References of "Perrault, Katelynn"
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See detailImplementation of GC×GC-qMS/FID for VOC profiling in the forensic sciences
Perrault, Katelynn ULiege; Cernosek, Terezie; Byrne, Julienne et al

Conference (2019, May)

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See detailComprehensive Approach for Monitoring Human Tissue Degradation
Dubois, Lena ULiege; Stefanuto, Pierre-Hugues ULiege; Perrault, Katelynn ULiege et al

in Chromatographia (2019)

In recent years, comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC–TOFMS) has been reported as a suitable tool for the determination of volatile organic ... [more ▼]

In recent years, comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC–TOFMS) has been reported as a suitable tool for the determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted during the process of cadaveric decomposition. The main aim of the present study was to investigate temporal changes in VOC patterns during the decomposition process of various human tissues. The focus of previous research was mainly on the analysis of VOCs produced by whole cadavers. However, this study aimed to identify whether the VOCs produced during decomposition differ between specific organs, and further, to determine the extent of the variation between cadavers. The sampling process developed for this project allowed inter- and intra-cadaveric comparison. The headspace of heart, lung, liver, kidney and blood was monitored during the decomposition process. Tissue samples from five different cadavers were sampled regularly by dynamic pumping onto sorbent tubes that were further thermally desorbed onto a GC × GC–TOFMS system. A large amount of data (n = 774) was obtained, leading to challenges in the integration, interpretation and representation of the results. Eventually, multivariate statistical methods, such as principal components analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) were applied to the dataset to evaluate trends and differences in subgroups. It was demonstrated that there were subtle differences between the sets of compounds produced from each organ due to the different functions they carry out within the body. However, VOC profiles were more similar among organs from the same cadaver than when comparing samples from different cadavers. Various reasons may cause the differences between the analyzed cadavers, ranging from the individual diet and lifestyle to the time since death. © 2019, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature. [less ▲]

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See detailUse of Blood Volatiles as Trace Evidence
Dubois, Lena ULiege; Perrault, Katelynn ULiege; Stefanuto, Pierre-Hugues ULiege et al

Poster (2019, February 20)

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See detailFingerprinting glues using HS-SPME GC×GC-HRTOFMS: a new powerful method allows tracking glues back in time
Cnuts, Dries ULiege; Perrault, Katelynn ULiege; Stefanuto, Pierre-Hugues ULiege et al

in Archaeometry (2018), 60(6), 1361-1376

The use of glues for stone tool hafting is an important innovation in human evolution. Compared to other organic remains, glues are preserved more frequently, though mainly in small spots. Reliable ... [more ▼]

The use of glues for stone tool hafting is an important innovation in human evolution. Compared to other organic remains, glues are preserved more frequently, though mainly in small spots. Reliable identification requires chemical molecular characterization, which is traditionally performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Current methods of extraction and derivatization prior to GC-MS are destructive and require relatively large samples, which is problematic for prehistoric glue residues. In this paper, we discuss the results of an experimental study using a new method (HS-SPME-GC×GC-HRTOFMS) that proves effective for identifying small quantities of compound glues. The method is non-destructive with an improved sensitivity in comparison to traditional GC-MS, and it has a high potential for prehistoric samples. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of hafting adhesives using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry
Perrault, Katelynn ULiege; Dubois, Lena ULiege; Cnuts, Dries ULiege et al

in Separation Science Plus (2018), 1-12

The determination of the presence and the composition of residues from organic materials on archeological objects allows the behavior of our prehistoric ancestors to be better understood. The functional ... [more ▼]

The determination of the presence and the composition of residues from organic materials on archeological objects allows the behavior of our prehistoric ancestors to be better understood. The functional analysis of tools used for daily life activities, such as hunting or hide working, represents an important source of information. However, the chemical characterization of residues from archeological artifacts represents an analytical challenge. On one hand, the residues are made of different natural materials containing hundreds of chemicals. This complexity requires advanced analytical procedures to separate and identify the constituents. On the other hand, the low quantity and the advanced degradation require sensitive and non-destructive methods. In this study, an approach employing headspace sampling (solid-phase microextraction) with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to highresolution-time-of-flight mass spectrometry was developed for the characterization of adhesive residues on simulated archeological artifacts. First, the performance of the analytical system was evaluated on a standard mixture and a pine resin sample. Next, adhesives and adhesives mixtures were analyzed that represented typical compositions that have been witnessed in archaeological applications. This analytical approach is a gateway into new potential for headspace organic residue characterization as a first step of analysis prior to altering residues for additional characterization. [less ▲]

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See detailVariable‐energy electron ionisation for GC×GC forensic blood VOC profiling
Dubois, Lena ULiege; Perrault, Katelynn ULiege; Stefanuto, Pierre-Hugues ULiege et al

Scientific conference (2017, December)

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See detailRecent Adavances in the Analytical Chemistry of Cadaveric Decomposition
Focant, Jean-François ULiege; Dubois, Lena ULiege; Perrault, Katelynn ULiege et al

in Journal of Integrated Omics (2017, November)

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See detailAdvanced method optimization for volatile aroma profiling of beer using two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry
Stefanuto, Pierre-Hugues ULiege; Perrault, Katelynn ULiege; Dubois, Lena ULiege et al

in Journal of Chromatography. A (2017)

The complex mixture of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in the headspace of Trappist and craft beers was studied to illustrate the efficiency of thermal desorption (TD) comprehensive two ... [more ▼]

The complex mixture of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in the headspace of Trappist and craft beers was studied to illustrate the efficiency of thermal desorption (TD) comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-TOFMS) for highlighting subtle differences between highly complex mixtures of VOCs. Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME), multiple (and classical) stir bar sorptive extraction (mSBSE), static headspace (SHS), and dynamic headspace (DHS) were compared for the extraction of a set of 21 representative flavor compounds of beer aroma. A Box-Behnken surface response methodology experimental design optimization (DOE) was used for convex hull calculation (Delaunay’s triangulation algorithms) of peak dispersion in the chromatographic space. The predicted value of 0.5 for the ratio between the convex hull and the available space was 10% higher than the experimental value, demonstrating the usefulness of the approach to improve optimization of the GC × GC separation. Chemical variations amongst aligned chromatograms were studied by means of Fisher Ratio (FR) determination and F‐distribution threshold filtration at different significance levels (α = 0.05 and 0.01) and based on z‐score normalized area for data reduction. Statistically significant compounds were highlighted following principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). The dendrogram structure not only provided clear visual information about similarities between products but also permitted direct identification of the chemicals and their relative weight in clustering. The effective coupling of DHS-TD-GC × GC-TOFMS with PCA and HCA was able to highlight the differences and common typical VOC patterns among 24 samples of different Trappist and selected Canadian craft beers. [less ▲]

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