References of "Motte, Aurore"
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See detailSignes dans les textes, Continuités et ruptures des pratiques scribales en Égypte pharaonique, gréco-romaine et byzantine, Actes du colloque international de Liège (2-4 juin 2016)
Carlig, Nathan ULiege; Lescuyer, Guillaume ULiege; Motte, Aurore ULiege et al

Book published by PULg (in press)

This book contains seventeen papers of the international conference "Sign in Texts: Research on Continuities and Changes in Scribal Practices in Pharaonic, Graeco-Roman and Byzantine Egypt", organized at ... [more ▼]

This book contains seventeen papers of the international conference "Sign in Texts: Research on Continuities and Changes in Scribal Practices in Pharaonic, Graeco-Roman and Byzantine Egypt", organized at the University of Liège (2-4 June 2016) by the Liège-based Centre de Documentation de Papyrologie Littéraire (CEDOPAL) and the Egyptology Department. The conference brought into dialogue Egyptologists, classical philologists, papyrologists, demotics, as well as Arabic and Coptic scholars from Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, and the United Kingdom. This volume is a continuation of the proceedings recently published by G. Nocchi Macedo and M.C. Scappaticcio (Signs in Texts, Texts on Signs. Erudition, Reading and Writing in the Greco-Roman world, Liège, 2017, Papyrologica Leodiensia 6), which results itself from a conference held in September 2013 and devoted to the study of signs in Greek and Latin writings from the fourth century BC to the sixteenth century AD. The conference from which this book ensues aimed at studying the scribal practices of the Pharaonic, Greco-Roman, Byzantine and Arab periods (until the eleventh century BC) in the geographical framework of Egypt. It took into account both literary and documentary texts written on papyrus, parchment, ostraca, wood tablets, and stone. The studied languages were Ancient Egyptian (hieroglyphic and hieratic), Arabic, Demotic, Greek, Latin, and Coptic. The second aim of this conference was the identifications of continuities or breaks in the use of signs around the main text. For the very first time, the question of “signs” – defined sometimes as paratextuals, sometimes as diacritics – is discussed within this volume in an interdisciplinary and diachronic perspective. [less ▲]

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See detailAvant-propos
Motte, Aurore ULiege; Lescuyer, Guillaume ULiege; Carlig, Nathan ULiege et al

in Carlig, Nathan; Lescuyer, Guillaume; Motte, Aurore (Eds.) et al Signes dans les textes, Continuités et ruptures des pratiques scribales en Égypte pharaonique, gréco-romaine et byzantine, Actes du colloque international de Liège (2-4 juin 2016) (in press)

Présentation succincte des contributions du volume.

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See detailParatextual signs in the New Kingdom medico-magical texts
Motte, Aurore ULiege; Sojic, Nathalie ULiege

in Carlig, Nathan; Lescuyer, Guillaume; Motte, Aurore (Eds.) et al Signes dans les textes, Continuités et ruptures des pratiques scribales en Égypte pharaonique, gréco-romaine et byzantine, Actes du colloque international de Liège (2-4 juin 2016) (in press)

This paper’s aim is twofold. First, it describes the use of paratextual signs in the New Kingdom medico-magical corpus (c. 1570-1069 BCE) and secondly, it defines their functions, when applicable. The ... [more ▼]

This paper’s aim is twofold. First, it describes the use of paratextual signs in the New Kingdom medico-magical corpus (c. 1570-1069 BCE) and secondly, it defines their functions, when applicable. The focus lays on hieratic texts written on papyri and ostraca. The shape of the paper follows the internal, or chronological, logic of a text. After a few introductory comments (1-2), we address the layout (3), the copying process, including the structure and the emendations (4), and lastly, the signs put around the text, i.e. the peritext (5). We eventually show the richness of such a study on paratextual signs for a better understanding of scribal practices and textual traditions in Ancient Egyptian texts. [less ▲]

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See detailL'ostracon hiératique littéraire 3913 (OL 3913), une prière personnelle singulière sur le modèle d’une composition hymnique
Motte, Aurore ULiege

in Gasse, Annie; Albert, Florence (Eds.) CAHier II. Cahiers de la seconde Académie Hiératique (in press)

Primary edition of Ostracon Littéraire 3913 kept in the collection of the IFAO (Cairo)

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See detailL'ostracon hiératique littéraire 285 (OL 285), un témoin supplémentaire de l'hymne au soleil levant
Motte, Aurore ULiege

in Gasse, Annie; Albert, Florence (Eds.) CAHier II. Cahiers de la seconde Académie Hiératique (in press)

Primary edition of Ostracon Littéraire 285 kept in the collection of the IFAO (Cairo).

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See detailHow to give something as a present to the tomb owner in Old Kingdom daily-life scenes
Motte, Aurore ULiege

in Egyptian & Egyptological Documents, Archives, Libraries (in press), V

The aim of this paper is to describe the variety of ways by which the common workers speak to or offer something to the owner of a private tomb in the Old Kingdom daily-life scenes. Moreover, it retraces ... [more ▼]

The aim of this paper is to describe the variety of ways by which the common workers speak to or offer something to the owner of a private tomb in the Old Kingdom daily-life scenes. Moreover, it retraces the development of dedicatory formulas in Reden und Rufe from the 5th Dynasty to the end of the 6th Dynasty with a short overview of the subsequent speech captions. [less ▲]

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See detailObservations on the Reden und Rufe in the workmen’s tombs of Deir el-Medina
Motte, Aurore ULiege

in Polis, Stéphane; Dorn, Andréas (Eds.) Outside the box, selected papers from the conference "Deir el-Medina and the Theban Necropolis in Contact", Liège, 27–29 October 2014 (2018, October)

In this paper, I study the workers’ speeches (“Reden and Rufe”) in the 19th-Dynasty tombs of Deir el-Medina and its surroundings. For this period, only three tombs in Deir el-Medina (TT 212, TT 217, and ... [more ▼]

In this paper, I study the workers’ speeches (“Reden and Rufe”) in the 19th-Dynasty tombs of Deir el-Medina and its surroundings. For this period, only three tombs in Deir el-Medina (TT 212, TT 217, and TT 266) and one in the Theban necropolis (TT 16) preserve such texts. The goal of this paper is twofold. First, it aims at showing that, after falling into disuse in elite tombs, workers’ speeches appear in the tombs of craftsmen and the upper middle class, further evidence of the “democratisation” phenomenon during the 19th Dynasty. A wall relief fragment of the craftsman Meryptah from Saqqara (18th-19th Dynasty) indicates that this phenomenon was not restricted to the Theban area. The second goal of this paper is to determine what kind of language is used in 19th-Dynasty workers’ speeches, since this literary genre is sometimes thought to be written in the vernacular. I argue that it is a mimetic language, “à-la-manière-de,” more than an actual colloquial language. Regarding this question, the tombs of Ipuy (TT 217) and Amennakht (TT 266) lead to a dead-end because of their fragmentary state. The tomb of Ramose (TT 212) and the tomb of Panehsy and his wife Tarenu (TT 16), on the other hand, reveal Late Egyptian linguistic features. But, because their owners belong to a lower social class than the elite, it might suggest a reinterpretation of the rules specific to the literary genre of the workers’speeches (possible diastratic/diaphasic variation). [less ▲]

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See detailSpeaking as an Ancient Egyptian
Motte, Aurore ULiege

Conference (2018, June)

I here consider the speech captions (or ‘Reden und Rufe’) found in the so-called daily life scenes of Saite tombs in order to show to which extent they succeeded in imitating the phraseology and the état ... [more ▼]

I here consider the speech captions (or ‘Reden und Rufe’) found in the so-called daily life scenes of Saite tombs in order to show to which extent they succeeded in imitating the phraseology and the état-de-langue of the mastabas from the Old Kingdom. Four funerary monuments only are concerned by this literary genre, namely the tombs of Ankhefensekhmet (Saqqara), Ibi (Thebes), Montuemhat (Thebes), and an unknown owner (unknown provenance). I will first discuss the themes in which such speeches were included and enlarge the scope by considering how these themes were previously treated from the Old Kingdom to the New Kingdom. I will then show how the Saite ‘Reden und Rufe’ reused previous speech captions and that these tomb owners shared some interests that linked them to a common cultural network. This small but coherent corpus allows me to address issues of textual transmission during the Saite Period when the Ancient Egyptians wished to copy their ancestors. [less ▲]

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See detailReden und Rufe, a neglected genre? Towards a definition of the speech captions in private tombs
Motte, Aurore ULiege

in Bulletin de l'Institut Français d'Archéologie Orientale (2018), 117

This paper aims at shedding light on a rather neglected corpus, the so-called ‘Reden und Rufe’. In this regard, I focus on the question of their identity as a literary genre. In seeking to define the ... [more ▼]

This paper aims at shedding light on a rather neglected corpus, the so-called ‘Reden und Rufe’. In this regard, I focus on the question of their identity as a literary genre. In seeking to define the identity of a literary genre, I first consider the structuralist approach of G. Genette and its possible applications to Ancient Egyptian texts (sections 1-2). In a second step, I apply his three criteria (modes, themes, and forms) to a workable sample of Reden und Rufe, in Old and Middle Kingdom private tombs, after having discussed the previous studies on the subject and the corpus dynamicity (section 3). I eventually offer a characterization of the Reden und Rufe, which appear to be subject to adaptations, either insertion in new kinds of ‘daily-life’ scenes or inception of a new literary genre, the harpist songs. [less ▲]

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See detailFor your ka! How to give something as a present to the tomb owner?
Motte, Aurore ULiege

Conference (2017, July 04)

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See detailÉtudier un genre littéraire en Égypte Ancienne : approche(s) et méthode
Motte, Aurore ULiege

Conference (2017, February 16)

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See detailLe Projet Ramsès. Explorer la langue des pharaons au XXIe siècle
Motte, Aurore ULiege; Polis, Stéphane ULiege

Conference (2017, February 08)

En nous appuyant sur un historique de la chaire d’égyptologie à l’ULg (depuis sa création en 1902), nous montrons comment le Projet Ramsès est venu s’inscrire au cœur des projets de recherche du service ... [more ▼]

En nous appuyant sur un historique de la chaire d’égyptologie à l’ULg (depuis sa création en 1902), nous montrons comment le Projet Ramsès est venu s’inscrire au cœur des projets de recherche du service d’égyptologie à partir de 2006. La présentation s’attache ensuite à en présenter les derniers développements et à illustrer le caractère novateur de ce projet, tant du point de vue de l’égyptologie et de la linguistique de corpus, que du point de vue — plus large — des humanités numériques. Nous décrirons enfin le réseau de recherche européen dont il participe aujourd’hui, impliquant des collaborations suivies avec différents projets d’ampleur. [less ▲]

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See detailA (re)investigation of Middle Kingdom speech captions in wrestling scenes
Motte, Aurore ULiege

in Journal of Egyptian Archaeology (2017), 103(1), 53-70

This paper studies the Reden und Rufe present in Middle Kingdom wrestling scenes found in the tombs of Senbi (Meir), Neheri I (Deir el-Bersha), and Khety (Beni Hassan). Based on a systematic study, some ... [more ▼]

This paper studies the Reden und Rufe present in Middle Kingdom wrestling scenes found in the tombs of Senbi (Meir), Neheri I (Deir el-Bersha), and Khety (Beni Hassan). Based on a systematic study, some improvements are suggested to previous translations. After offering commentaries and translation(s) for each speech, the relationship between these scenes and those in Old Kingdom tombs is considered, and distinctive features highlighted. [less ▲]

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See detailReden und Rufe, are they kingly patterns? A first step towards an explanation about the origin(s) of speech captions in "daily life" scenes in private tombs
Motte, Aurore ULiege

in Rosati, Gloria; Guidotti, Maria Cristina (Eds.) Proceedings of the ICE XI, Florence, 23-30 August 2015 (2017)

Speech captions found in daily life scenes of private tombs, also named Reden und Rufe, are mostly known by the studies of Erman (1919), Montet (1925), and Guglielmi (1973). Yet, many questions have been ... [more ▼]

Speech captions found in daily life scenes of private tombs, also named Reden und Rufe, are mostly known by the studies of Erman (1919), Montet (1925), and Guglielmi (1973). Yet, many questions have been left unanswered: when, where, how did they appear? This paper aims at giving an overview of these issues. [less ▲]

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See detailParatextual signs in the medico-magical texts of the New Kingdom
Motte, Aurore ULiege; Sojic, Nathalie ULiege

Conference (2016, June 02)

This talk aims at describing the use of paratext in the medico-magical corpus of the New Kingdom (c. 1570-1069). The focus will be on hieratic texts written on papyri and ostraca. The first part will ... [more ▼]

This talk aims at describing the use of paratext in the medico-magical corpus of the New Kingdom (c. 1570-1069). The focus will be on hieratic texts written on papyri and ostraca. The first part will consist in typological considerations. From a formal point of view, paratextual notations will be grouped into three categories: (1) paratextual signs stricto sensu; (2) those that are not paratextual signs strictly speaking, as they are hieroglyphic signs, but that have to be understood as such; (3) the use of other visual means (red ink, size of the characters, blank spaces, …) to indicate that some elements are to be read as paratext. In the second part of the talk, we will define the functions (punctuation, emendation marks, layout marking, reading instructions, ...) and the uses of all these signs. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigations around an unrecognized genre: case study on speech captions in private tombs
Motte, Aurore ULiege

Conference (2016, May 05)

Since the Old Kingdom, speech captions, generally known as “Reden und Rufe”, are found in the decorative program of private tombs. These captions are dialogs between workers in the “daily life” scenes ... [more ▼]

Since the Old Kingdom, speech captions, generally known as “Reden und Rufe”, are found in the decorative program of private tombs. These captions are dialogs between workers in the “daily life” scenes. They appear in several topics, such as fishing, butchery, crafts, ... Quite surprisingly, they have never been studied exhaustively since their first mention in 1918 in Egyptological literature. My first goal is twofold: to show precisely where and when they are found, and what exactly defines “Reden und Rufe” as a genre. Besides, a chronological scope of nearly 2,300 years allows me to highlight diachronic, diatopic, and diastratic variations. It is particularly evident in New Kingdom and Late Period tombs, where “Égyptien de Tradition” features are found next to “vernacular” ones. It has long been taken for granted, incorrectly, that these speeches were written in an idiom very close to colloquial. This first comprehensive study aims to determine which state(s) of language is/are used. [less ▲]

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See detailSecond argument realization in Earlier Egyptian
Motte, Aurore ULiege; Winand, Jean ULiege

Conference (2016, February 18)

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See detail"Reden und Rufe": are they kingly patterns?
Motte, Aurore ULiege

Poster (2015, August 26)

Les discours des travailleurs, ou « Reden und Rufe », sont principalement connus grâce aux travaux d’Erman et Guglielmi [1]. Malgré quelques faiblesses, ceux-ci sont toujours les seuls ouvrages de ... [more ▼]

Les discours des travailleurs, ou « Reden und Rufe », sont principalement connus grâce aux travaux d’Erman et Guglielmi [1]. Malgré quelques faiblesses, ceux-ci sont toujours les seuls ouvrages de référence disponibles. Ce travail ambitionne de s’intéresser aux origines des discours des travailleurs. Quand, où, comment, pourquoi émergent-ils ? Autant de questions laissées jusqu’ici sans réponses. Après une brève remise en contexte des « Reden und Rufe », il sera montré que les discours des travailleurs sont une partie intégrante du « nouveau » programme décoratif royal, dont l’apothéose est atteinte sous Sahourê. Ce papier présentera également les premières réceptions de ces discours dans les tombes privées et leur évolution au sein de l’élite (mise en évidence de traditions phraséologiques, d’adaptation et d’innovation). Il sera montré que les discours des travailleurs s’inscrivent dans la tradition égyptienne de l’élite, qui reprend à son compte des motifs d’origine royale pour établir son propre programme décoratif. [1] A. ERMAN (1919), Reden, Rufe und Lieder auf Gräberbildern des Alten Reiches, Berlin (APAW philos.-hist. Kl., Abh. 15). W. GUGLIELMI (1973), Reden, Rufe und Lieder auf altägyptischen Darstellungen der Landwirtschaft, Viehzucht, des Fisch- und Vogelfangs vom Mittleren Reich bis zur Spätzeit, Bonn, Habelt (TÄB 1). [less ▲]

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