References of "Ngomanda, Alfred"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA regional allometry for the Congo basin forests based on the largest ever destructive sampling
Fayolle, Adeline ULiege; Ngomanda, Alfred; Mbasi, Michel et al

in Forest Ecology and Management (2018), 430

The estimation and monitoring of the huge amount of carbon contained in tropical forests, and specifically in the above-ground biomass (AGB) of trees, is needed for the successful implementation of ... [more ▼]

The estimation and monitoring of the huge amount of carbon contained in tropical forests, and specifically in the above-ground biomass (AGB) of trees, is needed for the successful implementation of climate change mitigation strategies. Its accuracy depends on the availability of reliable allometric equations to convert forest inventory data into AGB estimates. In this study, we tested whether central African forests are really different from other tropical forests with respect to biomass allometry, and further examined the regional variation in tropical tree allometry across the Congo basin forests. Following the same standardized protocol, trees were destructively sampled for AGB in six sites representative of terra firme forests. We fitted regional and local allometric models, including tree diameter, wood specific gravity, tree height, and crown radius in the AGB predictors. We also evaluated the AGB predictions at the tree level across the six sites of our new models and of existing allometric models, including the pantropical equations developed by Chave et al. (2014, 2005) and the local equations developed by Ngomanda et al. (2014) in Gabon. With a total of 845 tropical trees belonging to 55 African species and covering a large range of diameters (up to 200 cm), the original data presented here can be considered as the largest ever destructive sampling for a tropical region. Regional allometric models were established and including tree height and crown radius had a small but significant effect on AGB predictions. In contrast to our expectations, tree height and crown radius did not explain much between-site variation. Examining the performance of general models (pantropical or regional) versus local models (site-specific), we found little advantage of using local equations. Earlier pantropical equations developed for moist forests were found to provide reasonable predictions of tree AGB in most sites, though the wettest sites, i.e., evergreen forests in Equatorial Guinea and, to a lesser extent in Gabon, tended to show a wet forest allometry. For the Congo basin forests, except in Equatorial Guinea where local models might be preferred, we recommend using our regional models, and otherwise the most recent pantropical models, that were validated here. These results constitute a critical step for the estimation and monitoring of biomass/carbon stocks contained in the second largest contiguous block of tropical forests worldwide, and the successful implementation of climate change mitigation strategies, such as REDD+. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 88 (8 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailClosing a gap in tropical forest biomass estimation : taking crown mass variation into account in pantropical allometries
Ploton, Pierre; Barbier, Nicolas; Takoudjou Momo, Stéphane et al

in Biogeosciences (2016), 13

Accurately monitoring tropical forest carbon stocks is a challenge that remains outstanding. Allometric models that consider tree diameter, height and wood density as predictors are currently used in most ... [more ▼]

Accurately monitoring tropical forest carbon stocks is a challenge that remains outstanding. Allometric models that consider tree diameter, height and wood density as predictors are currently used in most tropical forest carbon studies. In particular, a pantropical biomass model has been widely used for approximately a decade, and its most recent version will certainly constitute a reference model in the coming years. However, this reference model shows a systematic bias towards the largest trees. Because large trees are key drivers of forest carbon stocks and dynamics, understanding the origin and the consequences of this bias is of utmost concern. In this study, we compiled a unique tree mass data set of 673 trees destructively sampled in five tropical countries (101 trees > 100 cm in diameter) and an original data set of 130 forest plots (1 ha) from central Africa to quantify the prediction error of biomass allometric models at the individual and plot levels when explicitly taking crown mass variations into account or not doing so. We first showed that the proportion of crown to total tree aboveground biomass is highly variable among trees, ranging from 3 to 88 %. This proportion was constant on average for trees < 10Mg (mean of 34 %) but, above this threshold, increased sharply with tree mass and exceeded 50% on average for trees _45 Mg. This increase coincided with a progressive deviation between the pantropical biomass model estimations and actual tree mass. Taking a crown mass proxy into account in a newly developed model consistently removed the bias observed for large trees (> 1 Mg) and reduced the range of plot-level error (in %) from [-23; 16] to [0; 10]. The disproportionally higher allocation of large trees to crown mass may thus explain the bias observed recently in the reference pantropical model. This bias leads to far-from-negligible, but often overlooked, systematic errors at the plot level and may be easily corrected by taking a crown mass proxy for the largest trees in a stand into account, thus suggesting that the accuracy of forest carbon estimates can be significantly improved at a minimal cost. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (11 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailDid the savannah « flourished » 3000 years ago in the so-called Sangha River Interval of the Guineo-Congolian rainforest ? A retrospective study using stable isotopes and phytoliths
Bentaleb, Ilham; Freycon, Vincent; Gillet, Jean-François et al

Poster (2015, April)

We aim to improve our knowledge of the dynamic of the vegetation in Central Africa during the last 5 kyrs and to discuss the main hypothesis described in the literature - humans versus climatic impacts ... [more ▼]

We aim to improve our knowledge of the dynamic of the vegetation in Central Africa during the last 5 kyrs and to discuss the main hypothesis described in the literature - humans versus climatic impacts- both suggested as responsible of the Congo basin rainforest decline observed between 3 and 2.5 kyrs. We use the carbon isotopic composition of well-dated Central African soils to reconstruct the dynamic of the vegetation cover. We will discuss the carbon isotopic composition of the soil organic carbon methodology for reconstructing palaeovegetation in the light of Rayleigh distillation model. We showed that numerous sites exhibit a carbon isotopic ratios reflecting the Rayleigh distillation but few sites recorded real vegetation changes. Our study suggests that the vegetation of the Guineo-Congolian Region was disturbed between 3000 and 2000 BP (Before Present) without an extreme savannah expansion. We discussed the two hypotheses human versus climate impacts that may conduct to such new physiography of the vegetation. We suggest that the climate hypothesis is more likely than the human impact to explain the reduction of the Guineo-Congolian rainforest 3000 years ago. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 70 (4 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailImprove the characterization of tropical forests to improve management: policy brief
Gourlet-Fleury, Sylvie; Aleman, Julie; Bayol, Nicolas et al

Report (2014)

CoForChange has shown that management plans based on timber stock recovery are not enough to ensure the sustainability of these production forests. The variability of forest characteristics and their ... [more ▼]

CoForChange has shown that management plans based on timber stock recovery are not enough to ensure the sustainability of these production forests. The variability of forest characteristics and their different responses to disturbance should be considered in management decisions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 193 (15 ULiège)