References of "Nyssen, Anne-Sophie"
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See detailFatigue-related risk perception among emergency physicians working extended shifts.
Berastegui, Pierre ULiege; Jaspar, Mathieu ULiege; Ghuysen, Alexandre ULiege et al

E-print/Working paper (in press)

There is a growing body of studies indicating that extended shift duration has an adverse effect on fatigue, consequently leading to reduced work performance and higher risk of accident. Following modern ... [more ▼]

There is a growing body of studies indicating that extended shift duration has an adverse effect on fatigue, consequently leading to reduced work performance and higher risk of accident. Following modern fatigue risk management systems (FRMS), acceptable performance could be maintained by the mobilization of appropriate mitigation strategies. However, the effective deployment of such strategies assume that workers are able to assess their own level of fatigue-related impairments. In this study, we sought to determine whether emergency physicians’ subjective feelings of sleepiness could provide accurate knowledge of actual fatigue-related impairments while working extended shifts. We conducted a prospective observational study with a within-subjects repeated measures component. We collected sleep logs, sleepiness ratings and reaction times on a Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT) at different time points during shifts. Our results show that the PVT is sensitive to sleep loss and fatigue, with a 10% increase in mean reaction time across the shift. Subjective sleepiness, however, showed no significant association with time since awakening and was not a significant predictor of PVT performance. Our results are consistent with experimental studies showing that individuals tend to underestimate fatigue-related impairments when sleep deprived or functioning under adverse circadian phase. The discrepancy between subjective sleepiness and actual fatigue-related impairments may give workers the illusion of being in control and hinder the deployment of mitigation strategies. Further research is needed to determine the relative weight of circadian phase shifting and cumulative sleep deprivation in the decline of self-knowledge in extended shifts. [less ▲]

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See detailInformal fatigue-related risk management in the emergency department: a trade-off between doing well and feeling well?
Berastegui, Pierre ULiege; Jaspar, Mathieu ULiege; Ghuysen, Alexandre ULiege et al

E-print/Working paper (in press)

The effect of shift work on health and safety has long been a concern of public authorities, and increasingly stringent directives have been issued over the past decades. However, there are evidences that ... [more ▼]

The effect of shift work on health and safety has long been a concern of public authorities, and increasingly stringent directives have been issued over the past decades. However, there are evidences that current directives still represent a hazard in some work settings by disturbing the sleep/wake regulation processes. Emergency physicians are known to be particularly vulnerable to sleep deprivation due to inconsistent shift rotation, extended duty periods and overnight calls. However, naturalistic studies have actually failed to systematically demonstrate that sleep deprivation is associated with poorer work performance in emergency physicians. The inconsistency of these results could reside in physicians’ ability to compensate for fatigue-related impairments. Our aim is to identify informal fatigue management strategies used by emergency physicians and to assess the efficiency in terms of fatigue, work performance and associated risks for physician burnout. We conducted a prospective longitudinal study with 28 emergency physicians for a total of 182 shifts. At enrolment, participants answered the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Fatigue Management Survey. During shifts, we measured fatigue using the Psychomotor Vigilance Task and work performance using an adapted version of the Physician Achievement Review. Our results show that emergency physicians working at this public sector hospital use different types of compensatory strategies to manage fatigue-related risk, and that some of these strategies might result in a trade-off between work performance and occupational burnout. We propose further considerations for the implementation and follow-up of a fatigue risk management system in the emergency department. [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact of non-pharmacological approaches on the patient’s comfort after a cardiac surgery: A randomized controlled trial.
Rousseaux, Floriane ULiege; Puttaert, Ninon ULiege; LEDOUX, Didier ULiege et al

Conference (2019, May 30)

Different non-pharmacological techniques including hypnosis, music, and virtual reality (VR) are being used as complementary tools in the treatment of pain. A new technique which encompasses a combination ... [more ▼]

Different non-pharmacological techniques including hypnosis, music, and virtual reality (VR) are being used as complementary tools in the treatment of pain. A new technique which encompasses a combination of hypnosis and VR, called "virtual reality hypnosis" (VRH), should soon be used on a regular basis in clinical settings. The aim of this study is to better understand the impact of hypnosis, music, VR and VRH, and to investigate their influence on the patient’s perception of pain, anxiety and tiredness after a cardiac surgery in intensive care unit [less ▲]

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See detailStudy of the impact of non-pharmacological techniques (self-hypnosis/self-care) on cognitive complaints in cancer patients
Bicego, Aminata Yasmina ULiege; Grégoire, Charlotte; Cassol, Helena ULiege et al

Conference (2019, May 30)

Cancer diagnosis generates a number of physical, psychological and cognitive impairments such as memory, attentional and informational processing deficits that can undermine patients’ quality of life (QoL ... [more ▼]

Cancer diagnosis generates a number of physical, psychological and cognitive impairments such as memory, attentional and informational processing deficits that can undermine patients’ quality of life (QoL). Self-hypnosis combined to self-care learning have been used in the past years to treat these symptoms, at the moment of diagnosis, during and/or after the cancer treatments. However, the impact of self-hypnosis/self-care upon cognitive difficulties has not been investigated yet.The aim of this study is to better understand the impact of self hypnosis/self-care upon the cognitive functions by means of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Cognitive Function1 (FACT-COG). [less ▲]

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See detailHypnose et recherche : que se passe-t-il à Liège ?
Rousseaux, Floriane ULiege; FAYMONVILLE, Marie-Elisabeth ULiege; Nyssen, Anne-Sophie ULiege et al

in HEGEL: Penser par Soi-Même (2018), 8(3),

Depuis quelques années, il est de plus en plus clair que l’hypnose présente un champ de recherche fondamentale et appliquée important. L’Hôpital Universitaire (CHU) ainsi que l’Université de Liège font ... [more ▼]

Depuis quelques années, il est de plus en plus clair que l’hypnose présente un champ de recherche fondamentale et appliquée important. L’Hôpital Universitaire (CHU) ainsi que l’Université de Liège font partie des centres pionniers s’intéressant à l’étude de l’hypnose en tant qu’objet de recherche. Ces équipes ont pour objectif de comprendre les bases neurophysiologiques de la conscience humaine, les effets de la suggestion et les dimensions biopsychologiques qui en découlent pour pouvoir intégrer cet outil au mieux dans la pratique médicale à Liège. [less ▲]

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See detailFatigue‐related risk management in the emergency department: a focus‐group study
Berastegui, Pierre ULiege; Jaspar, Mathieu ULiege; GHUYSEN, Alexandre ULiege et al

in Internal and Emergency Medicine (2018)

Fatigue has major implications on both patient safety and healthcare practitioner’s well-being. Traditionally, two approaches can be used to reduce fatigue-related risk: reducing the likelihood of a ... [more ▼]

Fatigue has major implications on both patient safety and healthcare practitioner’s well-being. Traditionally, two approaches can be used to reduce fatigue-related risk: reducing the likelihood of a fatigued operator working (i.e. fatigue reduction), or reducing the likelihood that a fatigued operator will make an error (i.e. fatigue proofing). Recent progress mainly focussed on fatigue reduction strategies such as reducing work hours. Yet it has to be recognized that such approach has not wholly overcome the experience of fatigue. Our purpose is to investigate individual proofing and reduction strategies used by emergency physicians to manage fatigue-related risk. 25 emergency physicians were recruited for the study. Four focus groups were formed which consisted of an average of six individuals. Qualitative data were collected using a semi-structured discussion guide unfolding in two parts. First, the participants were asked to describe how on-the-job fatigue a ected their e ciency at work. A mind map was progressively drawn based upon the participants’ perceived effects of fatigue. Second, participants were asked to describe any strategies they personally used to cope with these effects. We used inductive qualitative content analysis to reveal content themes for both fatigue effects and strategies. Emergency physicians reported 28 fatigue effects, 12 reduction strategies and 21 proofing strategies. Content analysis yielded a further classification of proofing strategies into self-regulation, task re-allocation and error monitoring strategies. There is significant potential for the development of more formal processes based on physicians’ informal strategies. [less ▲]

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See detailPretreatment with P2Y12 inhibitors and outcome in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction treated by primary percutaneous coronary intervention
Gach, Olivier ULiege; Nyssen, Anne-Sophie ULiege; GAYETOT, Christiane ULiege et al

in Journal of Cardiovascular Medicine (2018), 19(5), 234-239

Aims Preload with clopidogrel, ticagrelor, or prasugrel in the setting of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) treated by primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is frequently ... [more ▼]

Aims Preload with clopidogrel, ticagrelor, or prasugrel in the setting of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) treated by primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is frequently applied. Limited data are available regarding the outcome impact of pretreatment with these drugs in the real world. Methods and results The outcome of 760 STEMI patients treated by primary PCI receiving clopidogrel, prasugrel, or ticagrelor (nU269, 327, 164, respectively) was evaluated. Patients in the clopidogrel group were older, whereas those in the ticagrelor group had less hypertension but were more active smokers. Angiographic characteristics were comparable among the three groups. At 1 month, more events were observed in the clopidogrel group (11.1%) than in the ticagrelor and prasugrel groups (7.1 vs. 5.1%, P=0.025), whereas the number of events in the ticagrelor and prasugrel groups did not differ. At 1 year, similar differences existed, mainly driven by a higher rate of death (19.5%, P=0.008) or stent thrombosis (2 vs. 1.3% for ticagrelor, P=0.132; vs. 0.3% for prasugrel, P=0.07) in the clopidogrel group. In-hospital and 1-year bleeding rates were similar between groups. Conclusion In real-world practice, pretreatment with prasugrel or ticagrelor in ongoing STEMI treated by primary PCI seems to be a well tolerated alternative strategy compared with clopidogrel but provides superior benefit in terms of outcomes. © 2018 Italian Federation of Cardiology. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of adverse events on anesthetists' health: A Belgian case study
Nyssen, Anne-Sophie ULiege; Lamy, Maurice ULiege; Blavier, Adelaïde ULiege

in Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica (2018), 68

Background and objectives: an increasing number of studies have illustrated the potential impact of medical errors and patient injuries on healthcare providers. This has led clinicians to be considered as ... [more ▼]

Background and objectives: an increasing number of studies have illustrated the potential impact of medical errors and patient injuries on healthcare providers. This has led clinicians to be considered as the “second victims” of patient harm. In this study, we explore the impact of adverse events on anesthetists’ physical and mental health using a reporting database from the University Hospital of Liège in Belgium. Methods: we collected information on the impact of adverse events on anesthetists’ health using data from an incident/accident reporting system and from accident analysis meetings. Results: feelings of anger, questioning, intrusive thoughts and feelings of guilt were the most frequently cited impacts on anesthetists’ health. Conclusions: Patient injuries can profoundly affect anesthetists’ health. Debriefing in a climate of trust and empathy seems to be primordial. [less ▲]

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See detailPsychological interventions influence patients' attitudes and beliefs about their chronic pain.
VANHAUDENHUYSE, Audrey ULiege; Gillet, Aline; MALAISE, Nicole ULiege et al

in Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine (2018)

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See detailDo Management and Executive Share the same Perception on the critical Issues Facing the Frontline Nursing Staff ?
Nyssen, Anne-Sophie ULiege; GILLET, Aline ULiege; Sougné, Jacques ULiege et al

in International Journal of Healthcare Management (2017)

Changes in managerial practices increasingly distance managers from staff by promoting rotation. It could be thought that this distance changes the perception managers have of work constraints and ... [more ▼]

Changes in managerial practices increasingly distance managers from staff by promoting rotation. It could be thought that this distance changes the perception managers have of work constraints and resources. This study attempts to tackle staff and leadership disparate views on the issues facing front-line nursing staff. We sent an online questionnaire on work constraints and good practices to nursing chiefs from Belgium hospitals and conducted focus groups with their ‘front-line’ nursing staff in order to compare perceptions. 40% of the chief nurses mentioned as a regular problems for their staff: production pressure, working time, doctors–nurses collaboration and managing new staff. Except for the ‘productive pressure’, these issues are rather considered by the staff as occasional problems. Front-line staffs evaluate infrastructure, heat, working positions as more common problems. However, statistical analyses showed one significant difference in perception: management of incidents/accidents. Health care organizations should promote participatory management tools both to diagnose work constraints and to elaborate action priorities in order to guarantee a shared understanding of decisions making between staff and supervisors. [less ▲]

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See detailEmergency Medical Services: When Fatigue Becomes The Norm.
Berastegui, Pierre ULiege; Jaspar, Mathieu ULiege; GHUYSEN, Alexandre ULiege et al

Conference (2017, June 27)

BACKROUND: Emergency Medical Services (EMS) routinely work at the very limit of their capacity due to growing emergency rooms visits and residents’ shortage. In this context, EMS workers are regularly ... [more ▼]

BACKROUND: Emergency Medical Services (EMS) routinely work at the very limit of their capacity due to growing emergency rooms visits and residents’ shortage. In this context, EMS workers are regularly asked to work more than 10 hours a day, on varying shifts and with short recuperation breaks. Two approaches can be used to reduce fatigue-related risk: reducing the likelihood a fatigued operator is working (i.e. fatigue reduction), or reducing the likelihood a fatigued operator will make an error (i.e. fatigue proofing). In Emergency Medical Services, formal risk control mainly focuses on reduction strategies such as reducing work hours while proofing strategies develops as an implicit element of the safety system. OBJECTIVE: Our purpose is to identify individual proofing and reduction strategies used by emergency residents and to investigate how they relate to fatigue, performance and patient safety indicators. METHODS: First, we conducted 4 focus-group sessions with a total of 25 EMS residents to elicit perceived consequences of fatigue and strategies used to cope with them. Focus group results were used to design a questionnaire assessing how often EMS residents personally used any of the strategies reported during sessions. Second, we administered the questionnaire to a larger sample and conducted a prospective observational study with a repeated within-subjects component. A total of 35 EMS residents participated in the study for a total of 200 shifts analyzed. We gathered sleep diaries, subjective sleepiness, reaction time, self-reported medical errors and performance ratings at different time point during both day and night shift using an android-based application. Sleep time and activity levels were confirmed using wrist actigraphy. DISCUSSION: We will discuss what can be drawn from our results in terms of individual and collective resilience processes with a focus on the potential for implementation of more formal processes at a system level.  [less ▲]

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See detailHow do we handle Computer-based technology? What is the cost/benefit ratio of technology for workers?
Zijlstra, Fred R.; Nyssen, Anne-Sophie ULiege

in Chmiel, Nik; Fraccaroli, Franco; Sverke, Magnus (Eds.) An Introduction to Work and organizational Psychology (2017)

This Chapter focuses on the question of how to deal with technology. Technology has changed our life’s, it has changed how we communicate with each other, and how we work, and also when and where we work ... [more ▼]

This Chapter focuses on the question of how to deal with technology. Technology has changed our life’s, it has changed how we communicate with each other, and how we work, and also when and where we work. It is important to understand how and why it has changed our life’s, and what kind of consequences this has. Technology may affect our (mental) health and well-being. In this chapter we present on overview of factors that need to be taken into account when designing technology. First a historic perspective is presented in order to understand the development of technology in the work context. Technology at work is generally believed to help us, but this is not always the case. Technology can make work also complex; it can also lead to health problems, in particular when wrong decisions are made whilst designing technology. A core issue is to what extent people are still in control of technology? This is the lead question to understand how individuals are affected by technology at work, and to know how technology should be handled. [less ▲]

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See detailIMPACT OF IMAGE BRIGHTNESS REDUCTION ON PERCEIVED QUALITY OF 3D EXPERIENCE FOR 3D CINEMA SPECTATORS
Loock, Severin; Grogna, David ULiege; Jaspar, Mathieu ULiege et al

in International Conference on 3D Imaging (IC3D) (2017)

3D movies are calibrated to meet a certain screen bright- ness standard. Therefore, what would be the consequences on the quality of the 3D experience for spectators watching a 3D movie when movie ... [more ▼]

3D movies are calibrated to meet a certain screen bright- ness standard. Therefore, what would be the consequences on the quality of the 3D experience for spectators watching a 3D movie when movie theaters do not respect this standard? First, we attempted to better understand which factors were important for a spectator by conducting an experiment where participants watched a 3D movie and filled out an exploratory questionnaire. Then, we aimed to investigate the link between image brightness loss and the quality of the 3D experience as perceived by the spectator. First results show no perceived difference in the quality of the 3D experience between a nor- mal brightness and a brightness decreased by 10% for four factors, i.e. (1) the appreciation of the movie, (2) the con- tent of the movie, (3) the 3D quality of the movie, and (4) the quality of the 3D experience in general. [less ▲]

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