References of "Oury, Cécile"
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See detailPlatelet-rich plasma (PRP) and tendon healing: comparison between fresh and frozen-thawed PRP
KAUX, Jean-François ULiege; Libertiaux, Vincent; Dupont, Laura ULiege et al

in Platelets (in press)

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is increasingly used in the treatment of musculoskeletal diseases. Its preservation by freezing it for the realization of multiple injections in clinical use has never been ... [more ▼]

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is increasingly used in the treatment of musculoskeletal diseases. Its preservation by freezing it for the realization of multiple injections in clinical use has never been discussed. Calcaneal tendons of rats were surgically sectioned. Platelet concentration of the PRP was 2.5 x 106/μl with autologous plasma of rats. Frozen-thawed PRP was prepared by performing two cycles of freezing and thawing on PRP aliquots. Both platelet preparations were injected in the lesion. Biomechanical and histological evaluations were carried out after 7, 20 or 40 days post surgery. After 7 and 40 days, no significant difference was observed between the PRP and the frozen-thawed PRP group. There is however a difference 20 days after surgery: the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) was greater in the fresh PRP group. No obvious difference with histological aspect was observed between the two groups. In conclusion, fresh PRP and frozen-thawed PRP injections can lead to similar results in the healing process of section calcaneal tendons of rats. Improvements with fresh PRP are slight. PRP could thus be frozen to be preserved if multiple injections are needed (e.g. osteoarthritis). [less ▲]

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See detailExtracorporeal CO2 removal and regional citrate anticoagulation in an experimental model of hypercapnic acidosis.
Morimont, Philippe ULiege; Habran, Simon; Desaive, Thomas ULiege et al

in Artificial Organs (2019)

Low flow extracorporeal veno-venous CO2 removal (ECCO2 R) therapy is used to remove CO2 while reducing ventilation intensity. However, the use of this technique is limited because efficiency of CO2 ... [more ▼]

Low flow extracorporeal veno-venous CO2 removal (ECCO2 R) therapy is used to remove CO2 while reducing ventilation intensity. However, the use of this technique is limited because efficiency of CO2 removal and potential beneficial effects on pulmonary hemodynamics are not precisely established. Moreover, this technique requires anticoagulation that may induce severe complications in critically ill patients. This study aimed at determining precisely efficiency of CO2 extraction and its effects on right ventricular (RV) afterload, and comparing regional anticoagulation with citrate to systemic heparin anticoagulation during ECCO2 R. ECCO2 R was highly efficient to normalize pH and PaCO2 and to reduce RV afterload resulting from hypercapnic acidosis. Regional anticoagulation with citrate solution was as effective as standard heparin anticoagulation but did not improve CO2 removal and lead to more hypocalcemia and hypotension. [less ▲]

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See detailDUSP3 genetic depletion predispose to obesity-induced hepatocellular carcinoma
Jacques, Sophie ULiege; Vandereyken, Maud; Arjomand, Arash et al

Poster (2019, January 21)

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See detailEditorial: From Biology to Clinical Management: An Update on Aortic Valve Disease.
Oury, Cécile ULiege; Nchimi, Alain; Lancellotti, Patrizio ULiege

in Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine (2019), 6

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See detailMaturation of heart valve cell populations during postnatal remodeling.
Hulin, Alexia ULiege; Hortells, Luis; Gomez-Stallons, M. Victoria et al

in Development (Cambridge, England) (2019), 146(12),

Heart valve cells mediate extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling during postnatal valve leaflet stratification, but phenotypic and transcriptional diversity of valve cells in development is largely unknown ... [more ▼]

Heart valve cells mediate extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling during postnatal valve leaflet stratification, but phenotypic and transcriptional diversity of valve cells in development is largely unknown. Single cell analysis of mouse heart valve cells was used to evaluate cell heterogeneity during postnatal ECM remodeling and leaflet morphogenesis. The transcriptomic analysis of single cells from postnatal day (P)7 and P30 murine aortic (AoV) and mitral (MV) heart valves uncovered distinct subsets of melanocytes, immune and endothelial cells present at P7 and P30. By contrast, interstitial cell populations are different from P7 to P30. P7 valve leaflets exhibit two distinct collagen- and glycosaminoglycan-expressing interstitial cell clusters, and prevalent ECM gene expression. At P30, four interstitial cell clusters are apparent with leaflet specificity and differential expression of complement factors, ECM proteins and osteogenic genes. This initial transcriptomic analysis of postnatal heart valves at single cell resolution demonstrates that subpopulations of endothelial and immune cells are relatively constant throughout postnatal development, but interstitial cell subpopulations undergo changes in gene expression and cellular functions in primordial and mature valves. [less ▲]

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See detailValve Disease in Heart Failure: Secondary but Not Irrelevant.
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULiege; DULGHERU, Raluca Elena ULiege; MARCHETTA, Stella ULiege et al

in Heart Failure Clinics (2019), 15(2), 219-227

Secondary regurgitation caused by the remodeling and dysfunction of the left or right heart chamber may complicate heart failure, worsening both symptoms and prognosis. Outcome studies have shown that ... [more ▼]

Secondary regurgitation caused by the remodeling and dysfunction of the left or right heart chamber may complicate heart failure, worsening both symptoms and prognosis. Outcome studies have shown that patients' prognosis worsened as the severity of secondary regurgitation increases. Imaging and more specifically echocardiography plays a central role for diagnosis and serial assessment of secondary regurgitation as well as for timing the intervention and guiding the procedure. [less ▲]

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See detailP2X1 deficiency causes massive intestinal bleeding along with enhanced neutrophil-dependent thrombosis in colitis
Wéra, Odile ULiege; Servais, Laurence ULiege; Delierneux, Céline et al

Conference (2018, November)

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See detailOutcomes of Patients With Asymptomatic Aortic Stenosis Followed Up in Heart Valve Clinics.
Lancellotti, Patrizio ULiege; Magne, Julien; DULGHERU, Raluca Elena ULiege et al

in JAMA Cardiology (2018)

Importance: The natural history and the management of patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) have not been fully examined in the current era. Objective: To determine the clinical outcomes of ... [more ▼]

Importance: The natural history and the management of patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) have not been fully examined in the current era. Objective: To determine the clinical outcomes of patients with asymptomatic AS using data from the Heart Valve Clinic International Database. Design, Setting, and Participants: This registry was assembled by merging data from prospectively gathered institutional databases from 10 heart valve clinics in Europe, Canada, and the United States. Asymptomatic patients with an aortic valve area of 1.5 cm2 or less and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) greater than 50% at entry were considered for the present analysis. Data were collected from January 2001 to December 2014, and data were analyzed from January 2017 to July 2018. Main Outcomes and Measures: Natural history, need for aortic valve replacement (AVR), and survival of asymptomatic patients with moderate or severe AS at entry followed up in a heart valve clinic. Indications for AVR were based on current guideline recommendations. Results: Of the 1375 patients included in this analysis, 834 (60.7%) were male, and the mean (SD) age was 71 (13) years. A total of 861 patients (62.6%) had severe AS (aortic valve area less than 1.0 cm2). The mean (SD) overall survival during medical management (mean [SD] follow up, 27 [24] months) was 93% (1%), 86% (2%), and 75% (4%) at 2, 4, and 8 years, respectively. A total of 104 patients (7.6%) died under observation, including 57 patients (54.8%) from cardiovascular causes. The crude rate of sudden death was 0.65% over the duration of the study. A total of 542 patients (39.4%) underwent AVR, including 388 patients (71.6%) with severe AS at study entry and 154 (28.4%) with moderate AS at entry who progressed to severe AS. Those with severe AS at entry who underwent AVR did so at a mean (SD) of 14.4 (16.6) months and a median of 8.7 months. The mean (SD) 2-year and 4-year AVR-free survival rates for asymptomatic patients with severe AS at baseline were 54% (2%) and 32% (3%), respectively. In those undergoing AVR, the 30-day postprocedural mortality was 0.9%. In patients with severe AS at entry, peak aortic jet velocity (greater than 5 m/s) and LVEF (less than 60%) were associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality without AVR; these factors were also associated with postprocedural mortality in those patients with severe AS at baseline who underwent AVR (surgical AVR in 310 patients; transcatheter AVR in 78 patients). Conclusions and Relevance: In patients with asymptomatic AS followed up in heart valve centers, the risk of sudden death is low, and rates of overall survival are similar to those reported from previous series. Patients with severe AS at baseline and peak aortic jet velocity of 5.0 m/s or greater or LVEF less than 60% have increased risks of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality even after AVR. The potential benefit of early intervention should be considered in these high-risk patients. [less ▲]

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See detailNanoreservoirs
Oury, Cécile ULiege; Lancellotti, Patrizio ULiege; Jérôme, Christine ULiege et al

Patent (2018)

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See detailSoluble GPVI is elevated in injured patients: shedding is mediated by fibrin activation of GPVI
Montague, Samantha; Delierneux, Céline; LECUT, Christelle ULiege et al

in Blood (2018), 2(3), 240251

Soluble glycoprotein VI (sGPVI) is shed from the platelet surface and is a marker of platelet activation in thrombotic conditions. We assessed sGPVI levels together with patient and clinical parameters in ... [more ▼]

Soluble glycoprotein VI (sGPVI) is shed from the platelet surface and is a marker of platelet activation in thrombotic conditions. We assessed sGPVI levels together with patient and clinical parameters in acute and chronic inflammatory conditions, including patients with thermal injury and inflammatory bowel disease and patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) for elective cardiac surgery, trauma, acute brain injury, or prolonged ventilation. Plasma sGPVI was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and was elevated on day 14 after thermal injury, and was higher in patients who developed sepsis. sGPVI levels were associated with sepsis, and the value for predicting sepsis was increased in combination with platelet count and Abbreviated Burn Severity Index. sGPVI levels positively correlated with levels of D-dimer (a fibrin degradation product) in ICU patients and patients with thermal injury. sGPVI levels in ICU patients at admission were significantly associated with 28- and 90-day mortality independent of platelet count. sGPVI levels in patients with thermal injury were associated with 28-day mortality at days 1, 14, and 21 when adjusting for platelet count. In both cohorts, sGPVI associations with mortality were stronger than D-dimer levels. Mechanistically, release of GPVI was triggered by exposure of platelets to polymerized fibrin, but not by engagement of G protein-coupled receptors by thrombin, adenosine 5'-diphosphate, or thromboxane mimetics. Enhanced fibrin production in these patients may therefore contribute to the observed elevated sGPVI levels. sGPVI is an important platelet-specific marker for platelet activation that predicts sepsis progression and mortality in injured patients. [less ▲]

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See detailUne urgence bien souvent meconnue.
MARCHETTA, Stella ULiege; DULGHERU, Raluca Elena ULiege; Oury, Cécile ULiege et al

in Revue Medicale de Liege (2018), 73(5-6), 283-289

Infective endocarditis is a rare disease that can lead to some diagnostic wandering because of its often nonspecific and polymorphic clinical manifestations. This latency is at the origin of severe ... [more ▼]

Infective endocarditis is a rare disease that can lead to some diagnostic wandering because of its often nonspecific and polymorphic clinical manifestations. This latency is at the origin of severe cardiac and extra-cardiac complications, yet highly fatal. The clinician should always bear in mind the differential diagnosis of a patient with fever of undetermined origin, with risk factors for valve infection such as foreign material, and history recent invasive procedures (including dental procedures) or recent hospitalization. The current medical tools make it possible to highlight the infection and its complications in a fast and complete manner, so as not to delay the patient's management, particularly with the introduction of urgent empirical antibiotherapy. [less ▲]

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See detailAdvances in Pathophysiology of Calcific Aortic Valve Disease Propose Novel Molecular Therapeutic Targets
Hulin, Alexia ULiege; Hego, Alexandre; Lancellotti, Patrizio ULiege et al

in Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine (2018), 5

Calcific Aortic Valve Disease (CAVD) is the most common heart valve disease and its incidence is expected to rise with aging population. No medical treatment so far has shown slowing progression of CAVD ... [more ▼]

Calcific Aortic Valve Disease (CAVD) is the most common heart valve disease and its incidence is expected to rise with aging population. No medical treatment so far has shown slowing progression of CAVD progression. Surgery remains to this day the only way to treat it. Effective drug therapy can only be achieved through a better insight into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying CAVD. The cellular and molecular events leading to leaflets calcification are complex. Upon endothelium cell damage, oxidized LDLs trigger a proinflammatory response disrupting healthy cross-talk between valve endothelial and interstitial cells. Therefore, valve interstitial cells transform into osteoblasts and mineralize the leaflets. Studies have investigated signaling pathways driving and connecting lipid metabolism, inflammation and osteogenesis. This review draws a summary of the recent advances and discusses their exploitation as promising therapeutic targets to treat CAVD and reduce valve replacement. [less ▲]

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See detailEpicardial Adipose Tissue and Myocardial Fibrosis in Aortic Stenosis Relationship With Symptoms and Outcomes: A Study Using Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging.
Davin, Laurent; Nchimi, Alain; Ilardi, Federica et al

in JACC. Cardiovascular Imaging (2018)

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See detailAMPK-ACC signaling modulates platelet phospholipids and potentiates thrombus formation.
Lepropre, Sophie; Kautbally, Shakeel; Octave, Marie et al

in Blood (2018), 132(11), 1180-1192

AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) alpha1 is activated in platelets on thrombin or collagen stimulation, and as a consequence, phosphorylates and inhibits acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). Because ACC is ... [more ▼]

AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) alpha1 is activated in platelets on thrombin or collagen stimulation, and as a consequence, phosphorylates and inhibits acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). Because ACC is crucial for the synthesis of fatty acids, which are essential for platelet activation, we hypothesized that this enzyme plays a central regulatory role in platelet function. To investigate this, we used a double knock-in (DKI) mouse model in which the AMPK phosphorylation sites Ser79 on ACC1 and Ser212 on ACC2 were mutated to prevent AMPK signaling to ACC. Suppression of ACC phosphorylation promoted injury-induced arterial thrombosis in vivo and enhanced thrombus growth ex vivo on collagen-coated surfaces under flow. After collagen stimulation, loss of AMPK-ACC signaling was associated with amplified thromboxane generation and dense granule secretion. ACC DKI platelets had increased arachidonic acid-containing phosphatidylethanolamine plasmalogen lipids. In conclusion, AMPK-ACC signaling is coupled to the control of thrombosis by specifically modulating thromboxane and granule release in response to collagen. It appears to achieve this by increasing platelet phospholipid content required for the generation of arachidonic acid, a key mediator of platelet activation. [less ▲]

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See detailAtrial fibrillation in valvular heart diseases: Is there a role for DOACs ?
Oury, Cécile ULiege

Conference (2018)

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