References of "Radioti, Aikaterini"
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See detailOrigin and triggers of the 1-hour electron pulsations in the Saturnian system
Palmaerts, Benjamin ULiege; Burkholder, B.; Delamere, P. A. et al

Conference (2019, June 07)

Phenomena displaying a periodicity of around one hour have been frequently observed in Saturn's magnetosphere during the Cassini era. In particular, flux of energetic electrons can exhibit 1-hour quasi ... [more ▼]

Phenomena displaying a periodicity of around one hour have been frequently observed in Saturn's magnetosphere during the Cassini era. In particular, flux of energetic electrons can exhibit 1-hour quasi-periodic pulsations. While these pulsations have been well characterized, their origin and the processes triggering them remained uncertain at the end of the Cassini mission. Using long imaging sequences of the auroral emissions at Saturn, we report the first direct observational evidence that the 1-hour periodicities arise from a global 1-hour oscillation of the Kronian magnetosphere. This natural oscillation acts independently of the local magnetospheric conditions and can have multiple triggering processes. Many 1-hour quasi-periodic electrons were encountered close to the magnetopause, suggesting that magnetopause processes could trigger them, such as magnetic reconnection and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities. We now report simultaneous presence of KH instabilities and 1-hour electron pulsations, supporting this scenario. Pulsed electrons are also encountered much deeper in the magnetosphere and may originate from reconnection in the magnetodisk, on both the day and night sides of the magnetosphere. [less ▲]

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See detailA nearly corotating long lasting auroral spiral at Saturn
Palmaerts, Benjamin ULiege; Yao, Zhonghua ULiege; Sergis, N. et al

Poster (2019, June 04)

The main ultraviolet auroral emission at Saturn consists of multiple structures of various sizes forming a discontinuous ring of emissions around Saturn’s poles. For decades, it is known that the main ... [more ▼]

The main ultraviolet auroral emission at Saturn consists of multiple structures of various sizes forming a discontinuous ring of emissions around Saturn’s poles. For decades, it is known that the main emission is occasionally organized in a global spiral surrounding the pole. In August 2016, the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) on board the Cassini spacecraft proceeded to a 7h-long imaging of Saturn’s northern aurora. During this observing sequence, the main emission displayed a spiral wrapping around the pole by more than 370° in longitude. The spiral was in rotation around the pole at ~90% of rigid corotation, which is an unusually high velocity for extended auroral structures. A spiral was again observed during a shorter UVIS sequence, sixteen hours after the end of the first sequence. Simultaneously to the first UVIS sequence, imaging of the energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions revealed a hot plasma population in the same local time sector as the extremity of the UV spiral. The leading edge of the plasma population follows the spiral structure around the planet. This correspondence suggests that the presence of the hot plasma distorted the magnetospheric current system, resulting in the spiral shape of the main emission. Furthermore, simultaneous in-situ measurements of the ion fluxes exhibit enhancements recurring every ~10.5 hours. The nearly corotating aurora, ENA emissions and ions revealed by this multi-instrument dataset are likely three signatures of a magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling current system and of the associated hot plasma population corotating with the planet. [less ▲]

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See detailA chemical survey of exoplanets with ARIEL
Tinetti, Giovanna; Drossart, Pierre; Eccleston, Paul et al

in Experimental Astronomy (2018)

Thousands of exoplanets have now been discovered with a huge range of masses, sizes and orbits: from rocky Earth-like planets to large gas giants grazing the surface of their host star. However, the ... [more ▼]

Thousands of exoplanets have now been discovered with a huge range of masses, sizes and orbits: from rocky Earth-like planets to large gas giants grazing the surface of their host star. However, the essential nature of these exoplanets remains largely mysterious: there is no known, discernible pattern linking the presence, size, or orbital parameters of a planet to the nature of its parent star. We have little idea whether the chemistry of a planet is linked to its formation environment, or whether the type of host star drives the physics and chemistry of the planet's birth, and evolution. ARIEL was conceived to observe a large number ( 1000) of transiting planets for statistical understanding, including gas giants, Neptunes, super-Earths and Earth-size planets around a range of host star types using transit spectroscopy in the 1.25-7.8 μm spectral range and multiple narrow-band photometry in the optical. ARIEL will focus on warm and hot planets to take advantage of their well-mixed atmospheres which should show minimal condensation and sequestration of high-Z materials compared to their colder Solar System siblings. Said warm and hot atmospheres are expected to be more representative of the planetary bulk composition. Observations of these warm/hot exoplanets, and in particular of their elemental composition (especially C, O, N, S, Si), will allow the understanding of the early stages of planetary and atmospheric formation during the nebular phase and the following few million years. ARIEL will thus provide a representative picture of the chemical nature of the exoplanets and relate this directly to the type and chemical environment of the host star. ARIEL is designed as a dedicated survey mission for combined-light spectroscopy, capable of observing a large and well-defined planet sample within its 4-year mission lifetime. Transit, eclipse and phase-curve spectroscopy methods, whereby the signal from the star and planet are differentiated using knowledge of the planetary ephemerides, allow us to measure atmospheric signals from the planet at levels of 10-100 part per million (ppm) relative to the star and, given the bright nature of targets, also allows more sophisticated techniques, such as eclipse mapping, to give a deeper insight into the nature of the atmosphere. These types of observations require a stable payload and satellite platform with broad, instantaneous wavelength coverage to detect many molecular species, probe the thermal structure, identify clouds and monitor the stellar activity. The wavelength range proposed covers all the expected major atmospheric gases from e.g. H[SUB]2[/SUB]O, CO[SUB]2[/SUB], CH[SUB]4[/SUB] NH[SUB]3[/SUB], HCN, H[SUB]2[/SUB]S through to the more exotic metallic compounds, such as TiO, VO, and condensed species. Simulations of ARIEL performance in conducting exoplanet surveys have been performed - using conservative estimates of mission performance and a full model of all significant noise sources in the measurement - using a list of potential ARIEL targets that incorporates the latest available exoplanet statistics. The conclusion at the end of the Phase A study, is that ARIEL - in line with the stated mission objectives - will be able to observe about 1000 exoplanets depending on the details of the adopted survey strategy, thus confirming the feasibility of the main science objectives. [less ▲]

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See detailThe polar region of Jupiter’s aurora : barcode noise, conjugate flares and more...
Bonfond, Bertrand ULiege; Grodent, Denis ULiege; Gladstone, Randy et al

Conference (2018, July 11)

Juno’s unprecedented polar orbits around Jupiter allow for unique observations of the polar aurorae and related phenomena. Here we make use of Juno-UVS, the UV imaging spectrograph operating in the 60-200 ... [more ▼]

Juno’s unprecedented polar orbits around Jupiter allow for unique observations of the polar aurorae and related phenomena. Here we make use of Juno-UVS, the UV imaging spectrograph operating in the 60-200 nm range, to explore the polar physics in two very different ways. In the first part of this presentation, we will analyze the rapid variations of the background noise caused by >10MeV electrons penetrating the instrument. In UV images, this rapidly varying signal takes the form of a barcode-like pattern. We will discuss the mapping, the altitude and the characteristic timescale of the “barcode events” in order to constrain the mechanisms giving rise to them. In the second part, we will compare simultaneous observations of the aurorae from the two hemispheres. One dataset comes from Juno-UVS while the other comes from the Hubble Space Telescope STIS instrument. We will show that most auroral features in one hemisphere have a clear counterpart in the other one. Among other examples, we will show evidence of conjugate flares in the active region of the two hemispheres. However, other strong brightness enhancements only show up in one hemisphere, without any echo in the other one. [less ▲]

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See detailAuroral storm and polar arcs at Saturn
Palmaerts, Benjamin ULiege; Radioti, Aikaterini ULiege; Grodent, Denis ULiege et al

Conference (2018, July 11)

On 15 September 2017 the Cassini spacecraft plunged into Saturn's atmosphere after 13 years of successful exploration of the Saturnian system. The day before, the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS ... [more ▼]

On 15 September 2017 the Cassini spacecraft plunged into Saturn's atmosphere after 13 years of successful exploration of the Saturnian system. The day before, the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) on board Cassini observed Saturn's northern aurora for about 14h. In this final UVIS sequence, several auroral structures appear, revealing processes occurring simultaneously in Saturn's magnetosphere. A poleward expansion and a brightening of the main emission dawn arc, a phenomenon known as an auroral storm, suggests that an intense flux closure process took place in the magnetotail through magnetic reconnection. This magnetotail reconnection and the associated field dipolarization generated signatures in the auroral, magnetic field, and plasma wave data. The enhanced magnetotail reconnection is likely caused by a compression of the magnetosphere induced by the arrival at Saturn of an interplanetary coronal mass ejection. In addition to the auroral storm, a polar arc observed on the duskside was tracked for the first time from the start of its growth phase until its quasi disappearance, providing evidence of its formation process. This polar arc is a proxy for the location of reconnection sites on the dayside magnetosphere and for the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field. Finally, the atypical observation of one of the most polar auroral arcs ever reported at Saturn supports the scenario of an interplanetary shock arriving at Saturn at the end of the Cassini mission. In that respect, the ultimate UVIS auroral sequence allowed us to capture dynamical aspects of Saturn’s magnetosphere not frequently or even never observed in the past. [less ▲]

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See detailCassini UVIS Observations of Saturn's Auroras and Polar Haze
Pryor, W.R.; West, R.A.; Jouchoux, A. et al

Poster (2018, July)

In 2016 and 2017, the Cassini Saturn Orbiter executed a final series of high inclination, low- periapsis orbits ideal for studying Saturn's polar regions. The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph ... [more ▼]

In 2016 and 2017, the Cassini Saturn Orbiter executed a final series of high inclination, low- periapsis orbits ideal for studying Saturn's polar regions. The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) obtained an extensive set of auroral images of both poles, some at the highest spatial resolution obtained during Cassini's long orbital mission (2004-2017). In some cases, two or three spacecraft slews at right angles to the long slit of the spectrograph were required to cover the entire auroral region to form images of auroral H2 and H emission. The long wavelength part of the northern UVIS polar images contains a signal from reflected sunlight with absorption signatures of acetylene and other Saturn hydrocarbons. Saturn's UV-dark polar hexagon is now seen in the new UVIS long- wavelength data, surrounded by a circular collar that is less dark. There is a definite spatial relationship between the UV-bright auroras and the dark material, with the dark material concentrated under or just inside of the main auroral oval. The outer dark collar roughly corresponds with the previously reported weaker outer auroral oval (Grodent et al., 2011; Lamy et al., 2013). Time variations in the dark material are seen. The spectroscopy of the different regions will be discussed. As has been previously discussed using Voyager data (Lane et al., 1982, West et al., 1983, Pryor and Hord, 1991), Hubble data (Ben Jaffel et al., 1995; Gerard et al., 1995) and Cassini data (Sayanagi et al., 2018), Saturn's auroras appear to be generating, through both neutral and ion chemistry, UV-dark material that is probably composed of complex hydrocarbons. [less ▲]

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See detailJupiter’s mesmerizing auroral show (PJ13); HST ultraviolet observations near and far from Juno perijoves
Grodent, Denis ULiege; Bonfond, Bertrand ULiege; Palmaerts, Benjamin ULiege et al

Conference (2018, July)

After a 6-month period during which the separation angle between the Sun and Jupiter was too small to permit observations with Earth orbit telescopes, operation of the Hubble Space Telescope, supporting ... [more ▼]

After a 6-month period during which the separation angle between the Sun and Jupiter was too small to permit observations with Earth orbit telescopes, operation of the Hubble Space Telescope, supporting the Juno mission, was resumed (almost) in time for PJ11. We briefly review the main results of the previous part of this HST campaign, covering PJ03 to PJ07. We then present the newest results obtained during PJ11, PJ12 and PJ13. Most of the observing time allocated to this HST campaign was used during the first part of the campaign and allowed us to sample Jupiter’s aurora, not only near Juno’s perijoves, but also during the week before and the week after each perijove. During these times away from perijove, HST-STIS was the sole instrument able to provide high spatial and high temporal resolution dynamic images of Jupiter’s FUV aurora, which can be compared with measurements from Juno’s in situ instruments. Instead of presenting a statistical overview of the data, we have a more detailed look at some specific features revealed by the as yet unsurpassed STIS camera. In particular, we identify distinctive auroral phenomena, like explosive brightenings poleward of the main auroral emission. We present one such event, which we link to a strong perturbation of the magnetic field and of the energy distribution of the plasma particles concurrently observed with Juno. We suggest that the characteristics and the timing of this perturbation and of its associated auroral signature are consistent with a reconnection event. [less ▲]

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See detailSaturn’s auroral processes: insights from the Cassini Grand Finale
Badman, S. V.; Bader, A.; Kinrade, J. et al

Conference (2018, July)

Saturn’s auroral emissions display a variety of features reflecting different regions of the magnetosphere. The ‘main’ aurora is usually dominated by a dawn arc mapping to outer, closed field lines. It ... [more ▼]

Saturn’s auroral emissions display a variety of features reflecting different regions of the magnetosphere. The ‘main’ aurora is usually dominated by a dawn arc mapping to outer, closed field lines. It can be complemented by arcs and spots, sometimes pulsating, at high latitudes, likely occurring on field lines open to the solar wind. Diffuse patches or arcs are also detected at lower latitudes corresponding to particles precipitating from the inner regions. The dawn arc itself has a highly variable intensity and structure, modulated by rotating features and storm-like expansions. We review Saturn’s auroral features and the driving mechanisms in light of the measurements made during the high latitude, low altitude Grand Finale orbits. We focus on the intensity and position variability observed on small spatial scales and how the underlying mechanisms can contribute to the global magnetospheric dynamics. [less ▲]

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See detailCo-Rotating Magnetic Reconnection Site in Saturn's Magnetosphere
Yao, Zhonghua ULiege; Coates, A.; Ray, L. et al

Poster (2018, June)

Using measurements from the Cassini spacecraft in Saturn’s magnetosphere, we propose a 3D physical picture of co-rotating reconnection site, which can only be driven by an internally generated source. Our ... [more ▼]

Using measurements from the Cassini spacecraft in Saturn’s magnetosphere, we propose a 3D physical picture of co-rotating reconnection site, which can only be driven by an internally generated source. Our results demonstrate that the co-rotating magnetic reconnection can drive an expansion of the current sheet in Saturn’s magnetosphere, and consequently produce Fermi acceleration of electrons. This reconnection site lasted for longer than one Saturn’s rotation period. The long-lasting and co-rotating natures of magnetic reconnection site at Saturn suggest fundamentally different roles of magnetic reconnection in driving magnetospheric dynamics (e.g., the auroral precipitation) from the Earth. Our co-rotating reconnection picture could also potentially shed light on the fast rotating magnetized plasma environments in the solar system and beyond. [less ▲]

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See detailPeriodic shearing motions in the Jovian magnetosphere causing a localized peak in the main auroral emission close to noon
Chané, Emmanuel; Palmaerts, Benjamin ULiege; Radioti, Aikaterini ULiege

in Planetary and Space Science (2018), 158

Recently, a transient localized brightness enhancement has been observed in Jupiter's main auroral emission close to noon by Palmaerts et al. (2014). We use results from three-dimensional global MHD ... [more ▼]

Recently, a transient localized brightness enhancement has been observed in Jupiter's main auroral emission close to noon by Palmaerts et al. (2014). We use results from three-dimensional global MHD simulations to understand what is causing this localized peak in the main emission. In the simulations, the peak occurs every rotation period and is due to shearing motions in the magnetodisk. These shearing motions are caused by heavy flux-tubes being accelerated to large azimuthal speeds at dawn. The centrifugal force acting on these flux-tubes is then so high that they rapidly move away from the planet. When they reach noon, their azimuthal velocity decreases, thus reducing the centrifugal force, and allowing the flux-tubes to move back closer to Jupiter. The shearing motions associated with this periodic phenomenon locally increase the field aligned currents in the simulations, thus causing a transient brightness enhancement in the main auroral emission, similar to the one observed by Palmaerts et al. (2014). [less ▲]

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See detailAuroral storm and multiple nightside spots and arcs at Saturn
Palmaerts, Benjamin ULiege; Radioti, Aikaterini ULiege

Conference (2018, April)

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See detailJupiter's aurora observed with HST during Juno orbits 3 to 7
Grodent, Denis ULiege; Bonfond, Bertrand ULiege; Yao, Zhonghua ULiege et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2018), 123

A large set of observations of Jupiter’s ultraviolet aurora was collected with the Hubble Space Telescope concurrently with the NASA-Juno mission, during an 8-month period, from 30 November 2016 to 18 ... [more ▼]

A large set of observations of Jupiter’s ultraviolet aurora was collected with the Hubble Space Telescope concurrently with the NASA-Juno mission, during an 8-month period, from 30 November 2016 to 18 July 2017. These Hubble observations cover Juno orbits 3 to 7 during which Juno in situ and remote sensing instruments, as well as other observatories, obtained a wealth of unprecedented information on Jupiter’s magnetosphere and the connection with its auroral ionosphere. Jupiter’s ultraviolet aurora is known to vary rapidly, with timescales ranging from seconds to one Jovian rotation. The main objective of the present study is to provide a simplified description of the global ultraviolet auroral morphology that can be used for comparison with other quantities, such as those obtained with Juno. This represents an entirely new approach from which logical connections between different morphologies may be inferred. For that purpose, we define three auroral subregions in which we evaluate the auroral emitted power as a function of time. In parallel, we define six auroral morphology families that allow us to quantify the variations of the spatial distribution of the auroral emission. These variations are associated with changes in the state of the Jovian magnetosphere, possibly influenced by Io and the Io plasma torus and by the conditions prevailing in the upstream interplanetary medium. This study shows that the auroral morphology evolved differently during the five ~2-week periods bracketing the times of Juno perijove (PJ03 to PJ07), suggesting that during these periods, the Jovian magnetosphere adopted various states. [less ▲]

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See detailRecurrent magnetic dipolarization at Saturn: revealed by Cassini
Yao, Zhonghua ULiege; Radioti, Aikaterini ULiege; Grodent, Denis ULiege et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics (2018), 123(10), 8502-8517

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See detailConcurrent ultraviolet and infrared observations of the north Jovian aurora during Juno's first perijove
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULiege; Mura, A.; Bonfond, Bertrand ULiege et al

in Icarus (2018), 312

The UltraViolet Spectrograph (UVS) and the Jupiter InfraRed Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) observed the north polar aurora before the first perijove of the Juno orbit (PJ1) on 27 August 2016. The UVS bandpass ... [more ▼]

The UltraViolet Spectrograph (UVS) and the Jupiter InfraRed Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) observed the north polar aurora before the first perijove of the Juno orbit (PJ1) on 27 August 2016. The UVS bandpass corresponds to the H2 Lyman and Werner bands that are directly excited by collisions of auroral electrons with molecular hydrogen. The spectral window of the JIRAM L-band imager includes some of the brightest H3+ thermal features between 3.3 and 3.6 µm. A series of spatial scans obtained with JIRAM every 30 s is used to build up five quasi-global images, each covering ∼12 min. of observations. JIRAM's best spatial resolution was on the order of 50 km/pixel during this time frame, while UVS has a resolution of about 750 km. Most of the observed large-scale auroral features are similar in the two spectral regions, but important differences are also observed in their morphology and relative intensity. Only a part of the UV-IR differences stems from the higher spatial resolution of JIRAM, as some of them are still present following smoothing of the JIRAM images at the UVS resolution. For example, the JIRAM images show persistent narrow arc structures in the 100°–180° SIII longitude sector at dusk not resolved in the ultraviolet, but consistent with the structure of in situ electron precipitation measured two hours later. The comparison between the H2 intensity and the H3+ radiance measured along two radial cuts from the center of the main emission illustrates the complex relation between the electron energy input, their characteristic energy and the H3+ emission. Low values of the H3+ intensity relative to the H2 brightness are observed in regions of high FUV color ratio corresponding to harder electron precipitation. The rapid loss of H3+ ions reacting with methane near and below the homopause appears to play a significant role in the control of the relative brightness of the two emissions. Cooling of the auroral thermosphere by H3+ radiation is spatially variable relative to the direct particle heating resulting from the precipitated electron flux. [less ▲]

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See detailReconnection acceleration in Saturn's dayside magnetodisc: a multicase study with Cassini
Guo, R. L.; Yao, Zhonghua ULiege; Sergis, N. et al

in Astrophysical Journal. Letters (2018)

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See detail"Bar Code" Events in the Juno-UVS Data: A Signature ~10 MeV Electron Microbursts at Jupiter
Bonfond, Bertrand ULiege; Gladstone, G. R.; Grodent, Denis ULiege et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2018), 0(ja),

One of the most intriguing discoveries of Juno is the quasi-systematic detection of up-going electrons above the auroral regions. Here we discuss a byproduct of the most energetic component of this ... [more ▼]

One of the most intriguing discoveries of Juno is the quasi-systematic detection of up-going electrons above the auroral regions. Here we discuss a byproduct of the most energetic component of this population: a contamination resembling bar codes in the Juno-UVS images. This pattern is likely caused by bursts of >10 MeV electrons penetrating the instrument. These events are mostly detected when Juno's magnetic footprint is located poleward of the main emission relative to the magnetic pole. The signal is not periodic, but the bursts are typically 0.1-1 second apart. They are essentially detected when Juno-UVS is oriented towards Jupiter, indicating that the signal is due to up-going electrons. The event detections occur between 1 and 7 Jovian radii above the 1 bar level, suggesting that the electron acceleration takes place close to Jupiter and is thus both strong and brief. [less ▲]

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See detailEvolution of the Auroral Signatures of Jupiter's Magnetospheric Injections
Dumont, Maïté ULiege; Grodent, Denis ULiege; Radioti, Aikaterini ULiege et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2018), 123(10),

Auroral emissions equatorward of the main emission at Jupiter are suggested to reflect the dynamics of the plasma in the middle magnetosphere. Here, we examine the motion of the auroral signatures of ... [more ▼]

Auroral emissions equatorward of the main emission at Jupiter are suggested to reflect the dynamics of the plasma in the middle magnetosphere. Here, we examine the motion of the auroral signatures of magnetospheric injections appearing in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images. Our results suggest that the injected plasma moves planetward and lags behind corotation. We then compare the characteristics of the observed signatures with simulations of the auroral precipitation related to injections due to pitch angle scattering. These results indicate that the lifetime of the auroral structures lies between a half and a full rotation of Jupiter. Ultraviolet (UV) spectrally resolved images acquired with HST are then used to highlight the energy-dependent drift of the electrons in auroral injection signatures. Comparison of these observations with simulations of the energy-dependent drift of injected particles suggests that these structures are 3 hours old. Finally, we extend our investigations towards larger and less structured outer emissions possibly associated with younger plasma injections. The motion and evolution of these features are similar to those of the small and compact ones considered in the first part of the study. [less ▲]

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See detailRAPAS Close range aerial sensing of soils for improved remote sennsing products
Lambot; Van Oost; Orban, Anne ULiege et al

Conference (2018)

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See detailRadiation belts of Jupiter
Radioti, Aikaterini ULiege

Scientific conference (2018)

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