References of "PETERMANS, Jean"
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See detailValidated assessment of gait sub-phase durations in older adults using an accelerometer-based ambulatory system
Boutaayamou, Mohamed ULiege; GILLAIN, Sophie ULiege; Schwartz, Cédric ULiege et al

in Proceedings of the 11th International Joint Conference on Biomedical Engineering Systems and Technologies (BIOSTEC 2018) (in press)

Validated extraction of gait sub-phase durations using an ambulatory accelerometer-based system is a current unmet need to quantify subtle changes during the walking of older adults. In this paper, we ... [more ▼]

Validated extraction of gait sub-phase durations using an ambulatory accelerometer-based system is a current unmet need to quantify subtle changes during the walking of older adults. In this paper, we describe (1) a signal processing algorithm to automatically extract not only durations of stride, stance, swing, and double support phases, but also durations of sub-phases that refine the stance and swing phases from foot-worn accelerometer signals in comfortable walking of older adults, and (2) the validation of this extraction using reference data provided by a gold standard system. The results show that we achieve a high agreement between our method and the reference method in the extraction of (1) the temporal gait events involved in the estimation of the phase/sub-phase durations, namely heel strike (HS), toe strike (TS), toe-off (TO), maximum of heel clearance (MHC), and maximum of toe clearance (MTC), with an accuracy and precision that range from ‒3.6 ms to 4.0 ms, and 6.5 ms to 12.0 ms, respectively, and (2) the gait phase/sub-phase durations, namely stride, stance, swing, double support phases, and HS to TS, TO to MHC, MHC to MTC, and MTC to HS sub-phases, with an accuracy and precision that range from ‒4 ms to 5 ms, and 9 ms to 15 ms, respectively, in comfortable walking of a thirty-eight older adults ( (mean ± standard deviation) 71.0 ± 4.1 years old). This demonstrates that the developed accelerometer-based algorithm can extract validated temporal gait events and phase/sub-phase durations, in comfortable walking of older adults, with a promising degree of accuracy/precision compared to reference data, warranting further studies. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of the performance of five screening methods for sarcopenia.
Locquet, Médéa ULiege; Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege et al

in Clinical Epidemiology (2018), 10

Background: Sarcopenia leads to serious adverse health consequences. There is a dearth of screening tools for this condition, and performances of these instruments have rarely been evaluated. Our aim was ... [more ▼]

Background: Sarcopenia leads to serious adverse health consequences. There is a dearth of screening tools for this condition, and performances of these instruments have rarely been evaluated. Our aim was to compare the performance of five screening tools for identifying elders at risk of sarcopenia against five diagnostic definitions. Subjects and methods: We gathered cross-sectional data of elders from the SarcoPhAge (“Sarco”penia and “Ph”ysical Impairment with Advancing “Age”) study. Lean mass was measured with X-ray absorptiometry, muscle strength with a dynamometer and physical performance with the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) test. Performances of screening methods were described using sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and area under the curve (AUC), according to five diagnostic definitions of sarcopenia. For each screening tool, optimal cutoff points were computed using two methods. Results: A total of 306 subjects (74.8±5.9 years, 59.5% women) were included. The prevalence of sarcopenia varied from 5.7% to 16.7% depending on the definition. The best sensitivity (up to 100%) and the best NPV (up to 99.1%) were obtained with the screening test of Ishii et al, regardless of the definition applied. The highest AUC (up to 0.914) was also demonstrated by the instrument of Ishii et al. The most specific tool was the algorithm of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP; up to 91.1%). All NPVs were above 87.0%, and all PPVs were below 51.0%. New cutoffs related to each screening instrument were also proposed to better discriminate sarcopenic individuals from non-sarcopenic individuals. Conclusion: Screening instruments for sarcopenia can be relevantly used in clinical practice to make sure to identify individuals who do not suffer from the syndrome. The screening test of Ishii et al showed better properties in terms of distinguishing those at risk of sarcopenia from those who were not at risk. [less ▲]

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See detailPitfalls in the measurement of muscle mass; a need for a reference standard.
Buckinx, Fanny ULiege; Landi, Francesco; Cesari, francesco et al

in Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle (2018)

Background: All proposed definitions of sarcopenia include the measurement of muscle mass, but the techniques and threshold values used vary. Indeed, the literature does not establish consensus on the ... [more ▼]

Background: All proposed definitions of sarcopenia include the measurement of muscle mass, but the techniques and threshold values used vary. Indeed, the literature does not establish consensus on the best technique for measuring lean body mass. Thus, the objective measurement of sarcopenia is hampered by limitations intrinsic to assessment tools. The aim of this study was to review the methods to assess muscle mass and to reach consensus on the development of a reference standard. Methods: Literature reviews were performed by members of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis working group on frailty and sarcopenia. Face-to-face meetings were organized for the whole group to make amendments and discuss further recommendations. Results: A wide range of techniques can be used to assess muscle mass. Cost, availability, and ease of use can determine whether the techniques are better suited to clinical practice or are more useful for research. No one technique subserves all requirements but dual energy X-ray absorptiometry could be considered as a reference standard (but not a gold standard) for measuring muscle lean body mass. Conclusions: Based on the feasibility, accuracy, safety, and low cost, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry can be considered as the reference standard for measuring muscle mass. [less ▲]

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See detailUsage des statines en gériatrie : quid de la dé-prescription
GILLAIN, Sophie ULiege; PETERMANS, Jean ULiege

Scientific conference (2017, May)

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See detailLes gérontechnologies au service des patients et des aidants
Gillain, Daniel ULiege; PETERMANS, Jean ULiege

Scientific conference (2017, May)

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See detailPrevalence of sarcopenia accoring to 10 different operational definitions of the frailty.
Buckinx, Fanny ULiege; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege; Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege et al

in Osteoporosis International (2017, March), 28 Suppl 1

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See detailThe SarcoPhAge study: evolution of sarcopenic subjects after 2 years of follow-up.
Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege; Locquet, Médéa ULiege; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege et al

in Osteoporosis International (2017, March), 28 Suppl 1

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See detailSarcopenia in nursing home residents: the senior cohort.
Buckinx, Fanny ULiege; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege; Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege et al

in Osteoporosis International (2017, March), 28 Suppl 1

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See detailAdverse Health Events Related to Self-Medication Practices Among Elderly: A Systematic Review.
Locquet, Médéa ULiege; Honvo, Germain ULiege; Rabenda, Véronique ULiege et al

in Drugs & Aging (2017)

BACKGROUND: Older adults often resort to self-medication to relieve symptoms of their current illnesses; however, the risks of this practice are multiplied in old age. In particular, this age group is ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Older adults often resort to self-medication to relieve symptoms of their current illnesses; however, the risks of this practice are multiplied in old age. In particular, this age group is more vulnerable to adverse drug events because of the physiological changes that occur due to senescence. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to obtain an overview of the adverse health events related to self-medication among subjects aged 60 years and over through a systematic review of the literature. METHODS: A study of relevant articles was conducted among databases (MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and EBM Reviews-Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews). Eligibility criteria were established and applied by two investigators to include suitable studies. The results and outcomes of interest were detailed in a descriptive report. RESULTS: The electronic search identified 4096 references, and the full texts of 74 were reviewed, of which four were retained in the analysis: three had a cross-sectional design and one prospectively followed elderly subjects. The first study showed a 26.7% prevalence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) among elders, the second study found a 75% prevalence of side effects, and, finally, a prospective study showed an ADR incidence of 4.5% among self-medicated elders. These studies showed that adverse health events related to self-medication are relatively frequently reported. They also highlighted that analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs are the most self-medicated products, while vitamins and dietary supplements also appear to be frequently self-administered, but by older individuals. CONCLUSIONS: Studies on self-medication in the elderly and its adverse health effects are clearly lacking. There is a need to perform prospective studies on this topic to gain a clear understanding of the extent of this problem and to enhance the awareness of health professionals to better inform seniors. [less ▲]

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See detailQuality of life in sarcopenia measured with the SarQoL®: impact of the use of different diagnosis definitions
Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege; Locquet, Médéa ULiege; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege et al

in Aging Clinical and Experimental Research (2017)

Background: The SarQoL® is a recently developed quality of life questionnaire specific to sarcopenia. Aim: To compare the quality of life (QoL) of subjects identified as sarcopenic with that of non ... [more ▼]

Background: The SarQoL® is a recently developed quality of life questionnaire specific to sarcopenia. Aim: To compare the quality of life (QoL) of subjects identified as sarcopenic with that of non-sarcopenic subjects when using six different operational definitions of sarcopenia. Methods: Participants of the SarcoPhAge study (Belgium) completed the SarQoL®. Among the six definitions used, two were based on low lean mass alone (Baumgartner, Delmonico), and four required both low muscle mass and decreased performance (Cruz-Jentoft, Studenski, Fielding, Morley). Physical assessments included measurements of muscle mass with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, muscle strength with a handheld dynamometer and gait speed over a 4-m distance. Results: A total of 387 subjects completed the SarQoL®. Prevalence of sarcopenia varied widely across the different definitions. Using the SarQoL®, a lower QoL was found for sarcopenic subjects compared to non-sarcopenic subjects when using the definitions of Cruz-Jentoft (56.3 ± 13.4 vs 68.0 ± 15.2, p < 0.001), Studenski (51.1 ± 14.5 vs 68.2 ± 14.6, p < 0.001), Fielding (53.8 ± 12.0 vs 68.3 ± 15.1, p < 0.001), and Morley (53.3 ± 12.5 vs 67.1 ± 15.3, p < 0.001). No QoL difference between sarcopenic and non-sarcopenic subjects was found when using the definitions of Baumgartner or Delmonico, which were only based on the notion of decreased muscle mass. Discussion and conclusions: The SarQoL® was able to discriminate sarcopenic from non-sarcopenic subjects with regard to their QoL, regardless of the definition used for diagnosis as long as the definition includes an assessment of both muscle mass and muscle function. Poorer QoL, therefore, seems more related to muscle function than to muscle mass. © 2017 The Author(s) [less ▲]

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See detailGerontechnology : don't miss the train, but which is the right carriage
PETERMANS, Jean ULiege

in European Geriatric Medicine (2017), 8

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See detailChronic illness needing palliative care in Kinshasa hospitals, democratic republic of Congo
Lofandjola Masumbuku, Jacques ULiege; Sumaili Kiswaya, Ernest; Mairiaux, Philippe ULiege et al

in Tropical Medicine and Health (2017), 45

Chronic illnesses are a major public health problem in low-income countries. In the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), few data are available, especially in palliative care. In this context, the ... [more ▼]

Chronic illnesses are a major public health problem in low-income countries. In the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), few data are available, especially in palliative care. In this context, the present study aimed at describing the patterns of diseases in Kinshasa hospitals as well as risk factors associated with patients’ evolving status and length of hospital stay. [less ▲]

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See detailValidation of the SarQoL, a specific health-related quality of life questionnaire for Sarcopenia
Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege; Biver, Emmanuel; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege et al

in Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle (2017), 8(2), 238-44

Background A specific self-administrated health-related quality of life questionnaire for sarcopenia, the Sarcopenia and Quality Of Life (SarQoL®), has been recently developed. This questionnaire is ... [more ▼]

Background A specific self-administrated health-related quality of life questionnaire for sarcopenia, the Sarcopenia and Quality Of Life (SarQoL®), has been recently developed. This questionnaire is composed of 55 items translated into 22 questions and organized into seven domains of quality of life. The objective of the present work is to evaluate the psychometric properties (discriminative power, validity, reliability, floor and ceiling effects) of the SarQoL® questionnaire. Methods Sarcopenic subjects were recruited in an outpatient clinic in Liège, Belgium and were diagnosed according to the algorithm developed by the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People. We compared the score of the SarQoL® between sarcopenic and non-sarcopenic subjects using a logistic regression after adjustment for potential confounding variables. Internal consistency reliability was determined using Cronbach’s alpha coefficient; construct validity was assessed using convergent and divergent validities. Test–retest reliability was verified after a two-week interval using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). At last, floor and ceiling effects were also tested. Results A total of 296 subjects with a median age of 73.3 (68.9–78.6) years were recruited for this study. Among them, 43 were diagnosed sarcopenic. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, the total score and the scores of the different dimensions of the SarQoL® questionnaire were significantly lower for sarcopenic than for non-sarcopenic subjects (54.7 (45.9– 66.3) for sarcopenic vs. 67.8 (57.3 – 79.0) for non sarcopenic, OR 0.93 (95%CI 0.90–0.96)). Regarding internal consistency, the Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was 0.87. The SarQoL® questionnaire data showed good correlation with some domains of the Short-Form 36 (SF-36) and the EuroQoL 5-dimension (EQ-5D) questionnaires and with the mobility test. An excellent agreement between the test and the retest was found with an ICC of 0.91 (95% CI 0.82–0.95). At last, neither floor nor ceiling effects were detected. Conclusions The SarQoL® questionnaire is valid, consistent, and reliable and can therefore be recommended for clinical and research purposes. However, its sensitivity to change needs to be assessed in future longitudinal studies. [less ▲]

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See detailPrevalence of sarcopenia in a population of nursing home residents according to their frailty status: results of the SENIOR cohort
Buckinx, Fanny ULiege; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege; BRUNOIS, Théo ULiege et al

in Journal of Musculoskeletal & Neuronal Interactions (2017), 17(3), 209-17

Objective: To investigate the relationship between frailty and sarcopenia, by evaluating the prevalence of sarcopenia among frail, pre-frail and robust elderly nursing home residents in Belgium. Methods ... [more ▼]

Objective: To investigate the relationship between frailty and sarcopenia, by evaluating the prevalence of sarcopenia among frail, pre-frail and robust elderly nursing home residents in Belgium. Methods: This is an analysis of baseline data collected from the SENIOR (Sample of Elderly Nursing home Individuals: an Observational Research) cohort. All subjects received a sarcopenia evaluation, based on the definition proposed by the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP). The frailty evaluation was primarily based on FRIED’s definition but also on 9 other operational definitions. Results: A total of 662 subjects (73.1% of women) were included in this analysis (mean age: 83.2±8.99 years). The prevalence of sarcopenia was 38.1% whereas the prevalence of frail and pre-frail persons was respectively 24.7% and 61.4%. Among frail, pre-frail and robust subjects, respectively 47%, 38.9% and 16.3% were diagnosed sarcopenic. The prevalence of sarcopenia according to ten different operational definitions of frailty ranged between 32.8 % (i.e. Frail scale Status and Frailty Index) and 47% (i.e. Fried definition). Conclusion: This research highlights that over a third of nursing home residents are sarcopenic and the percentage is almost 50% among frail subjects; those latter constitute about 1 in 4 of the population of nursing home residents studied here. [less ▲]

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See detailPrevalence of Frailty in Nursing Home Residents According to Various Diagnostic Tools
Buckinx, Fanny ULiege; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege; GILLAIN, Sophie ULiege et al

in Journal of Frailty & Aging (2017), 6(3), 122-8

Background: Although the theoretical foundations of frailty are well established in the literature, it remains an evolving concept lacking any unique definition or diagnostic criteria for use in clinical ... [more ▼]

Background: Although the theoretical foundations of frailty are well established in the literature, it remains an evolving concept lacking any unique definition or diagnostic criteria for use in clinical practice and epidemiological research. No consensus exists about the accurate prevalence rates of frailty. The various operational definitions of frailty can at least partly explain such discrepancies. Objective: To compare the prevalence of frailty, measured with different diagnostic tools, among elderly nursing home residents. Design: This is an analysis of baseline data collected among the SENIOR (Sample of Nursing home Elderly Individuals: an Observational Research) cohort. Setting: Nursing homes. Population: A total of 662 volunteer subjects from 28 nursing homes were included in this analysis. Among them, the mean age was 83.2 ± 8.99 years and 484 (72.5%) of them were women. Measurement: The percentages of frail and non-frail subjects were calculated according to 10 different definitions. Results: Prevalence of frailty varies from 1.70% (Frailty Index) to 76.3% (Groningen Frailty Indicator) depending on the tool used. Conclusions: The prevalence of frailty is highly dependent on the diagnostic tool used. It would be necessary to reach a consensus on which diagnostic tools to use if one wishes to have comparable data obtained in epidemiological studies. [less ▲]

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See detailPrediction of the Incidence of Falls and Deaths Among Elderly Nursing Home Residents: The SENIOR Study.
Buckinx, Fanny ULiege; Croisier, Jean-Louis ULiege; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege et al

in Journal of the American Medical Directors Association (2017), (Online),

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate, among nursing home residents, the extent to which the various operational definitions of frailty predict mortality and falls at 1 year. METHODS: We ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate, among nursing home residents, the extent to which the various operational definitions of frailty predict mortality and falls at 1 year. METHODS: We studied 662 participants from the Sample of Elderly Nursing home Individuals: An Observational Research (SENIOR) cohort aged 83.2 ± 8.99 years, including 484 (72.5%) women and living in nursing homes. Among this cohort, 584 and 565 participants, respectively, were monitored over 12 months for mortality assessment and for occurrence of falls (ie, by mean of their medical records). Each patient was subjected to a clinical examination at baseline, during which many original clinical characteristics were collected. Stepwise regression analyses were carried out to predict mortality and falls. RESULTS: Among the participants included in the study, 93 (15.9%) died and 211 (37.3%) experienced a fall during the 1-year of follow-up. After adjustment, none of the definitions of frailty assessed predicted the 1-year occurrence of negative health outcomes. When comparing the clinical characteristics of deceased participants and those still alive, being a man (OR = 1.89; 95% CI: 1.19-3.01; P = .002) and being diagnosed with sarcopenia (OR = 1.7; 95% CI: 1.1-2.92; P = .03) were independent factors associated with 1-year mortality. Other independent factors that were significantly associated with the 1-year occurrence of falls were the results obtained with the Tinetti test (OR = 0.93; 95% CI: 0.87-0.98; P = .04), with the grip strength test (OR = 0.95; 95% CI: 0.90-0.98, P = .03), and with the isometric strength test of elbow extensors (OR = 0.93; 95%CI: 0.87-0.97; P = .04). CONCLUSIONS: Within the operational definitions of frailty assessed, none is sufficiently sensitive to predict the occurrence of falls and deaths at 1 year among nursing home residents. Globally, the frequency of undesirable health outcomes seems to be higher among participants with lower muscle strength and mobility. Medical strategy or adapted physical activity, with the aim of improving specific isometric muscle strength and mobility could potentially, but significantly, reduce the occurrence of falls and even deaths. [less ▲]

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See detailResults of the SarcoPhAge study after 2 years of follow-up.
Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege; Locquet, Médéa ULiege; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege et al

in Journal of Frailty & Aging (2017), 6 Suppl 1

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See detailL'étude SarcoPhAge: devenir des sujets sarcopéniques après 2 ans de suivi.
Beaudart, Charlotte ULiege; Locquet, Médéa ULiege; Reginster, Jean-Yves ULiege et al

in L'Année Gérontologique (2017), 31(1), 42

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