References of "Poirrier, Anne-Lise"
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See detailRhinologic Emergencies: a Prospective Audit in a University Teaching Hospital
ROGISTER, Florence ULiege; ATTA, Lucas; Delrez, Sophie ULiege et al

Conference (2018, April)

Aims: Increasing pressure to reduce healthcare cost threatens the provision of acute ENT coverage round the clock. Our goal was to audit our emergency rhinologic activity over a one-month period. Methods ... [more ▼]

Aims: Increasing pressure to reduce healthcare cost threatens the provision of acute ENT coverage round the clock. Our goal was to audit our emergency rhinologic activity over a one-month period. Methods: A prospective audit for all emergency ENT referrals was carried out from May 1st to May 31th 2017. Descriptive statistics were produced for age, sex, origin, time of arrival, diagnosis and outcome. A specific subgroup analysis was performed for rhinologic emergencies. A basic cost analysis was ran. Results: Over the study period, 190 patients were referred to the ENT emergency service. Twenty percent patients presented with nose or sinus complaint (36.8% with otological or neuro-vestibular primary complaint, 43.2% with laryngeal or neck complaint). Nose and throat complaints were more likely to present at night or on weekends. Ear complaints were more likely to present during business hours. Rhinologic complaint was more likely to require technical or surgical management than ear or throat complaint. Patients with nose complaint required minor procedure in 43.2% cases (35.6% of the total minor procedures), and required surgical procedure in 13.5% cases. Among the total ENT emergency surgical procedures, 62.5% were rhinologic ones, involving the nose (50%) or the sinus (12.5%). Ear or throat initial complaint were more likely to require no treatment or ambulatory management. Conclusion: The emergency rhinologic activity is justified in our hospital. An initial rhinological complaint was more likely to require specific ENT management than other complaints. ENT cover is an efficient service provision, especially for rhinologic emergencies. [less ▲]

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See detailBaseline SNOT-22 as Outcome Predictor: a Powerful Tool just at Hand
ROGISTER, Florence ULiege; DE DORLODOT, Clotilde; ANSARI, Edward et al

Conference (2018, April)

Aims: SNOT-22 was initially designed for rhinosinusitis, but was recenty validated in various nose conditions. Nose or sinus complaint is a common cause of consultation in primary care or ENT clinic ... [more ▼]

Aims: SNOT-22 was initially designed for rhinosinusitis, but was recenty validated in various nose conditions. Nose or sinus complaint is a common cause of consultation in primary care or ENT clinic. Therefore we sought to optimize the simple and versatile instrument SNOT-22. Our aim was to determine the outcome of patients and healthy volunteers solely based on the pattern of the baseline SNOT-22 in a multi-centre study. Methods: Sixty-six healthy volunteers and 383 patients presenting to the rhinology clinic of the ENT academic departments of Godinne, Liege and Brussels participated in this study. SNOT-22 from all participants were collected blindly prior to diagnosis. Participants were then categorized in 5 groups according to their outcome: control, medical rhinologic condition, sinus surgery, functional nose surgery. SNOT-22 items relevant to each group were determined by multinomial logistic regression. Results: Control subjects showed the lowest SNOT-22 scores for all items. Medical rhinologic patients had lower scores than surgical patients. Patients requiring sinus surgery and those listed for nose surgery exhibited a specific pattern of SNOT-22 score. Most relevant items were #1 need to blow nose, #5 post-nasal discharge, #6 thick nasal discharge, #10 facial pain and #21 sense of smell. Conclusions: Distinct SNOT-22 patterns were correlated to subjects outcome. SNOT-22 was able to differentiate patients from controls, to score severity, and could further provide an accurate description of pathology. Baseline SNOT-22 could localize pathology in the sinus or in the nose and predict the need for surgical treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailAnatomie, physiologie, pathologie menées par le bout du nez.
POIRRIER, Anne-Lise ULiege

Scientific conference (2018, March 22)

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See detailLa Polygraphie Ventilatoire
POIRRIER, Anne-Lise ULiege

Scientific conference (2018, March 16)

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See detailA Prospective Audit of Acute ENT Activity in a Teaching Hospital.
Goffinet, Maxime ULiege; ATTA, Lucas; Delrez, Sophie ULiege et al

in B-ENT (2018, March 03)

Introduction and aim: Acute ENT coverage is available out-of-hours in most hospitals. However, increasing pressure to reduce healthcare cost threatens this service provision round the clock. Our goal was ... [more ▼]

Introduction and aim: Acute ENT coverage is available out-of-hours in most hospitals. However, increasing pressure to reduce healthcare cost threatens this service provision round the clock. Our goal was to audit the emergency ENT activity in our institution over a one-month period Material and methods: a prospective audit for all ENT referrals from the emergency department was carried out from May 1st to May 31th 2017. Descriptive statistics were produced for age, sex, origin, time of arrival, diagnosis and patient outcome. Results: a total of 190 patients (109 men and 81 women) were referred to the ENT emergency service over the study period (mean 6.1 case per day). Mean age was 47.9 (±23.6)year (range 1-95). Most patients were ambulatory (75.8%) and came from the area. Most admissions occurred during normal working hours (76.4%) and 62.0% patients came by self reference. The mean complaint duration before admission was 7.6 (±13.7) days (range 0-92 days). One third (33.2% patients) required ambulatory treatment. A quarter (24.7% patients) underwent a minor ENT procedure. Eighteen (9.5%) patients required admission to the ward (mostly for intravenous antibiotic). Eight patients (4.2%) required surgical treatment. There was no difference in the severity of diagnosis or management between patients referred by a physician (GP of specialist) and patients presenting spontaneously. At 30 days, 3 (1.6%) patients died (one of ENT cancer, two of unrelated cause), 106 (55.8%) benefited from an ENT follow’up, 65 (34.2%) were referred to another physician (GP or specialist), 16 (8.4%) were lost to follow’up. Conclusions: The workload suggests that emergency ENT activity is justified in our hospital. Restricting emergency ENT cover to patients referred by a GP or another physician would not allow for a better patient selection. [less ▲]

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See detailPost-irradiated Carotid Blowout Syndrome in patients with Nasopharyngeal Tumor: about 3 cases
DETROUX, Valentine ULiege; GOFFART, Yves; COLLIGNON, Laurent et al

in B-ENT (2018, March)

Introduction Rupture of the internal carotid artery (Carotid blowout syndrome) is a rare complication of irradiated nasopharyngeal tumor. We report three cases nasopharyngeal tumors treated with ... [more ▼]

Introduction Rupture of the internal carotid artery (Carotid blowout syndrome) is a rare complication of irradiated nasopharyngeal tumor. We report three cases nasopharyngeal tumors treated with radiotherapy complicated with bleeding of the internal carotid artery presenting as a massive epistaxis. Case Series The first case presented a few episodes of small nose bleeding before a massive one. Internal carotid embolisation was performed to stop the bleeding. Unfortunately, few month later, he presented a meningitis related to skull base osteoradionecrosis and died from sceptic shock. The second case was transferred to our hospital with severe repetitive epistaxis that had been occurring for hours. No endovascular treatment was possible in his case and he died in intensive care unitthe dayof his admission. The thrid case presented one massive epistaxis which stopped without any treatment or compression. A spontaneous occlusion of his internal carotid artery occured without any neurological defects. He recently benefited from a nasopharyngeal muscle flap for the coverage of the carotid artery. These three patients all presented with a history of nasopharyngeal tumor handled by radiotherapy. Pathogenesis, treatment, and outcome are discussed on the light of a comprehensive literature review. Conclusions Carotid blowout syndrome secondary to radiation therapy is rare but life-threatening. Re-irradiation and skull base osteoradionecrosis are strong predisposing factors. [less ▲]

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See detailIndications, techniques chirurgicales et complications en Rhinologie
POIRRIER, Anne-Lise ULiege

Scientific conference (2018, January 25)

Trick and tips for turbinoplasty, septoplasty and endoscopic sinus surgery: a practical guide. Where to start, how to start, how to ensure good outcome and where to stop.

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Peer Reviewed
See detailHow the ENT surgeon joins the crew: Myths and realities in multidisciplinary team-working
POIRRIER, Anne-Lise ULiege; Poirrier, Robert ULiege

Conference (2017, November 25)

Core Message. Bring the ENT surgeon on board. ENT evaluation is paramount for multi-disciplinary management. Options extend far beyond CPAP. In case of surgery, options extend far beyond UPPP.

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See detailSnoring: Surgical Options beyond UPPP & Tonsillectomy
POIRRIER, Anne-Lise ULiege

Conference (2017, November 17)

Core Message. Bring the ENT surgeon on board. ENT evaluation is even more indicated for OSA patients than for simple snorers. Snoring treatment never saved a marriage. Options extend far beyond surgery ... [more ▼]

Core Message. Bring the ENT surgeon on board. ENT evaluation is even more indicated for OSA patients than for simple snorers. Snoring treatment never saved a marriage. Options extend far beyond surgery. In case of surgery, options expand far beyond UPPP. [less ▲]

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See detailTreatment Options (focus on Surgery)
POIRRIER, Anne-Lise ULiege; ROGISTER, Florence ULiege

Conference (2017, November)

To avoid empty nose syndrome after turbinoplasty, surgical indication is key. Nose obstruction have many others causes than turbinate hypertrophy. Ensuring a good vision during surgery avoids excessive ... [more ▼]

To avoid empty nose syndrome after turbinoplasty, surgical indication is key. Nose obstruction have many others causes than turbinate hypertrophy. Ensuring a good vision during surgery avoids excessive resection. Minimal resection avoids complications. [less ▲]

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See detailNose and Sleep-disordered Breathing
POIRRIER, Anne-Lise ULiege

Conference (2017, September 22)

The nose is the input channel for the airflow. Its rigid and erectile structures determine the outline and the output of the airflow in the upper airway. Nose obstruction, due to reversible or non ... [more ▼]

The nose is the input channel for the airflow. Its rigid and erectile structures determine the outline and the output of the airflow in the upper airway. Nose obstruction, due to reversible or non reversible factors, produces collapsing forces that are manifest downstream in the collapsible pharynx. Moreover, nose pathologies result in unstable oral breathing, decreased activation of nasal-ventilatory reflex and reduced lung nitric oxide. Long-term oral breathing impacts on the craniofacial growth. The management of nose pathologies coud be medical, mechanical (nose dilators) or surgical. Nasal management should be integrated in a multimodal approach, considering the involvement of a multi-level obstruction, and truly reflecting the complexity of sleep disordered breathing. [less ▲]

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See detailEUFOREA Rhinology Research Forum 2016: report of the brainstorming sessions on needs and priorities in rhinitis and rhinosinusitis.
Hellings, P. W.; Akdis, C. A.; Bachert, C. et al

in Rhinology (2017)

The first European Rhinology Research Forum organized by the European Forum for Research and Education in Allergy and Airway Diseases (EUFOREA) was held in the Royal Academy of Medicine in Brussels on ... [more ▼]

The first European Rhinology Research Forum organized by the European Forum for Research and Education in Allergy and Airway Diseases (EUFOREA) was held in the Royal Academy of Medicine in Brussels on 17th and 18th November 2016, in collaboration with the European Rhinologic Society (ERS) and the Global Allergy and Asthma European Network (GA2LEN). One hundred and thirty participants (medical doctors from different specialties, researchers, as well as patients and industry representatives) from 27 countries took part in the multiple perspective discussions including brainstorming sessions on care pathways and research needs in rhinitis and rhinosinusitis. The debates started with an overview of the current state of the art, including weaknesses and strengths of the current practices, followed by the identification of essential research needs, thoroughly integrated in the context of Precision Medicine (PM), with personalized care, prediction of success of treatment, participation of the patient and prevention of disease as key principles for improving current clinical practices. This report provides a concise summary of the outcomes of the brainstorming sessions of the European Rhinology Research Forum 2016. [less ▲]

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See detailLa rhinosinusite chronique.
POIRRIER, Anne-Lise ULiege

Scientific conference (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (1 ULiège)
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See detailPostoperative care in endoscopic sinus surgery: a critical review.
Eloy, Philippe; Andrews, Peter; POIRRIER, Anne-Lise ULiege

in Current Opinion in Otolaryngology & Head & Neck Surgery (2017), 25(1), 35-42

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Chronic rhinosinusitis with and without nasal polyps is a common disease affecting people all over the world. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) has become the gold standard ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Chronic rhinosinusitis with and without nasal polyps is a common disease affecting people all over the world. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) has become the gold standard treatment for medically refractive disease. Postoperative care is recommended by international leaders as an important part of the patient's management. This article is a critical review and discussion focusing on postoperative care, which is based on expert opinion, clinical studies, randomized controlled trials and meta-analysis studies. RECENT FINDINGS: Postoperative care including nasal rinsing, topical corticosteroids, antibiotics and avoidance of nasal packing are unanimously considered to be the cornerstone of best practice following FESS. However, the effectiveness of in-office nasal debridement is still under debate. SUMMARY: There is a lack of consensus regarding the necessity of performing in-office nasal debridement and the majority of clinicians carry out their postoperative care according to experience and their own preference. This is often determined by the extent of surgery performed, the severity of the postoperative inflammation, as well as being dependent on the patient's discomfort, the time constraints associated with postoperative care and the costs associated with additional appointments. Ideally, nasal debridement should be performed by the operating surgeon under endoscopic control both gently and atraumatically. [less ▲]

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See detailOdorat
POIRRIER, Anne-Lise ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2016)

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See detailFunctional respiratory imagning-aided virtual preoperative planning in nasal surgery: towards a personalized approach.
Ansari, Edward; Vos, Wim; Van Holsbeke, Cedric et al

in B-ENT (2016)

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