes for odanacatib versus placebo were: radiographic vertebral fractures 4·9% (341/6909) versus 9·6% (675/7011), HR 0·48, 95% CI 0·42–0·55; hip fractures 1·1% (86/8043) versus 2·0% (162/8028), 0·52, 0·40–0·67; non-vertebral fractures 6·4% (512/8043) versus 8·4% (675/8028), 0·74, 0·66–0·83; all p<0·0001. In LOFT, the composite cardiovascular endpoint of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke occurred in 273 (3·4%) of 8043 patients in the odanacatib group versus 245 (3·1%) of 8028 in the placebo group (HR 1·12, 95% CI 0·95–1·34; p=0·18). New-onset atrial fibrillation or flutter occurred in 112 (1·4%) of 8043 patients in the odanacatib group versus 96 (1·2%) of 8028 in the placebo group (HR 1·18, 0·90–1·55; p=0·24). Odanacatib was associated with an increased risk of stroke (1·7% [136/8043] vs 1·3% [104/8028], HR 1·32, 1·02–1·70; p=0·034), but not myocardial infarction (0·7% [60/8043] vs 0·9% [74/8028], HR 0·82, 0·58–1·15; p=0·26). The HR for all-cause mortality was 1·13 (5·0% [401/8043] vs 4·4% [356/8028], 0·98–1·30; p=0·10).When data from LOFT Extension were included, the composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke occurred in significantly more patients in the odanacatib group than in the placebo group (401 [5·0%] of 8043 vs 343 [4·3%] of 8028, HR 1·17, 1·02–1·36; p=0·029, as did stroke (2·3% [187/8043] vs 1·7% [137/8028], HR 1·37, 1·10–1·71; p=0·0051). Interpretation: Odanacatib reduced the risk of fracture, but was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events, specifically stroke, in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Based on the overall balance between benefit and risk, the study’s sponsor decided that they would no longer pursue development of odanacatib for treatment of osteoporosis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (3 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDetermining individual trajectories of joint space loss: improved statistical methods for monitoring knee osteoarthritis disease progression
Parsons, C.M.; Judge, A.; Meyer, R et al

in Osteoarthritis and Cartilage (2021), 29(1), 59-67

Objectives: Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) progression is frequently monitored by calculating the change in knee joint space width (JSW) measurements. Such differences are small and sensitive to measurement ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) progression is frequently monitored by calculating the change in knee joint space width (JSW) measurements. Such differences are small and sensitive to measurement error.We aimed to assess the utility of two alternative statistical modelling methods for monitoring KOA. Material and methods: We used JSW on radiographs from both the control arm of the Strontium Ranelate Efficacy in Knee Osteoarthritis trial (SEKOIA), a 3-year multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase three trial, and the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI), an open-access longitudinal dataset from the USA comprising participants followed over 8 years. Individual estimates of annualised change obtained from frequentist linear mixed effect (LME) and Bayesian hierarchical modelling, were compared with annualised crude change, and the association of these parameters with change in WOMAC pain was examined. Results: Mean annualised JSW changes were comparable for all estimates, a reduction of around 0.14 mm/y in SEKOIA and 0.08 mm/y in OAI. The standard deviation (SD) of change estimates was lower with LME and Bayesian modelling than crude change (SEKOIA SD ¼ 0.12, 0.12 and 0.21 respectively; OAI SD ¼ 0.08, 0.08 and 0.11 respectively). Estimates from LME and Bayesian modelling were statistically significant predictors of change in pain in SEKOIA (LME P-value ¼ 0.04, Bayes P-value ¼ 0.04), while crude change did not predict change in pain (P-value ¼ 0.10). Conclusions: Implementation of LME or Bayesian modelling in clinical trials and epidemiological studies, would reduce sample sizes by enabling all study participants to be included in analysis regardless of incomplete follow up, and precision of change estimates would improve. They provide increased power to detect associations with other measures. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCost-effectiveness of FRAX®-based intervention thresholds for management of osteoporosis in Singaporean women
Chandran, M.; Ganesan, G.; Tan, K. B. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2021), 32(1), 133-144

Summary: Cost-effectiveness analysis of FRAX® intervention thresholds (ITs) in Singaporean women > 50 years of age showed that generic alendronate was cost-effective at age-dependent major osteoporotic ... [more ▼]

Summary: Cost-effectiveness analysis of FRAX® intervention thresholds (ITs) in Singaporean women > 50 years of age showed that generic alendronate was cost-effective at age-dependent major osteoporotic fracture (MOF) IT from the ages of 65 years for both full and real-world adherence whilst hip fracture (HF) ITs were cost-effective from the ages of 60 and 65 years. Alendronate was cost-effective irrespective of age only at fixed MOF IT of 14% and HF IT of 3.5%. Introduction: FRAX®-based intervention thresholds (ITs) were recently identified for osteoporosis management in Singapore. This study aimed to assess the cost-effectiveness of ITs in Singaporean women over the age of 50 years. Methods: A validated Markov microsimulation model was used to estimate the lifetime healthcare costs (SGD2019) per quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) of generic alendronate compared with no treatment. Cost-effectiveness of age-dependent FRAX® major osteoporotic fracture (MOF) and hip fracture (HF) ITs was explored. In addition, ITs that would lead to cost-effectiveness were computed. Fracture incidence and cost data were obtained from the Ministry of Health and a previously published Singaporean study. A cost-effectiveness threshold of SGD 62,500/QALY gained was used, based conservatively on 0.7 times the Singapore GDP per capita. Results: Generic alendronate was shown to be cost-effective at MOF ITs from the ages of 65 years, while HF ITs were cost-effective from the ages of 60 and 65 years, assuming full and real-world adherence, respectively. A 14% MOF and a 3.5% HF ITs were required for alendronate to be cost-effective above 50 years. Conclusion: This study suggests that the treatment of Singaporean women with alendronate is cost-effective at age-dependant FRAX® intervention thresholds at 65 years and older. Furthermore, identifying women at any age above 50 years with a 10-year risk of MOF or HF of 14% or 3.5% would lead to efficient use of resources. Cost-effective access to therapy for patients at high fracture probability based on FRAX® could contribute to reduce the growing burden of osteoporotic fractures in Singapore. © 2020, The Author(s). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (3 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detail2019 revised algorithm for the management of knee osteoarthritis: the Southeast Asian viewpoint
Yeap, Swan Sim; Tanavalee, Aree; Perez, Emmanuel C. et al

in Aging Clinical and Experimental Research (2021), 33

Background: Since 2014, the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO) algorithm for the management of knee osteoarthritis (OA ... [more ▼]

Background: Since 2014, the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO) algorithm for the management of knee osteoarthritis (OA) is available worldwide. Aim: Based on this document, a Southeast Asia Working Group (SEAWG) wished to see how the new ESCEO algorithm developed in 2019 was perceived by Southeast Asian experts and how it was integrated into their clinical practice. Methods: A SEAWG was set up between members of the international ESCEO task force and a group of Southeast Asian experts. Results: Non-pharmacological management should always be combined with pharmacological management. In step 1, symptomatic slow-acting drugs for osteoarthritis are the main background therapy, for which high-quality evidence is available only for the formulations of patented crystalline glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate. In step 2, oral NSAIDs are a useful option, considering the cardiovascular/renal/gastrointestinal profiles of the individual patient. Intra-articular hyaluronic acid and corticosteroids are a possible alternative to oral NSAIDs, but limited evidence is available. If steps 1 and 2 do not give adequate relief of symptoms, tramadol can be used, but its safety is debated. In general, the indications of the ESCEO algorithm are important in Southeast Asian countries, but the reimbursement criteria of local health systems are an important aspect for adherence to the ESCEO algorithm. Conclusion This guidance provides evidence-based and easy-to-follow advice on how to establish a treatment algorithm in knee OA, for practical implementation in clinical practice in Southeast Asian countries. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHow has COVID-19 affected the treatment of osteoporosis? An IOF-NOF-ESCEO global survey
Fuggle, N. R.; Singer, A.; Gill, C. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2021), 32

Summary: The effects of COVID-19 have the potential to impact on the management of chronic diseases including osteoporosis. A global survey has demonstrated that these impacts include an increase in ... [more ▼]

Summary: The effects of COVID-19 have the potential to impact on the management of chronic diseases including osteoporosis. A global survey has demonstrated that these impacts include an increase in telemedicine consultations, delays in DXA scanning, interruptions in the supply of medications and reductions in parenteral medication delivery. Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic has had profound effects on the health of the global population both directly, via the sequelae of the infection, and indirectly, including the relative neglect of chronic disease management. Together the International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation sought to ascertain the impact on osteoporosis management. Methods: Questionnaires were electronically circulated to a sample of members of both learned bodies and included information regarding the location and specialty of respondents, current extent of face to face consultations, alterations in osteoporosis risk assessment, telemedicine experience, alterations to medication ascertainment and delivery and electronic health record (EHR) utilisation. Responses were collected, quantitative data analysed, and qualitative data assessed for recurring themes. Results: Responses were received from 209 healthcare workers from 53 countries, including 28% from Europe, 24% from North America, 19% from the Asia Pacific region, 17% from the Middle East and 12% from Latin America. Most respondents were physicians (85%) with physician assistants, physical therapists and nurses/nurse practitioners represented in the sample. The main three specialties represented included rheumatology (40%), endocrinology (22%) and orthopaedics (15%). In terms of the type of patient contact, 33% of respondents conducted telephone consultations and 21% video consultations. Bone mineral density assessment by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) usage was affected with only 29% able to obtain a scan as recommended. The majority of clinicians (60%) had systems in place to identify patients receiving parenteral medication, and 43% of clinicians reported difficulty in arranging appropriate osteoporosis medications during the COVID-19 crisis. Conclusions: To conclude through surveying a global sample of osteoporosis healthcare professionals, we have observed an increase in telemedicine consultations, delays in DXA scanning, interrupted supply of medications and reductions in parenteral medication delivery. © 2021, The Author(s). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (3 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUsing health-economic evidence to support policy-level decision-making in Singapore-sensitivity analysis that provides further confidence in fracture probability-based cost-effective intervention thresholds.
Chandran, M.; Ganesan, G.; Tan, K. B. et al

in Osteoporosis international : a journal established as result of cooperation between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA (2021), 32

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluating quality of life in frailty: applicability and clinimetric properties of the SarQoL(®) questionnaire.
Geerinck, Anton ULiege; Locquet, Médéa ULiege; Bruyère, Olivier ULiege et al

in Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle (2021), 12(2), 319-330

BACKGROUND: The SarQoL® questionnaire was specifically designed to measure quality of life (QoL) in sarcopenia. Frailty and sarcopenia have areas of overlap, notably weak muscle strength and slow gait ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The SarQoL® questionnaire was specifically designed to measure quality of life (QoL) in sarcopenia. Frailty and sarcopenia have areas of overlap, notably weak muscle strength and slow gait speed, which may mean that the SarQoL could provide a measure of QoL in frailty. This study aimed to evaluate the clinimetric properties of the SarQoL questionnaire in physical frailty using the Fried criteria. METHODS: Analyses were carried out on data from the Sarcopenia and Physical impairment with advancing Age study. Frailty was assessed with the Fried criteria and QoL with the SarQoL, the Short-Form 36-Item, and the EuroQoL 5-Dimension (EQ-5D) questionnaires. We evaluated discriminative power (with the Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance test), internal consistency (with Cronbach's alpha), construct validity (through hypotheses testing), test-retest reliability (with the intraclass correlation coefficient), measurement error (calculating standard error of measurement and smallest detectable change), and responsiveness (through hypotheses testing and standardized response mean). RESULTS: In total, 382 participants were included for the validation and 117 for the responsiveness evaluation. They had a median age of 73 (69-79) years, took 5 (3-8) drugs, and had 4 (3-5) co-morbidities. There were more women (n = 223; 58.4%) than men and, in total, 172 (45%) robust, 167 (44%) pre-frail, and 43 (11%) frail participants. Discriminative power was confirmed when significantly lower (P < 0.001) overall SarQoL scores, and thus also worse QoL, were observed between robust [77.1 (64.35-85.90)], pre-frail [62.54 (53.33-69.57)], and frail [49.99 (40.45-56.06)] participants. Six of the SarQoL domains performed likewise, with significantly lower scores according to frailty status with Domain 7 (fears) being the exception. Internal consistency was good (α = 0.866). Convergent (using Short-Form 36-Item and EQ-5D) and divergent construct validity (using EQ-5D) was confirmed. Test-retest reliability was excellent [intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.918 (0.834-0.961)], with a standard error of measurement of 3.88 and a smallest detectable change of 10.76 points. We found moderate responsiveness when five of the nine hypotheses were confirmed, coupled with a large effect size for the overall SarQoL score (corrected standardized response mean of -1.44). CONCLUSIONS: The SarQoL questionnaire has adequate clinimetric properties for use with frail patients in clinical practice and trials and could provide data that are more appropriate and detailed than the generic questionnaires currently used. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (11 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailExperts' preferences for sarcopenia outcomes: a discrete-choice experiment from a working group of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO) in collaboration with the European Union of Geriatric Medicine Society (EUGMS).
Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege; Bauer, Jürgen M.; Landi, Francesco et al

in Aging clinical and experimental research (2021), 33

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: To assess experts' preference for sarcopenia outcomes. METHODS: A discrete-choice experiment was conducted among 37 experts (medical doctors and researchers) from different countries ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: To assess experts' preference for sarcopenia outcomes. METHODS: A discrete-choice experiment was conducted among 37 experts (medical doctors and researchers) from different countries around the world. In the survey, they were repetitively asked to choose which one of two hypothetical patients suffering from sarcopenia deserves the most a treatment. The two hypothetical patients differed in five pre-selected sarcopenia outcomes: quality of life, mobility, domestic activities, fatigue and falls. A mixed logit panel model was used to estimate the relative importance of each attribute. RESULTS: All sarcopenia outcomes were shown to be significant, and thus, important for experts. Overall, the most important sarcopenia outcome was falls (27%) followed by domestic activities and mobility (24%), quality of life (15%) and fatigue (10%). DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Compared to patient's preferences, experts considered falls as a more important outcome of sarcopenia, while the outcomes fatigue and difficulties in domestic activities were considered as less important. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (3 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUpdate on the ESCEO recommendation for the conduct of clinical trials for drugs aiming at the treatment of sarcopenia in older adults.
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege; Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege; Al-Daghri, Nasser et al

in Aging clinical and experimental research (2021), 33

BACKGROUND: In 2016, an expert working group was convened under the auspices of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) and formulated consensus ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: In 2016, an expert working group was convened under the auspices of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) and formulated consensus recommendations for the conduct of clinical trials for drugs to prevent or treat sarcopenia. AIMS: The objective of the current paper is to provide a 2020 update of the previous recommendations in accordance with the evidence that has become available since our original recommendations. METHODS: This paper is based on literature reviews performed by members of the ESCEO working group and followed up with face to face meetings organized for the whole group to make amendments and discuss further recommendations. RESULTS: The randomized placebo-controlled double-blind parallel-arm drug clinical trials should be the design of choice for both phase II and III trials. Treatment and follow-up should run at least 6 months for phase II and 12 months for phase III trials. Overall physical activity, nutrition, co-prescriptions and comorbidity should be recorded. Participants in these trials should be at least 70-years-old and present with a combination of low muscle strength and low physical performance. Severely malnourished individuals, as well as bedridden patients, patients with extremely limited mobility or individuals with physical limitations clearly attributable to the direct effect of a specific disease, should be excluded. Multiple outcomes are proposed for phase II trials, including, as example, physical performance, muscle strength and mass, muscle metabolism and muscle-bone interaction. For phase III trials, we recommend a co-primary endpoint of a measure of functional performance and a Patient Reported Outcome Measure. CONCLUSION: The working group has formulated consensus recommendations on specific aspects of trial design, and in doing so hopes to contribute to an improvement of the methodological robustness and comparability of clinical trials. Standardization of designs and outcomes would advance the field by allowing better comparison across studies, including performing individual patient-data meta-analyses, and different pro-myogenic therapies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIn memory of Harry K. Genant
Cooper, C.; Halbout, P.; Dawson-hughes, B. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2021), 32

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (3 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImpact of malnutrition status on muscle parameter changes over a 5-year follow-up of community-dwelling older adults from the SarcoPhage Cohort
Lengele, Laetitia ULiege; Bruyère, Olivier ULiege; Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege et al

in Nutrients (2021), 13(2), 407

This study aimed to assess the impact of malnutrition on the 5-year evolution of physical performance, muscle mass and muscle strength in participants from the SarcoPhAge cohort, consisting of community ... [more ▼]

This study aimed to assess the impact of malnutrition on the 5-year evolution of physical performance, muscle mass and muscle strength in participants from the SarcoPhAge cohort, consisting of community-dwelling older adults. The malnutrition status was assessed at baseline (T0) according to the “Global Leadership Initiatives on Malnutrition” (GLIM) criteria, and the muscle parameters were evaluated both at T0 and after five years of follow-up (T5). Lean mass, muscle strength and physical performance were assessed using dual X-ray absorptiometry, handgrip dynamometry, the short physical performance battery test and the timed up and go test, respectively. Differences in muscle outcomes according to nutritional status were tested using Student’s t-test. The association between malnutrition and the relative 5-year change in the muscle parameters was tested using multiple linear regressions adjusted for several covariates. A total of 411 participants (mean age of 72.3 6.1 years, 56% women) were included. Of them, 96 individuals (23%) were diagnosed with malnutrition at baseline. Their muscle parameters were significantly lower than those of the well-nourished patients both at baseline and after five years of follow-up (all p-values < 0.05), except for muscle strength in women at T5, which was not significantly lower in the presence of malnutrition. However, the 5-year changes in muscle parameters of malnourished individuals were not significantly different than those of well-nourished individuals (all p-values > 0.05). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (8 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHighly purified chondroitin sulfate: a literature review on clinical efficacy and pharmacoeconomic aspects in osteoarthritis treatment
Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege; Veronese, N.

in Aging Clinical and Experimental Research (2021), 33

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent musculoskeletal disease and a major cause of negative relevant outcomes, associated with an ever-increasing societal burden. Pharmaceutical-grade chondroitin ... [more ▼]

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent musculoskeletal disease and a major cause of negative relevant outcomes, associated with an ever-increasing societal burden. Pharmaceutical-grade chondroitin sulfate (CS) was repeatedly reported to reduce pain and improve function in patients with OA. This article aims to review the evidence for the role of highly purified (hp) CS (Condrosulf®, IBSA) in the treatment of OA. We collected and reported evidence concerning (1) efficacy of hpCS 800 mg/day in the treatment of OA affecting the knee, hand and hip; (2) efficacy and safety of hpCS 1200 mg/day also in the oral gel formulation; (3) the safety profile of hpCS; (4) the difference of hpCS and pharmaceutical-grade formulations versus food supplements; (5) pharmacoeconomic added value of hpCS. The data support that hpCS is an effective and safe treatment of OA, with its effect already evident at 30 days; in addition, its beneficial action is prolonged, being maintained for at least 3 months after the drug is discontinued. Full safety reports’ analyses confirm that CS is safe to use and has almost no side effects, in particular, it showed better gastrointestinal tolerance if compared with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Moreover, the therapeutic strategy has proved to be cost-effective: treatment with CS reduced the use of NSAIDs and their side effects. © 2020, The Author(s). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCost-effectiveness of buffered soluble alendronate 70mg effervescent tablet for the treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis in Italy
Hiligsmann, M.; Maggi, S.; Veronese, N. et al

in Osteoporosis International (2021), 32

Summary: The use of buffered soluble alendronate 70 mg effervescent tablet, a convenient dosing regimen for bisphosphonate therapy, seems a cost-effective strategy compared with relevant alternative ... [more ▼]

Summary: The use of buffered soluble alendronate 70 mg effervescent tablet, a convenient dosing regimen for bisphosphonate therapy, seems a cost-effective strategy compared with relevant alternative treatments for postmenopausal women with osteoporosis aged 60 years and over in Italy. Introduction: To assess the cost-effectiveness of buffered soluble alendronate (ALN) 70 mg effervescent tablet compared with relevant alternative treatments for postmenopausal osteoporotic women in Italy. Methods: A previously validated Markov microsimulation model was adjusted to the Italian healthcare setting to estimate the lifetime costs (expressed in €2019) per quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) of buffered soluble ALN compared with generic ALN, denosumab, zoledronic acid and no treatment. Pooled efficacy data derived from the NICE network meta-analysis were used for bisphosphonate treatments. Two treatment duration scenarios were assessed: 1 year using persistence data derived from an Italian prospective observational study including 144 and 216 postmenopausal osteoporotic women on buffered soluble ALN and oral ALN, respectively, and 3 years. Analyses were conducted for women 60–80 years of age with a bone mineral density Tscore ≤ − 3.0 or with existing vertebral fractures. Results: In all simulated populations, buffered soluble ALN was dominant (more QALYs, lower costs) compared to denosumab. The cost per QALY gained of buffered soluble ALN compared to generic ALN and no treatment always falls below €20,000 per QALY gained. In the 1-year treatment scenario, zoledronic acid was associated withmore QALY than buffered soluble ALN but the cost per QALY gained of zoledronic acid compared with buffered soluble ALN was always higher than €70,000, while buffered soluble ALN was dominant in the 3-year treatment scenario. Conclusion: This study suggests that buffered soluble ALN represents a cost-effective strategy compared with relevant alternative treatments for postmenopausal osteoporosis women in Italy aged 60 years and over. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailOsteoporosis in Frail Older Adults: Recommendations for Research from the ICFSR Task Force 2020.
Rolland, Y.; Cesari, M.; Fielding, R. A. et al

in The Journal of frailty & aging (2021), 10(2), 168-175

Interactions among physiological pathways associated with osteoporosis and sarcopenia are thought to contribute to the onset of frailty. The International Conference on Frailty and Sarcopenia Research ... [more ▼]

Interactions among physiological pathways associated with osteoporosis and sarcopenia are thought to contribute to the onset of frailty. The International Conference on Frailty and Sarcopenia Research Task Force thus met in March 2020 to explore how emerging interventions to manage fracture and osteoporosis in older adults may reduce frailty, disability, morbidity, and mortality in the older population. Both pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions (including nutritional intervention, exercise, and other lifestyle changes) were discussed, including nutritional intervention, exercise, and other lifestyle changes. Pharmacological treatments for osteoporosis include bone-forming and antiresorptive agents, which may optimally be used in sequential or combination regimens. Since similar mechanisms related to resorption underlie physiological changes in muscle and bone, these interventions may provide benefits beyond treating osteoporosis. Clinical trials to test these interventions, however, often exclude frail older persons because of comorbidities (such as mobility disability and cognitive impairment) or polypharmacy. The Task Force recommended that future clinical trials use harmonized protocols, including harmonized inclusion criteria and similar outcome measures; and that they test a range of multidomain therapies. They further advocated more high-quality research to develop interventions specifically for people who are frail and old. The ICOPE program recommended by WHO appears to be highly recommended to frail older adults with osteoporosis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDiscriminative power of the Sarcopenia Quality of Life (SarQoL) questionnaire with the EWGSOP2 criteria
Geerinck, Anton ULiege; Locquet, Médéa ULiege; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege et al

in Journal of Frailty and Aging (2021), 10(2), 193-194

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (7 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNon-surgical management of knee osteoarthritis: comparison of ESCEO and OARSI 2019 guidelines
Arden, Nigel K.; Perry, Thomas A.; Bannuru, Raveendhara R. et al

in Nature Reviews Rheumatology (2021), 17

Detailed reference viewed: 391 (7 ULiège)