References of "Picard, Nicolas"
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See detailDynamique des populations d’azobé, Lophira alata Banks ex C. F. Gaertn., et implications pour sa gestion durable au Cameroun
Biwolé, Achille ULiege; Ouédraogo, Dakis-Yaoba; Betti, Jean Lagarde et al

in Bois et Forêts des Tropiques (2019), 342(novembre 2019), 55-68

L’impact de l’exploitation forestière sur le renouvellement du stock de bois d’oeuvre reste largement méconnu en Afrique centrale du fait du manque de données sur la dynamique des populations d’arbres ... [more ▼]

L’impact de l’exploitation forestière sur le renouvellement du stock de bois d’oeuvre reste largement méconnu en Afrique centrale du fait du manque de données sur la dynamique des populations d’arbres exploités. C’est en particulier le cas pour l’azobé, Lophira alata, un bois d’oeuvre de grande valeur commerciale. L’objectif de cette étude est double : quantifier l’effet du type forestier et de l’exploitation sur la croissance de l’azobé et simuler l’évolution du stock exploitable et du taux de reconstitution après exploitation. Nous avons effectué pendant trois ans un suivi annuel de la croissance et de la mortalité dans trois types forestiers au Cameroun : en forêt sempervirente, en forêt mixte et en forêt semi-caducifoliée. Le recrutement a été étudié uniquement en forêt mixte, sous deux conditions : en milieu exploité et non exploité. Nous avons calibré, avec ces données, un modèle matriciel de Usher. Douze scénarios d’exploitation ont été simulés en faisant varier le diamètre minimum d’exploitation de 60, 70 et 80 cm, et l’intensité de prélèvement des arbres de 100 à 40 %. La croissance de l’azobé est influencée à la fois par le type forestier et l’exploitation. Les arbres de forêt sempervirente ont une croissance plus faible jusqu’à 50 cm de diamètre, alors que la croissance maximale prédite pour ce type forestier est la plus élevée. L’exploitation a par ailleurs stimulé la croissance. Enfin, l’exploitation de l’azobé ne respecte pas le principe du rendement soutenu : ses taux de croissance à long terme varient entre 0,54 et 0,83 %. Pour garantir la durabilité de son exploitation au Cameroun, une sylviculture dynamisant la croissance des futurs arbres exploitables, ainsi que leur régénération, s’avère indispensable. [less ▲]

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See detailA regional allometry for the Congo basin forests based on the largest ever destructive sampling
Fayolle, Adeline ULiege; Ngomanda, Alfred; Mbasi, Michel et al

in Forest Ecology and Management (2018), 430

The estimation and monitoring of the huge amount of carbon contained in tropical forests, and specifically in the above-ground biomass (AGB) of trees, is needed for the successful implementation of ... [more ▼]

The estimation and monitoring of the huge amount of carbon contained in tropical forests, and specifically in the above-ground biomass (AGB) of trees, is needed for the successful implementation of climate change mitigation strategies. Its accuracy depends on the availability of reliable allometric equations to convert forest inventory data into AGB estimates. In this study, we tested whether central African forests are really different from other tropical forests with respect to biomass allometry, and further examined the regional variation in tropical tree allometry across the Congo basin forests. Following the same standardized protocol, trees were destructively sampled for AGB in six sites representative of terra firme forests. We fitted regional and local allometric models, including tree diameter, wood specific gravity, tree height, and crown radius in the AGB predictors. We also evaluated the AGB predictions at the tree level across the six sites of our new models and of existing allometric models, including the pantropical equations developed by Chave et al. (2014, 2005) and the local equations developed by Ngomanda et al. (2014) in Gabon. With a total of 845 tropical trees belonging to 55 African species and covering a large range of diameters (up to 200 cm), the original data presented here can be considered as the largest ever destructive sampling for a tropical region. Regional allometric models were established and including tree height and crown radius had a small but significant effect on AGB predictions. In contrast to our expectations, tree height and crown radius did not explain much between-site variation. Examining the performance of general models (pantropical or regional) versus local models (site-specific), we found little advantage of using local equations. Earlier pantropical equations developed for moist forests were found to provide reasonable predictions of tree AGB in most sites, though the wettest sites, i.e., evergreen forests in Equatorial Guinea and, to a lesser extent in Gabon, tended to show a wet forest allometry. For the Congo basin forests, except in Equatorial Guinea where local models might be preferred, we recommend using our regional models, and otherwise the most recent pantropical models, that were validated here. These results constitute a critical step for the estimation and monitoring of biomass/carbon stocks contained in the second largest contiguous block of tropical forests worldwide, and the successful implementation of climate change mitigation strategies, such as REDD+. [less ▲]

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See detailImprove the characterization of tropical forests to improve management: policy brief
Gourlet-Fleury, Sylvie; Aleman, Julie; Bayol, Nicolas et al

Report (2014)

CoForChange has shown that management plans based on timber stock recovery are not enough to ensure the sustainability of these production forests. The variability of forest characteristics and their ... [more ▼]

CoForChange has shown that management plans based on timber stock recovery are not enough to ensure the sustainability of these production forests. The variability of forest characteristics and their different responses to disturbance should be considered in management decisions. [less ▲]

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See detailA new insight in the structure, composition and functioning of central African moist forests
Fayolle, Adeline ULiege; Picard, Nicolas; Doucet, Jean-Louis ULiege et al

in Forest Ecology and Management (2014), (329), 195-205

The greater part of the semi-deciduous moist forests of the Congo basin has been given to logging companies for exploitation. In the next decades, very few of these forests will remain intact. In this ... [more ▼]

The greater part of the semi-deciduous moist forests of the Congo basin has been given to logging companies for exploitation. In the next decades, very few of these forests will remain intact. In this paper, we aimed to identify large-scale variations in the structure, composition and functioning of African moist forests that could serve as a baseline for both management and conservation purposes. Commercial forest inventory data were assembled for 49,711 0.5-ha plots, covering an area of more than six million hectares, crossing the borders of Cameroon, Central African Republic and Republic of Congo. Floristic composition was analyzed for a subset of 176 genera reliably identified in the field. Three key functional traits of tropical trees: regeneration guild, leaf phenology, and wood specific gravity, were collected at the species level from various sources, and assigned at the genus level. We first investigated the main variations in forest structure and composition, and identified seven forest types based on these variations. Differences in the percentage of pioneer and deciduous stems, and mean wood specific gravity were tested between forest types. Most of the study area was composed of a mosaic of the structural variations of the forests characterized by the occurrence of Celtis (Ulmaceae) species, which are mostly composed of frequent and abundant genera that formed the common floristic pool of the region. Secondary Musanga (Moraceae) forest is located in repeatedly disturbed areas, along roads and around main cities; mixed Manilkara (Sapotaceae) forest covers a huge area in the southern Central African Republic and in the northern Republic of Congo; and monodominant Gilbertiodendron (Fabaceae) forest is sparsely distributed along rivers. The contrasted structure, composition, and functioning of the forest types imply pronounced differences in population and ecosystem processes, and call for adapted management and conservation strategies. [less ▲]

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See detailTropical forest recovery from logging: a 24 year silvicultural experiment from Central Africa
Gourlet-Fleury, Sylvie; Mortier, Frédéric; Fayolle, Adeline ULiege et al

in Philosophical Transactions. Biological Sciences (2013), (368),

Large areas of African moist forests are being logged in the context of supposedly sustainable management plans. It remains however controversial whether harvesting a few trees per hectare can be ... [more ▼]

Large areas of African moist forests are being logged in the context of supposedly sustainable management plans. It remains however controversial whether harvesting a few trees per hectare can be maintained in the long term while preserving other forest services as well. We used a unique 24 year silvicultural experiment, encompassing 10 4 ha plots established in the Central African Republic, to assess the effect of disturbance linked to logging (two to nine trees ha−1 greater than or equal to 80 cm DBH) and thinning (11–41 trees ha−1 greater than or equal to 50 cm DBH) on the structure and dynamics of the forest. Before silvicultural treatments, above-ground biomass (AGB) and timber stock (i.e. the volume of commercial trees greater than or equal to 80 cm DBH) in the plots amounted 374.5 ± 58.2 Mg ha−1 and 79.7 ± 45.9 m3 ha−1, respectively. We found that (i) natural control forest was increasing in AGB (2.58 ± 1.73 Mg dry mass ha−1 yr−1) and decreasing in timber stock (−0.33 ± 1.57 m3 ha−1 yr−1); (ii) the AGB recovered very quickly after logging and thinning, at a rate proportional to the disturbance intensity (mean recovery after 24 years: 144%). Compared with controls, the gain almost doubled in the logged plots (4.82 ± 1.22 Mg ha−1 yr−1) and tripled in the logged + thinned plots (8.03 ± 1.41 Mg ha−1 yr−1); (iii) the timber stock recovered slowly (mean recovery after 24 years: 41%), at a rate of 0.75 ± 0.51 m3 ha−1 yr−1 in the logged plots, and 0.81 ± 0.74 m3 ha−1 yr−1 in the logged + thinned plots. Although thinning significantly increased the gain in biomass, it had no effect on the gain in timber stock. However, thinning did foster the growth and survival of small- and medium-sized timber trees and should have a positive effect over the next felling cycle. [less ▲]

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See detailLes équations allométriques pantropicales sont-elles valides en Afrique centrale
Fayolle, Adeline ULiege; Ernst, Gaëtan; Bouissou, Christina et al

Scientific conference (2012, October 24)

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See detailEnvironmental filtering of dense-wooded species controls above-ground biomass stored in African moist forests
Gourlet-Fleury, Sylvie; Rossi, Vivien; Réjou-Méchain, Maxime et al

in Journal of Ecology (2011), 99(4), 981-990

1. Regional above-ground biomass estimates for tropical moist forests remain highly inaccurate mostly because they are based on extrapolations from a few plots scattered across a limited range of soils ... [more ▼]

1. Regional above-ground biomass estimates for tropical moist forests remain highly inaccurate mostly because they are based on extrapolations from a few plots scattered across a limited range of soils and other environmental conditions. When such conditions impact biomass, the estimation is biased. The effect of soil types on biomass has especially yielded controversial results. 2. We investigated the relationship between above-ground biomass and soil type in undisturbed moist forests in the Central African Republic. We tested the effects of soil texture, as a surrogate for soil resources availability and physical constraints (soil depth and hydromorphy) on biomass. Forest inventory data were collected for trees ≥20 cm stem diameter in 2754 0.5 ha plots scattered over 4888 km². The plots contained 224 taxons, of which 209 were identified to species. Soil types were characterized from a 1:1 000 000 scale soil map. Species-specific values for wood density were extracted from the CIRAD’s data base of wood technological properties. 3. We found that basal area and biomass differ in their responses to soil type, ranging from 17.8 m² ha-1 (217.5 t ha-1) to 22.3 m² ha-1 (273.3 t ha-1). While shallow and hydromorphic soils support forests with both low stem basal area and low biomass, forests on deep resource-poor soils are typically low in basal area but as high in biomass as forests on deep resource-rich soils. We demonstrated that the environmental filtering of slow growing dense-wooded species on resource-poor soils compensates for the low basal area, and we discuss whether this filtering effect is due to low fertility or to low water reserve. 4. Synthesis. We showed that soil physical conditions constrained the amount of biomass stored in tropical moist forests. Contrary to previous reports, our results suggest that biomass is similar on resource-poor and resource-rich soils. This finding highlights both the importance of taking into account soil characteristics and species wood density when trying to predict regional patterns of biomass. Our findings have implications for the evaluation of biomass stocks in tropical forests, in the context of the international negotiations on climate change. [less ▲]

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