References of "Niessen, Annie"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
See detailA History of the States’ Europeanness from the EEC/EU Institutions’ Perspective: (Re)considering the Current Relevance of the Institutional Interpretations in Light of the Recent Crises
Niessen, Annie ULiege

Conference (2019, May 10)

According to Article 49(1) of the Treaty on the European Union, any State wishing to apply for EU membership must be “European”, a preliminary eligibility condition which has been enshrined in EU law ... [more ▼]

According to Article 49(1) of the Treaty on the European Union, any State wishing to apply for EU membership must be “European”, a preliminary eligibility condition which has been enshrined in EU law since the Treaty of Rome. Yet, the qualifier “European” has never been explicitly or institutionally defined, despite the fact that it may take on various meanings, going broadly from geographical to cultural ones, including political ones. Failing a clear-cut definition, the EEC/EU institutions have been brought to provide their own interpretations of the requesting States’ European identity – or Europeanness – especially in the course of membership applications, treaty-making processes and enlargement prospects. Focusing on these specific phases, and especially on the membership requests that raised eligibility issues, this paper investigates the various interpretations of the States’ Europeanness that have been provided by the EEC/EU institutions over the last sixty years. The methodological approach relies on a textual and discursive analysis of both recent documents and older records. It then considers, or reconsiders, the current relevance of these interpretations in light of the recent crises that the EU has to handle, such as the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the EU or the democratic issues in some eastern Member States, and questions the prospective EU (dis)integration based on these institutional interpretations of European identity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (4 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailThe representations of Europe and European identity: political values and other eligibility conditions
Niessen, Annie ULiege

Scientific conference (2019, April 23)

Two-hour guest lecture given at the University of Amsterdam within the framework of Prof. Robin de Bruin's course "Democracy in the European Union". During the lecture, I first explained the eligibility ... [more ▼]

Two-hour guest lecture given at the University of Amsterdam within the framework of Prof. Robin de Bruin's course "Democracy in the European Union". During the lecture, I first explained the eligibility conditions to the European Union before focusing on the political condition. Then, I tackled the construction of the institutional discourse and europeanization, as well as their impact on the notions of Europe and European identity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (4 ULiège)
See detailThe EU Institutions’ Interpretations of the States’ Europeanness: Discourse and Relevance in Light of the Recent Internal Events
Niessen, Annie ULiege

Conference (2018, December 13)

According to Article 49 of the Treaty on the European Union, a state wishing to join the EU must be “European”. In other words, Europeanness is the first requirement for a state to be considered eligible ... [more ▼]

According to Article 49 of the Treaty on the European Union, a state wishing to join the EU must be “European”. In other words, Europeanness is the first requirement for a state to be considered eligible for EU membership. Although written into EU law since the Treaty of Rome (Article 237 §1), the qualifier “European” has never been explicitly or institutionally defined, despite the fact that it may encompass geographical, cultural, historical or else political references. Yet, the EEC/EU institutions have had to interpret the states’ Europeanness, especially in the course of enlargements and membership applications. Relying on a textual and discursive analysis of recent documents and older records held in the Historical Archives of the EU in Florence, this paper investigates and analyses the various institutional interpretations that have been provided by the EEC/EU institutions by focusing on specific (formal and informal) requests that raised eligibility issues. Building on these interpretations, it then discusses the guidelines that they can provide for enlargements, as well as the relevance of these interpretations that may be jeopardized by the recent internal events that the EU has to handle, such as Britain’s withdrawal from the EU or the democratic issues in some eastern countries. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (13 ULiège)
See detailThe Overseas Regions and the European Union: Historical Background, Rationale and Dynamics within the Scope of the Institutional Conception of European Identity
Niessen, Annie ULiege

Poster (2018, December 07)

European identity is the first condition for a State to be considered eligible to EU membership. Indeed, Article 49 of the Treaty on the European Union, which regulates the application process for EU ... [more ▼]

European identity is the first condition for a State to be considered eligible to EU membership. Indeed, Article 49 of the Treaty on the European Union, which regulates the application process for EU membership, enshrines that a State must be ‘European’, without specifying the meaning(s) attached to such a qualifier. Various interpretations were provided by the EU institutions in the course of enlargements and membership requests. One of these interpretations is illustrated by the integration, or full assimilation, of some overseas regions into the EU because they have retained ties with one of the EU Member States. Despite their remoted geographical position, these regions were indeed integrated – and not merely associated – in the same capacity as the metropolitan regions, which means that the general provisions of the Treaties apply to these overseas regions. In spite of the fact that this specific option has existed since the Treaty of Rome, different legal provisions for integration have applied to these regions, depending on their status within and ties with the motherland. This poster will provide an overview of the history of the integration of overseas regions into the EEC/EU, as well as the rationale and the dynamics (financial, geopolitical, ‘colonial’, …) behind this process, by relying on a few illustrative cases, such as the French overseas regions (Guadeloupe, Mayotte, Réunion …) and the former integrated Algeria and Greenland. The poster will also display the respective legal integration framework of these cases and the possibility to change their integration/association status enabled by Article 227 TFEU. By presenting the various aspects surrounding the relationship between the overseas regions and the European Union, the poster intends to highlight the historical (colonial) interpretation of European identity and how these regions have eventually become part of the institutional conception of European identity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (7 ULiège)
See detailGoverning Identity or How the EU Institutions Have Shaped the States’ Europeanness
Niessen, Annie ULiege

Scientific conference (2018, October 31)

Article 49 of the Treaty on the European Union prescribes that a State wishing to join the EU must be “European”. In other words, European identity, or Europeanness, is the first condition for a State to ... [more ▼]

Article 49 of the Treaty on the European Union prescribes that a State wishing to join the EU must be “European”. In other words, European identity, or Europeanness, is the first condition for a State to be considered eligible for EU membership. Enshrined in EU law since the Treaty of Rome (Article 237 §1), the qualifier “European” has never been explicitly or institutionally defined, despite the fact that it may encompass geographical, cultural, historical or else political references. Yet, the EEC/EU institutions have had to interpret the State’s Europeanness in the course of enlargements and membership applications. This research investigates these institutional interpretations by analyzing a few specific cases and by perusing documents produced by the institutions. It then explores the impact of these interpretations on the shaping of the States’ Europeanness through normative conditionality and political-cultural constructs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (11 ULiège)
See detailIn Search of the "European State": Findings, Methodological Approach and Challenges
Niessen, Annie ULiege

Scientific conference (2018, September 27)

Article 49 of the Treaty on the European Union prescribes that a state wishing to join the EU must be “European”. In other words European identity, or Europeanness is the first condition for a State to be ... [more ▼]

Article 49 of the Treaty on the European Union prescribes that a state wishing to join the EU must be “European”. In other words European identity, or Europeanness is the first condition for a State to be considered eligible for EU membership. Although written into EU law since the Treaty of Rome (Article 237 §1), the qualifier “European” has never been explicitly or institutionally defined, despite the fact that it may encompass geographical, cultural, historical or political references. Yet, the EEC/EU institutions have had to interpret the state’s Europeanness in the course of enlargements and membership applications. My doctoral research aims at investigating and analysing these interpretations in the institutional discourse by perusing recent documents as well as records held in the Historical Archives of the EU in Florence. Then, it will compare these interpretations with those provided within the Member States by political and media actors. During this meeting, I will first present the methodology used for the analysis of the institutional interpretations, and the findings of this analysis by illustrating the main interpretations with a few specific cases. I will then move to the nature of these interpretations and their impact on the idea of Europe(-anness). I will eventually tackle a few challenges that this research brings about. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (9 ULiège)
See detailB/ordering Europe: Normative Conditionality and Political-Cultural Constructs in the EU Institutions’ Interpretations of “Europe(-anness)”
Niessen, Annie ULiege

Conference (2018, July 24)

Since its inception, the European Union (EU) has pushed its borders by pursuing a European unification process. Within this framework, Article 49 of the Treaty on the European Union enshrines that any ... [more ▼]

Since its inception, the European Union (EU) has pushed its borders by pursuing a European unification process. Within this framework, Article 49 of the Treaty on the European Union enshrines that any State which is “European” can be eligible for membership of the EU. In other words, the State must belong to “Europe”, a fundamental condition that indirectly but legally sets a limit to EU expansion. Nonetheless, the concepts of “Europe” and “Europeanness” have never been officially defined by the EU institutions, which casts doubt on the maximum external borders that the EU could take on. Failing an official definition, the EU institutions have still provided both implicit and explicit interpretations of the term “European” in their institutional discourse, especially in the course of enlargements and treaty-making processes. Building on a content analysis of primary sources mainly kept in the Historical Archives of the EU at the European University Institute in Florence, the article investigates these interpretations and how they resulted in both the bordering and the ordering of Europe through normative conditions and politico-cultural constructs, as well as shaped an institutional conceptualization of “Europe(-anness)”. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (8 ULiège)
See detailQuestion d'européanité ou d'européanisation ? Les interprétations de l'identité européenne des Etats par les institutions de l'Union européenne : éléments définitoires et conditions d'éligibilité normatives
Niessen, Annie ULiege

Conference (2018, May 04)

L'identité européenne est indéniablement au cœur de l'intégration européenne. En effet, l'article 49 du Traité sur l'Union européenne stipule que tout Etat qui souhaite devenir membre de l'Union ... [more ▼]

L'identité européenne est indéniablement au cœur de l'intégration européenne. En effet, l'article 49 du Traité sur l'Union européenne stipule que tout Etat qui souhaite devenir membre de l'Union européenne doit être " européen ". En d'autres termes, l'identité européenne, ou l'européanité, d'un Etat et son appartenance à l'Europe conditionnent, en tout premier lieu, son éligibilité à l'Union européenne. Toutefois, les notions d'Europe et d'européanité n'ont jamais fait l'objet d'une définition explicite, consensuelle ou officielle, ce qui peut donner lieu à diverses interprétations. A défaut d'une telle définition, les institutions de l'Union européenne ont été amenées à fournir leurs propres interprétations et définitions, aussi bien explicites qu'implicites, du qualificatif " européen " au fur et à mesure du processus d'élargissement et des demandes d'adhésion. Sur la base d'une analyse de contenu de sources primaires principalement conservées aux Archives historiques de l'Union européenne à Florence, cet article explore les interprétations institutionnelles des notions d'Europe et d'européanité depuis les prémices de l'intégration européenne, ainsi que leur participation à la définition de ces notions et, in fine, à la construction de l'identité européenne des Etats à travers la mise en place de conditions d'éligibilité normatives. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 64 (7 ULiège)
See detailPoliticizing Europe: Normative Conditionality in the EU Institutions’ Interpretations of Europe(-anness)
Niessen, Annie ULiege

Conference (2017, December 12)

“Europe” and “Europeanness” have always been key notions in the construction process of the European Union (EU). Indeed, Article 49 of the Treaty on the European Union enshrines as primary condition that ... [more ▼]

“Europe” and “Europeanness” have always been key notions in the construction process of the European Union (EU). Indeed, Article 49 of the Treaty on the European Union enshrines as primary condition that a State must be “European” to be eligible for EU membership. However, there is neither a consensual nor an official definition of this term which can take on various meanings, broadly ranging from geographical to cultural ones. This polysemy has driven the EU institutions to provide their own interpretations, especially within the framework of enlargements and membership applications. Building on an analysis of institutional documents, the paper investigates how the notions of “Europe” and “Europeanness” have been interpreted since the inception of the EU and, in fine, politicized through the implementation of normative conditions. This analysis eventually led to a new, up-to-date model of the conditions that a State has to meet to be considered “European”, which further highlights the institutional conceptualization of Europe(-anness). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (27 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLe paradoxe anglais
Niessen, Annie ULiege

in Niessen, Annie; Michel, Quentin; Habran, Maxime (Eds.) Le labyrinthe européen - Eléments et principes de l’Union européenne (2016)

Since David Cameron’s announcement for a referendum on the United Kingdom’s continued membership of the European Union widely reinforced Britain’s reputation as a ‘eurosceptic’ and difficult Member State ... [more ▼]

Since David Cameron’s announcement for a referendum on the United Kingdom’s continued membership of the European Union widely reinforced Britain’s reputation as a ‘eurosceptic’ and difficult Member State. This Chapter explores the ‘English paradox’, i.e. the United Kingdom’s ever-present demands for EU reforms paired with a relative compliance when it came to the ratification of the successive European treaties. It first deals with the Cameron’s demands for reforms in order to fix the UK-EU relationship and avoid a withdrawal from the EU. It then looks back at the reforms which had already been put forward by the previous Prime Ministers during the negotiations related to the adoption of the European treaties. Finally, it explains the British internal procedure for the ratification of the European treaties and how the specific political system involves the English paradox. The conclusion puts into perspective the aforementioned elements and the United Kingdom’s ‘eurosceptic’ image. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 62 (24 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailBidding farewell? On the assessment of the structural or situational nature of the current crisis surrounding David Cameron's prospective referendum on Britain's continued membership of the European Union
Niessen, Annie ULiege

Master's dissertation (2015)

Since David Cameron’s announcement for an 'in/out' referendum, Britain’s membership of the European Union has been in jeopardy. This recent crisis in the UK-EEC/EU relationship is far from being the first ... [more ▼]

Since David Cameron’s announcement for an 'in/out' referendum, Britain’s membership of the European Union has been in jeopardy. This recent crisis in the UK-EEC/EU relationship is far from being the first one. Indeed, the UK has acquired the reputation of a difficult Member State since his accession in 1973. My dissertation explores this relationship throughout the different crises that occurred under the successive premierships in order to answer the following research question: is the current crisis surrounding Cameron’s ‘in/out’ referendum a structural or a situational phenomenon? To that end, the dissertation body is divided into three parts. Part 1 deals with the legal and practical possibilities of withdrawal from the EU. Part 2 is a journey through the past UK-EEC/EU relationship with a focus on the crises and the reforms demanded by the former Prime Ministers. Part 3 focuses on the current crisis, exploring Cameron’s demands for reforms and comparing them with three other party leaders’ demands before the 2015 general election. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 356 (120 ULiège)