References of "Mousis, O"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe 19 Feb. 2016 Outburst of Comet 67P/CG: An ESA Rosetta Multi-Instrument Study
Grün, E.; Agarwal, J.; Altobelli, N. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2016)

On 19 Feb. 2016 nine Rosetta instruments serendipitously observed an outburst of gas and dust from the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Among these instruments were cameras and spectrometers ... [more ▼]

On 19 Feb. 2016 nine Rosetta instruments serendipitously observed an outburst of gas and dust from the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Among these instruments were cameras and spectrometers ranging from UV over visible to microwave wavelengths, in-situ gas, dust and plasma instruments, and one dust collector. At 9:40 a dust cloud developed at the edge of an image in the shadowed region of the nucleus. Over the next two hours the instruments recorded a signature of the outburst that significantly exceeded the background. The enhancement ranged from 50% of the neutral gas density at Rosetta to factors >100 of the brightness of the coma near the nucleus. Dust related phenomena (dust counts or brightness due to illuminated dust) showed the strongest enhancements (factors >10). However, even the electron density at Rosetta increased by a factor 3 and consequently the spacecraft potential changed from ˜-16 V to -20 V during the outburst. A clear sequence of events was observed at the distance of Rosetta (34 km from the nucleus): within 15 minutes the Star Tracker camera detected fast particles (˜25 m s[SUP]-1[/SUP]) while 100 μm radius particles were detected by the GIADA dust instrument ˜1 hour later at a speed of ~6 m s[SUP]-1[/SUP]. The slowest were individual mm to cm sized grains observed by the OSIRIS cameras. Although the outburst originated just outside the FOV of the instruments, the source region and the magnitude of the outburst could be determined. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (7 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInstrumental methods for professional and amateur collaborations in planetary astronomy
Mousis, O.; Hueso, R.; Beaulieu, J.-P. et al

in Experimental Astronomy (2014), 38

Amateur contributions to professional publications have increased exponentially over the last decades in the field of planetary astronomy. Here we review the different domains of the field in which ... [more ▼]

Amateur contributions to professional publications have increased exponentially over the last decades in the field of planetary astronomy. Here we review the different domains of the field in which collaborations between professional and amateur astronomers are effective and regularly lead to scientific publications.We discuss the instruments, detectors, software and methodologies typically used by amateur astronomers to collect the scientific data in the different domains of interest. Amateur contributions to the monitoring of planets and interplanetary matter, characterization of asteroids and comets, as well as the determination of the physical properties of Kuiper Belt Objects and exoplanets are discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (11 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailMeasurements of the 14N/15N isotopic ratio in comets's ammonia
Rousselot, P.; Pirali, O.; Jehin, Emmanuel ULiege et al

Conference (2014, May)

La détermination des rapports isotopiques de l'azote dans les différents objets du système solaire est importante pour une bonne compréhension de leur origine. Les mesures du rapport 14N/15N faites jusqu ... [more ▼]

La détermination des rapports isotopiques de l'azote dans les différents objets du système solaire est importante pour une bonne compréhension de leur origine. Les mesures du rapport 14N/15N faites jusqu'à présent ont montré une grande dispersion des valeurs (de 50 à 441), tous les objets du système solaire excepté Jupiter apparaissant enrichis en 15N comparés à la nébuleuse protosolaire. Différentes explications ont été proposées pour expliquer les valeurs observées, qui sont complexes à interpréter car dues non seulement au réservoir d'origine de l'azote d'où provient l'objet étudié mais également à des mécanismes de fractionnement isotopique. Le cas des comètes, dans ce contexte, est intéressant, car leur composition est supposée relativement proche de celle de la nébuleuse protosolaire et la seule valeur disponible jusqu'à l'année dernière, avait été calculée à partir de la molécule HCN et du radical CN (issu du HCN). Ce rapport était d'environ 150, bien en dessous de la valeur mesurée dans l'atmosphère terrestre (272). Les comètes contiennent beaucoup d'azote sous forme de NH3, photodissocié en NH2 dont les raies sont nombreuses dans le spectre visible. Il était donc possible de mesurer le rapport 14N/15N dans l'ammoniac pour vérifier l'influence possible de phénomènes de fractionnement isotopique entre le HCN et le NH3, ceci à condition de connaître avec précision les longueurs d'onde des raies de 15NH2. Pour déterminer ces longueurs d'onde, nous avons mesuré le spectre d'émission de la transition Ã2A1~X2B1 de 14NH2 et 15NH2 dans la gamme spectrale 5700 Å – 6000 Å sur la ligne AILES du synchrotron SOLEIL, avec un spectromètre par transformée de Fourier. L'analyse de ces spectres a permis, au final, la détection du 15NH2 dans les spectres cométaires et la première détermination du rapport 14N/15N dans l'ammoniac des comètes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe science case for an orbital mission to Uranus: Exploring the origins and evolution of ice giant planets
Arridge, C. S.; Achilleos, N.; Agarwal, J. et al

in Planetary and Space Science (2014), (0), -

Abstract Giant planets helped to shape the conditions we see in the Solar System today and they account for more than 99% of the mass of the Sun's planetary system. They can be subdivided into the Ice ... [more ▼]

Abstract Giant planets helped to shape the conditions we see in the Solar System today and they account for more than 99% of the mass of the Sun's planetary system. They can be subdivided into the Ice Giants (Uranus and Neptune) and the Gas Giants (Jupiter and Saturn), which differ from each other in a number of fundamental ways. Uranus, in particular is the most challenging to our understanding of planetary formation and evolution, with its large obliquity, low self-luminosity, highly asymmetrical internal field, and puzzling internal structure. Uranus also has a rich planetary system consisting of a system of inner natural satellites and complex ring system, five major natural icy satellites, a system of irregular moons with varied dynamical histories, and a highly asymmetrical magnetosphere. Voyager 2 is the only spacecraft to have explored Uranus, with a flyby in 1986, and no mission is currently planned to this enigmatic system. However, a mission to the uranian system would open a new window on the origin and evolution of the Solar System and would provide crucial information on a wide variety of physicochemical processes in our Solar System. These have clear implications for understanding exoplanetary systems. In this paper we describe the science case for an orbital mission to Uranus with an atmospheric entry probe to sample the composition and atmospheric physics in Uranus’ atmosphere. The characteristics of such an orbiter and a strawman scientific payload are described and we discuss the technical challenges for such a mission. This paper is based on a white paper submitted to the European Space Agency's call for science themes for its large-class mission programme in 2013. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (3 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA Search for Water Vaporization on Ceres
Rousselot, P.; Jehin, Emmanuel ULiege; Manfroid, Jean ULiege et al

in Astronomical Journal (2011), 142

There are hints that the dwarf planet (1) Ceres may contain a large amount of water ice. Some models and previous observations suggest that ice could be close enough to the surface to create a flux of ... [more ▼]

There are hints that the dwarf planet (1) Ceres may contain a large amount of water ice. Some models and previous observations suggest that ice could be close enough to the surface to create a flux of water outward through the regolith. This work aims to confirm a previous detection of OH emission off the northern limb of Ceres with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE). Such emission would be evidence of water molecules escaping from the dwarf planet. We used the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph of the Very Large Telescope to obtain spectra off the northern and southern limbs of Ceres at several epochs. These spectra cover the 307-312 nm wavelength range corresponding to the OH (0,0) emission band, which is the brightest band of this radical, well known in the cometary spectra. These new observations, five times more sensitive than those from IUE, did not permit detection of OH around Ceres. We derive an upper limit for the water production of about ~7 × 10[SUP]25[/SUP] molecules s[SUP]-1[/SUP] and estimate the minimum thickness of the dust surface layer above the water ice layer (if present) to be about 20 m. . [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailA Search for Escaping Water from Ceres' Poles
Rousselot, P.; Mousis, O.; Dumas, C. et al

in Asteroids, Comets, Meteors 2008 (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (7 ULiège)