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See detailMyoferlin, a promising therapeutic target in PDAC, is located in mitochondria-associated membranes
Anania, Sandy ULiege; Boumahd, Yasmine ULiege; Peiffer, Raphaël ULiege et al

Poster (2021, June)

Pancreatic cancer has one of the lowest survival rates with more than 90% of patients dying of the disease. It is predicted that pancreatic cancer will surpass breast cancer death by 2025. Therefore ... [more ▼]

Pancreatic cancer has one of the lowest survival rates with more than 90% of patients dying of the disease. It is predicted that pancreatic cancer will surpass breast cancer death by 2025. Therefore, finding new therapeutic strategies is of major importance. Recently, myoferlin, a protein overexpressed in pancreatic cancer, has been shown to impact mitochondrial dynamics and respiration. Because myoferlin has been showed to be a potential therapeutic target in PDAC, understanding its function and determining its localization in PDAC is of major importance. We focused our interest on mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs). [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment of a prototype device for near real-time surface-enhanced Raman scattering monitoring of biological samples
Dumont, Elodie ULiege; De Bleye, Charlotte ULiege; Rademaker, Gilles ULiege et al

in Talanta (2021), 224

With the fast growth of bioanalytical surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), analytical methods have had to adapt to the complex nature of biological samples. In particular, interfering species and ... [more ▼]

With the fast growth of bioanalytical surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), analytical methods have had to adapt to the complex nature of biological samples. In particular, interfering species and protein adsorption onto the SERS substrates have been addressed by sample preparation steps, such as precipitation or extraction, and by smart SERS substrate functionalisation. These additional handling steps however result in irreversible sample alteration, which in turn prevents sample monitoring over time. A new methodology, that enables near real-time, non-invasive and non-destructive SERS monitoring of biological samples, is therefore proposed. It combines solid SERS substrates, benefitting from liquid immersion resistance for extended periods of time, with an original protein filtering device and an on-field detection by means of a handheld Raman analyser. The protein removal device aims at avoiding protein surface fouling on the SERS substrate. It consists of an ultracentrifugation membrane fixed under a cell culture insert for multi-well plates. The inside of the insert is dedicated to containing biological samples. The solid SERS substrate and a simple medium, without any protein, are placed under the insert. By carefully selecting the membrane molecular weight cutoff, selective diffusion of small analytes through the device could be achieved whereas larger proteins were retained inside the insert. Non-invasive SERS spectral acquisition was then carried out through the bottom of the multi-well plate. The diffusion of a SERS probe, 2-mercaptopyridine, and of a neurotransmitter having a less intense SERS signal, serotonin, were first successfully monitored with the device. Then, the latter was applied to distinguish between subclones of cancerous cells through differences in metabolite production. This promising methodology showed a high level of versatility, together with the capability to reduce cellular stress and contamination hazards. [less ▲]

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See detailTreatment algorithm and prognostic factors for patients with stage I–III carcinoma of the anal canal: a 20-year multicenter study
Bruyère, Diane ULiege; Monnien, Franck; Colpart, Prudence et al

in Modern Pathology (2021), 34

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See detailMyoferlin is a yet unknown interactor of the mitochondrial dynamics’ machinery in pancreas cancer cells
Anania, Sandy ULiege; Peiffer, Raphaël ULiege; Rademaker, Gilles ULiege et al

in Cancers (2020), 12(6), 1643

Pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the deadliest cancers where surgery remains the main survival factor. Mitochondria were described to be involved in tumor aggressiveness in several cancer types ... [more ▼]

Pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the deadliest cancers where surgery remains the main survival factor. Mitochondria were described to be involved in tumor aggressiveness in several cancer types including pancreas cancer. We have previously reported that myoferlin controls mitochondrial structure and function, and demonstrated that myoferlin depletion disturbs the mitochondrial dynamics culminating to a mitochondrial fission. In order to unravel the mechanism underlying this observation, we explored the myoferlin localization in pancreatic cancer cells and showed a colocalization with the mitochondrial dynamic machinery element: mitofusin. This colocalization was confirmed in several pancreas cancer cell lines and in normal cell lines as well. Moreover, in pancreas cancer cell lines, it appeared that myoferlin interacted with mitofusin. These discoveries open-up new research avenue aiming at modulating mitofusin function in pancreas cancer. [less ▲]

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See detailDicarbonyl stress induces an epigenetic deregulation leading to a pro-migratory phenotype in breast cancer.
Tiamiou, Assia ULiege; Dube, Gaurav; Bizet, Martin et al

Poster (2020, February 07)

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See detailMethylglyoxal stress contributes to immunosuppression in breast cancer
Wissocq, Tom ULiege; Hubert, Pascale ULiege; Caprasse, Maurine ULiege et al

Poster (2020, February 07)

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See detailMethylglyoxal Scavengers Resensitize KRAS-Mutated Colorectal Tumors to Cetuximab
Bellier, Justine ULiege; Nokin, Marie-Julie ULiege; Caprasse, Maurine ULiege et al

in Cell Reports (2020), 30(5), 1400-14166

The use of cetuximab anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) antibodies has opened the era of targeted and personalized therapy in colorectal cancer (CRC). Poor response rates have been ... [more ▼]

The use of cetuximab anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) antibodies has opened the era of targeted and personalized therapy in colorectal cancer (CRC). Poor response rates have been unequivocally shown in mutant KRAS and are even observed in a majority of wild-type KRAS tumors. Therefore, patient selection based on mutational profiling remains problematic. We previously identified methylglyoxal (MGO), a by-product of glycolysis, as a metabolite promoting tumor growth and metastasis. Mutant KRAS cells under MGO stress show AKT-dependent survival when compared with wild-type KRAS isogenic CRC cells. MGO induces AKT activation through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/mammalian target of rapamycin 2 (mTORC2) and Hsp27 regulation. Importantly, the sole induction of MGO stress in sensitive wild-type KRAS cells renders them resistant to cetuximab. MGO scavengers inhibit AKT and resensitize KRAS-mutated CRC cells to cetuximab in vivo. This study establishes a link between MGO and AKT activation and pinpoints this oncometabolite as a potential target to tackle EGFR-targeted therapy resistance in CRC. [less ▲]

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See detailRole of myoferlin in mitochondrial dynamics and metabolic fitness of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma
Anania, Sandy ULiege; Rademaker, Gilles ULiege; Bellahcene, Akeila ULiege et al

Poster (2019, December)

Pancreatic cancer is the 7th most common cause of cancer mortality in the world. It is predicted to become the 2nd leading cause of cancer-related death in 2030. In the majority of cases, due to a late ... [more ▼]

Pancreatic cancer is the 7th most common cause of cancer mortality in the world. It is predicted to become the 2nd leading cause of cancer-related death in 2030. In the majority of cases, due to a late diagnosis, the tumor is not resectable and already disseminated. Therefore, new specific biomarkers providing early diagnosis for pancreatic cancer are needed. In addition to the lack of specific and early biomarkers, chemotherapies (gemcitabine and folfirinox) poorly improve the overall survival of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. Hence, a better understanding of physiopathological processes underlying PDAC is required in order to offer more effective treatments. Myoferlin is a 230 kDa protein with multiple C2 domains known to interact, through calcium binding, with negatively charged phospholipids. This protein was first described in myoblast fusion. Interestingly, Myoferlin is also overexpressed in several cancers, including pancreatic cancer, where it plays a role in endocytosis, exocytosis, and has been located in exosomes. Recently, our team showed a fragmentation of the mitochondrial network in PDAC cells when myoferlin was depleted using siRNA. Understanding the mechanism underlying this mitochondrial disruption would be of great interest as mitochondria are major actors in cancer development, progression and resistance. Owing to the known role of myoferlin in membrane fusion, we assessed its direct involvement in the mitochondrial fusion machinery. Indeed, if myoferlin is a part of the mitochondrial fusion machinery, its silencing together with an unopposed fission would lead to mitochondrial fragmentation. First, we performed immunofluorescence to colocalize myoferlin and a mitochondrial outer membrane 65kDa protein. Colocalization studies showed no significant colocalization. We then performed immunofluorescence to stained myoferlin and the main factor of mitochondrial fusion mitofusin-1/2 (MFN1/2). Colocalization image analysis revealed a 60% colocalization between both proteins. Those results were further confirmed by PLA (Proximity Ligation Assay). Finally, to evaluate a direct protein-protein interaction, we performed a co-immunoprecipitation assay. The main isoform of myoferlin appeared to coimmunoprecipitate with MFN1/2, suggesting a direct interaction between these proteins. [less ▲]

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See detailRole of myoferlin in mitochondrial dynamics and metabolic fitness of PDAC
Anania, Sandy ULiege; Rademaker, Gilles ULiege; Wissocq, Tom ULiege et al

Poster (2019, October)

Our data strongly suggest that myoferlin interacts with MFN. Indeed, if myoferlin is a part of the mitochondrial fusion machinery, its silencing together with an unopposed fission would lead to ... [more ▼]

Our data strongly suggest that myoferlin interacts with MFN. Indeed, if myoferlin is a part of the mitochondrial fusion machinery, its silencing together with an unopposed fission would lead to mitochondrial fragmentation. [less ▲]

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See detailRole of myoferlin in mitochondrial dynamics and metabolic fitness of pancreas cancer
Anania, Sandy ULiege; Rademaker, Gilles ULiege; Wissocq, Tom ULiege et al

Poster (2019, September 06)

Pancreatic cancer is the 7th most common cause of cancer mortality in the world. It is predicted to become the second leading cause of cancer-related death in 2030. Myoferlin is a 230 kDa protein ... [more ▼]

Pancreatic cancer is the 7th most common cause of cancer mortality in the world. It is predicted to become the second leading cause of cancer-related death in 2030. Myoferlin is a 230 kDa protein overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. Recently, our team showed a fragmentation of the mitochondrial network in PDAC cells when myoferlin was depleted using siRNA. Understanding the mechanism underlying this mitochondrial disruption would be of great interest as mitochondria are major actors in cancer development, progression and resistance [less ▲]

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See detailFerlin overview: from membrane to cancer biology
Peulen, Olivier ULiege; Rademaker, Gilles ULiege; Anania, Sandy ULiege et al

in Cells (2019), 8

In mammal myocytes, endothelial cells, and inner ear cells, ferlins are proteins involved in membrane processes such as fusion, recycling, endo- and exocytosis. They harbour several C2 domains allowing ... [more ▼]

In mammal myocytes, endothelial cells, and inner ear cells, ferlins are proteins involved in membrane processes such as fusion, recycling, endo- and exocytosis. They harbour several C2 domains allowing their interaction with phospholipids. Membrane biology is of extreme importance for cell survival and signalling, making Ferlin proteins core machinery indispensable for cancer cell adaptation to hostile environment. Expression of several Ferlin genes was described as altered in several cancer types. Among them myoferlin was recently discovered as highly expressed in several tumoural tissues, and negatively correlated to patient survival. Evidences suggest that myoferlin, when overexpressed, enhances cancer cell proliferation, migration and metabolism by affecting various aspects of membrane biology. Targeting myoferlin using pharmacological compounds, gene transfer technology, or interfering RNA is now considered as an emerging therapeutic strategy. [less ▲]

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