References of "Parmentier, Eric"
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See detailSimultaneous production of two kinds of sounds in relation with sonic mechanism in the boxfsh Ostracion meleagris and O. cubicus
Parmentier, Eric ULiege; Solagna, Laura; Bertucci, Frédéric et al

in Scientific Reports (in press)

In fshes, sonic abilities for communication purpose usually involve a single mechanism. We describe here the sonic mechanism and sounds in two species of boxfsh, the spotted trunkfsh Ostracion meleagris ... [more ▼]

In fshes, sonic abilities for communication purpose usually involve a single mechanism. We describe here the sonic mechanism and sounds in two species of boxfsh, the spotted trunkfsh Ostracion meleagris and the yellow boxfsh Ostracion cubicus. The sonic mechanism utilizes a T-shaped swimbladder with a swimbladder fenestra and two separate sonic muscle pairs. Extrinsic vertical muscles attach to the vertebral column and the swimbladder. Perpendicularly and below these muscles, longitudinal intrinsic muscles cover the swimbladder fenestra. Sounds are exceptional since they are made of two distinct types produced in a sequence. In both species, humming sounds consist of long series (up to 45s) of hundreds of regular low-amplitude pulses. Hums are often interspersed with irregular click sounds with an amplitude that is ten times greater in O. meleagris and forty times greater in O. cubicus. There is no relationship between fsh size and many acoustic characteristics because muscle contraction rate dictates the fundamental frequency. We suggest that hums and clicks are produced by either separate muscles or by a combination of the two. The mechanism complexity supports an investment of boxfsh in this communication channel and underline sounds as having important functions in their way of life. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional diversity in biters: the evolutionary morphology of the oral jaw system in pacus, piranhas and relatives (Teleostei: Serrasalmidae)
Huby, Alessia ULiege; Lowie, Aurélien; Herrel, Anthony et al

in Biological Journal of the Linnean Society (2019)

Serrasalmid fishes form a highly specialized group of biters that show a large trophic diversity, ranging from pacus able to crush seeds to piranhas capable of cutting flesh. Their oral jaw system has ... [more ▼]

Serrasalmid fishes form a highly specialized group of biters that show a large trophic diversity, ranging from pacus able to crush seeds to piranhas capable of cutting flesh. Their oral jaw system has been hypothesized to be forceful, but variation in bite performance and morphology with respect to diet has not previously been investigated. We tested whether herbivorous species have higher bite forces, larger jaw muscles and more robust jaws than carnivorous species. We measured in vivo and theoretical bite forces in 27 serrasalmid species. We compared the size of the adductor mandibulae muscle, the jaw mechanical advantages, the type of jaw occlusion, and the size and shape of the lower jaw. We also examined the association between bite performance and functional morphological traits of the oral jaw system. Contrary to our predictions, carnivorous piranhas deliver stronger bites than their herbivorous counterparts. The size of the adductor mandibulae muscle varies with bite force and muscles are larger in carnivorous species. Our study highlights an underestimated level of functional morphological diversity in a fish group of exclusive biters. We provide evidence that the trophic specialization towards carnivory in piranhas results from changes in the configuration of the adductor mandibulae muscle and the lower jaw shape, which have major effects on bite performance and bite strategy. [less ▲]

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See detailActinopterygians: Head, Jaws and Muscles
Huby, Alessia ULiege; Parmentier, Eric ULiege

in Ziermann, Janine M.; Diaz, Raul E.; Diogo, Rui (Eds.) Heads, Jaws, and Muscles - Anatomical, Functional, and Developmental Diversity in Chordate Evolution (2019)

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See detailBirth and Evolution of Acoustic Communication in Piranhas (Serrasalmidae)
Parmentier, Eric ULiege; Raick, Xavier ULiege; Vigouroux, Régis et al

Conference (2019, January)

Within piranhas, sound production is known in carnivorous species whereas herbivorous species were thought to be mute. As these carnivorous sonic species have a complex sonic apparatus, we hypothesise ... [more ▼]

Within piranhas, sound production is known in carnivorous species whereas herbivorous species were thought to be mute. As these carnivorous sonic species have a complex sonic apparatus, we hypothesise that transitional forms could be found in some serrasalmid species. We investigate sound production in different species covering all the Serrasalmidae phylogenetic tree to understand the evolution of the sonic mechanism in this family. The results highlight the evolutionary transition from a simple sound-producing mechanism without specialised sonic structures in the herbivorous species (Piaractus and Myloplus) to a sonic mechanism involving large, fast-contracting sonic muscles vibrating the swimbladder in the genera Pygocentrus and Serrasalmus. Hypaxial muscles in herbivores primarily serve locomotion, but some bundles caused sound production during swimming accelerations, meaning these muscles have gained a dual function. Sound production therefore seems to have been acquired through an exaptation event, i.e. the development of a new function (sound production) in existing structures initially shaped for a different purpose (locomotion). In further evolutionary stages (Catoprion and Pygopristis), some bundles are distinguishable from other hypaxial muscles and insert directly on the swimbladder. At this stage, the primary function (locomotion) is lost in favour of the secondary function (sound production). In the last stage (Pygocentrus and Serrasalmus), the muscles and insertion sites are larger and the innervation involves more spinal nerves, improving calling abilities. The comparison of sounds and sonic mechanisms shows the evolution of acoustic communication corresponds to a trajectory where the initial exaptation event is then subject to adaptations. [less ▲]

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See detailVertebrae are the backbone of cetacean diversity: How morphological innovations sustained dolphin explosive radiation
Gillet, Amandine ULiege; Frederich, Bruno ULiege; Parmentier, Eric ULiege

Conference (2018, December 15)

With approximately 90 living species, whales, dolphins and porpoises represent the most diverse clade of extant marine tetrapods. This high level of taxonomic diversity has been often related to ocean ... [more ▼]

With approximately 90 living species, whales, dolphins and porpoises represent the most diverse clade of extant marine tetrapods. This high level of taxonomic diversity has been often related to ocean restructuring that resulted in an explosive radiation of oceanic dolphins within the past 10 Ma. However, the environmental factor hypothesis can be restrictive as it does not entirely explain how organisms have faced environmental constraints suggesting that other factors could also explain this burst of diversification. In marine taxa such as sharks and ichthyosaurs, morphological variations have been linked to several life-styles which have sustained their diversification in different adaptive zones. The aim of our study is to establish the relationship between the morphology of the axial skeleton of cetaceans, their ecology and their diversification. By combining the most extensive morphological dataset describing the axial skeleton of 73 cetacean species with phylogenetic comparative methods, we demonstrate that extant cetaceans have followed two distinct evolutionary pathways in relation to their ecology. Most oceanic species evolved towards an increased body size leading to gigantism in baleen whales. Interestingly, dolphins have invested another way. While riverine and coastal species exhibit a small body size, lengthened vertebrae and a low vertebral count, small oceanic dolphins show an extremely high number of short vertebrae. We discuss how these modifications have operated as key innovations that contributed to the explosive radiation of dolphins. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat do the Brazilian piranhas have to tell us?
Raick, Xavier ULiege; Huby, Alessia ULiege; Kurchevski, Gregório et al

Conference (2018, December 15)

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See detailSea, sound and sun: bioacoustics of triggerfishes (Balistidae)
Raick, Xavier ULiege; Lecchini, David; Kever, Loïc ULiege et al

Conference (2018, October 11)

Triggerfishes (Balistidae) are common fishes of shallow tropical waters that are known to produce sounds. We described these sounds in Rhinecanthus aculeatus as a series of pulses that result from ... [more ▼]

Triggerfishes (Balistidae) are common fishes of shallow tropical waters that are known to produce sounds. We described these sounds in Rhinecanthus aculeatus as a series of pulses that result from alternate sweeping movements of the right and left pectoral fins, which push modified scales that are forced against the swim bladder wall. Pulses from each fin occur in consecutive pairs. Highspeed videos indicate that each pulse consists of two cycles: the first part of each one corresponds to the inward buckling of the scutes, whereas the second part of the cycle correspond to an apparent passive recoil of the scutes and swim bladder wall. More recently, we show that the sound production mechanism is similar in others Balistidae species. According to recent phylogenetic data and shared morphological features, this mechanism could be common to the majority of Balistidae family members. In the sister family (Monacanthidae), similar morphological features have not been described and sounds resulting from pectoral fin movements have not been reported. Therefore, we can reasonably argue that the detailed sonic mechanism using pectoral fins, scutes and the swim bladder could be a strong Balistidae feature. It could have evolved from locomotory movement and be a new example of exaptation. [less ▲]

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See detailSound production and sonic apparatus in deep-living cusk-eels (Genypterus chilensis and Genypterus maculatus)
Parmentier, Eric ULiege; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULiege; Plenevaux, Alain ULiege et al

in Deep-Sea Research. Part I, Oceanographic Research Papers (2018)

Cusk-eels (Ophidiidae) are known sound producers, but many species live in deep water where sounds are difficult to record. For these species sonic ability has been inferred from inner anatomy. Genypterus ... [more ▼]

Cusk-eels (Ophidiidae) are known sound producers, but many species live in deep water where sounds are difficult to record. For these species sonic ability has been inferred from inner anatomy. Genypterus (subfamily Ophidiinae) are demersal fishes inhabiting the continental shelf and slope at depths between 50 and 800 m. Males and females G. maculatus have been maintained together in a tank and 9 unsexed specimens of G. chilensis in a second tank, providing a valuable opportunity to record the sounds of living species usually found at great depths. Genypterus chilensis and G. maculatus respectively produced one and two sound types mainly between 7 and 10 pm. Sound 1 in Genypterus maculatus consists of trains of pulses that vary in amplitude and pulse period; call 2 sounded like a growl that results from the rapid emission of pulses that define sound 1. Genypterus chilensis produced a growl having an unusual feature since the first peak of the second pulse has always greater amplitude than all other peaks. These sounds are probably related to courtship behavior since floating eggs are found after night calls. The anatomical structures of the sound-producing organ in both species present an important panel of highly derived characters including three pairs of sonic muscles, a neural arch that pivots on the first vertebral body and a thick swimbladder with unusual features. Sonic structures are similar between species and between sexes. Therefore both biological sexes are capable of sound production although precedent from shallow ophidiids and sonic fishes in general suggests that males are more likely to produce courtship calls. This study reports two main types of information. It demonstrates that two deep-living species are capable of sound production, which is a pioneer step in the acoustic study of deep-sea fauna. Recorded sounds should also help to locate fish in open sea. As these species are currently used to diversify the aquaculture industry in Chile, deeper studies on their acoustic behavior should also help to target spawning period and to identify mature specimens. [less ▲]

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See detailAcoustic Complexity of fish vocal communities: a field and controlled validation
Bolgan, Marta ULiege; Amorim, Clara; Fonseca, Paolo et al

in Scientific Reports (2018), 8(10559),

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See detailComparative morpho-functional study of the feeding system in different species of Serrasalmidae (Teleostei: Characiformes)
Huby, Alessia ULiege; Lowie, Aurélien; Herrel, Anthony et al

Conference (2018, April 26)

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See detailPiranhas vocalizations: morphology, bioacoustics & ecoacoustics of Serrasalmidae
Raick, Xavier ULiege; Parmentier, Eric ULiege

Conference (2018, April 26)

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See detailAbondance et diversité acoustique des populations de poissons dans la baie de Calvi
Bolgan, Marta ULiege; Di Iorio, Lucia; Lejeune, Pierre ULiege et al

Conference (2018, April 10)

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See detailEtude morpho-fonctionnelle comparée du système de prise de nourriture chez différentes espèces de Serrasalmidae (Characiformes)
Huby, Alessia ULiege; LOWIE, Aurélien; HERREL, Anthony et al

Conference (2018, March 29)

Si la majorité des histoires sur les piranhas sont généralement sanglantes et exagérées, elles reposent néanmoins sur un trait de caractère : la force développée par leurs mâchoires pendant la prise de ... [more ▼]

Si la majorité des histoires sur les piranhas sont généralement sanglantes et exagérées, elles reposent néanmoins sur un trait de caractère : la force développée par leurs mâchoires pendant la prise de nourriture est réellement exceptionnelle. Il a en effet été avancé que les piranhas noirs (Serrasalmus rhombeus) peuvent exercer une force de morsure très importante puisque, à taille égale, elle serait trois fois plus puissante que celle des grands requins blancs. Cette force ne serait pas le seul apanage des piranhas mangeurs de chair, car une force importante semble aussi requise chez les espèces-sœurs herbivores pour pouvoir casser les coquilles des graines et des fruits dont elles se nourrissent. La force développée par les mâchoires de ces herbivores pendant la prise de nourriture n’a cependant jamais été étudiée, ni comparée avec celle des piranhas carnivores. L’objectif de ce travail de recherche est de mesurer des forces de morsure chez diverses espèces de Serrasalmidae et de comparer le système de prise de nourriture des deux régimes alimentaires (carnivore vs herbivore). Différentes approches ont été réalisées. (1) Des forces de morsure ont été mesurées in-vivo chez quatorze espèces de poissons Serrasalmidae (7 espèces carnivores vs 7 espèces herbivores) à l’aide d’un transducteur de force piézo-électrique. (2) Des forces de morsure théoriques ont été calculées à partir de la section transversale du muscle adducteur associé aux mâchoires. (3) La morphologie du muscle adducteur de la mandibule et la forme de la mâchoire inférieure ont été examinées chez ces mêmes espèces via des méthodes de dissection et de morphométrie géométrique. (4) Pour la mâchoire inférieure, des rapports de bras de levier ont été estimés pour déterminer et comparer le mode de transmission des forces de morsure. Quelle que soit l’approche envisagée, les espèces carnivores ont une valeur de force de morsure significativement plus élevée que celle des espèces herbivores de même taille et même masse. Le muscle adducteur de la mandibule est d’ailleurs beaucoup plus développé chez les espèces carnivores (1.5% de la masse totale du corps) par rapport aux espèces herbivores (0.4%). De plus, les carnivores ont une forme de mâchoire inférieure distincte de celle de leurs cousins herbivores. La mandibule des espèces carnivores est plus allongée avec un plus grand nombre de dents disposées sur une structure dentigère plus grande. La mandibule possède aussi un os articulaire réduit. Cette forme amène l’alignement de l’articulation « carré-articulaire » sur la ligne d’occlusion des dents. Par conséquent, la mâchoire des piranhas présente des points de ressemblance avec une paire de ciseaux. Les espèces herbivores ont par contre un os articulaire plus grand et plus large qui modifie la morphologie de la mâchoire inférieure avec le positionnement des dents au niveau antérieur. Le système de prise de nourriture rencontré chez les herbivores se rapproche de celui d’un étau. [less ▲]

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See detailTaxonomic validation of Encheliophis chardewalli with description of calling abilities
Parmentier, Eric ULiege; Fine, Michael; Berthe, Cécile et al

in Journal of Morphology (2018)

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See detailNeurogenomic profiling reveals distinct gene expression profiles between brain parts that are consistent in Ophthalmotilapia cichlids
Derycke, Sofie; Kever, Loïc ULiege; Van den Berge, K et al

in Frontiers in Neuroscience (2018), 12

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (9 ULiège)