References of "Morin, Sophie"
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See detailLe plastique se met au vert
Morin, Sophie ULiege

Article for general public (2020)

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See detailTechnologies vertes
Morin, Sophie ULiege

Diverse speeche and writing (2020)

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See detailEffect of a low melting temperature mixture on the surface properties of lignocellulosic flax bast fibers
Morin, Sophie ULiege; Lecart, Brieuc ULiege; Istasse, Thibaut ULiege et al

in International Journal of Biological Macromolecules (2020)

Bast flax fibers were treated, with or without ultrasound assistance, using a low melting mixture (LMM) composed of lactic acid, d-glucose and water. This LMM treatment affected both lignin and ... [more ▼]

Bast flax fibers were treated, with or without ultrasound assistance, using a low melting mixture (LMM) composed of lactic acid, d-glucose and water. This LMM treatment affected both lignin and hemicelluloses contents and modified the fibers properties identified as crucial parameters in an industrial context, i.e. coloration, wettability, crystallinity, fibers diameter and chemical composition. Surface chemistry of the fibers were investigated through fluorescent tagged carbohydrates binding modules revealing macromolecular rearrangements responsible of both a fibers crystallinity enhancement and an unexpected hydrophobicity. It has been found that LMM treatments bleach fibers, which is considered a beneficial effect independent of the treatments. [less ▲]

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See detailDesigning natural fibres for biocomposites
Morin, Sophie ULiege; Richel, Aurore ULiege

Poster (2020, January 31)

Incorporating natural fibres in polymer matrices is challenging as both components tend to repel each other. Industrial fibres specifications focus on multiple fibres parameters including fibres aesthetic ... [more ▼]

Incorporating natural fibres in polymer matrices is challenging as both components tend to repel each other. Industrial fibres specifications focus on multiple fibres parameters including fibres aesthetic, composition, cost and safety. The fibre chemico-enzymatic engineering is explored to modify and improve the fibres properties. We have developped in our lab a new and innovative enzymatic process. Our results demonstrate that fibres dispersity in the polymer is enhanced, mechanical resistance and fibres coloration modified after our enzymatic treatment [less ▲]

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See detailFibres surface macromolecular rearrangement for biocomposites production
Morin, Sophie ULiege; Meddeb, Fatma; Beauregard, Marc et al

Poster (2019, November)

Plastics are today fulfilling structural and mechanical functions in cross-disciplinary domains. In a context of reducing the environmental issues, decreasing the amount of plastic is a global concern ... [more ▼]

Plastics are today fulfilling structural and mechanical functions in cross-disciplinary domains. In a context of reducing the environmental issues, decreasing the amount of plastic is a global concern. One solution to reduce the use of pure and unsustainable material is biocomposites. These materials are composed of natural fibres and polymer matrices, and possess hybrid properties of the initial components. These natural fibres are cellulose-rich which confer them a high mechanical resistance comparable to glass fibres which have been for years incorporated in composites at the industrial scale. Here, natural bast flax fibres were modified to modulate their properties. A treatment able to enhance the aesthetical and physico-chemical fibres properties was developed. The treatment lead to unexpected hydrophobic behaviour and an enhance crystallinity. Such results suggested that the fibres surface composition was modified. For industrial application, such as biocomposites, interfaces play a crucial role in the final material properties. Recombinant proteins were used to characterize the fibres surface. These fluorescent tagged proteins are detecting specifically polysaccharides such as cellulose, xylan and mannan. The amount of polysaccharides detected at the fibres surface clearly increased after the treatment. Noteworthy, this macromolecular modification of the fibres surface is correlated to the apparition of the unexpected fibres properties. Side beneficial effect are also detected after treatment and are completely independent to the variation of the fibres surface composition. [less ▲]

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See detailOne-step enzymatic grafting of ferulic acid with cellulose to enhance matrices–fibres compatibility in bio-composites
Morin, Sophie ULiege; Bockstal, Lauris ULiege; Jacquet, Nicolas ULiege et al

in Journal of Materials Science (2019)

Bio-composites elaboration is limited by poor interfaces between cellulose and polymer matrices and the cellulose degradation. Achieving cellulose grafting with ferulic acid should enhance those resulting ... [more ▼]

Bio-composites elaboration is limited by poor interfaces between cellulose and polymer matrices and the cellulose degradation. Achieving cellulose grafting with ferulic acid should enhance those resulting bio-composites mechanical properties. Therefore, a cellulose suspension was modified with ferulic acid using laccase under reaction conditions set at 60 °C, acetate buffer pH 5 for 24 h. Grafted cellulose fibrils were extruded in polypropylene-grafted maleic acid (PPgMA) for mechanical properties studies. Even if ferulic acid interacted with cellulose without any enzyme presence, the acid resilience was only detected for cellulose fibres modified with ferulic acid proving the surface grafting. Cellulose fibrillary lengths were unaffected by the enzymatic treatment suggesting a tiny coating. The resulting bio-composites had a Young modulus reduction of 12%. The elongation at maximal stress had 23% improvement, corresponding to a material mechanical resistance. This result was also confirmed by bio-composite elaboration with natural fibres under the same conditions. Ferulic acid and cellulose blends have improved the hardness properties of the resulting bio-composites with PP-PPgMA. [less ▲]

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See detailExtraction and refinement of agricultural plant fibers for composites manufacturing
Bousfield, Glenn; Morin, Sophie ULiege; Jacquet, Nicolas ULiege et al

in Comptes Rendus Chimie (2018), 21(9), 897-906

Because of their excellent tensile properties, low density, and natural abundance, cellulose-based plant fibers are a sustainable and biodegradable alternative for synthetic fibers in fiber-reinforced ... [more ▼]

Because of their excellent tensile properties, low density, and natural abundance, cellulose-based plant fibers are a sustainable and biodegradable alternative for synthetic fibers in fiber-reinforced composite materials. However, the extraction of plant fibers can be costly and difficult to control because the fibers are enmeshed in a complex network of biopolymers (principally lignin, pectin, and hemicellulose), which serve both to strengthen the fibers and to bind them to their parent organism. It is necessary to extract or degrade these biopolymers to produce fine plant fibers without adversely altering the fibers themselves in the process. In particular, it is important that both the molecular weight and the degree of crystallinity of the cellulose in the fibers be kept as high as possible. This article reviews chemical treatments, which have been used to extract and refine fibers both from purpose-grown fiber crops, such as hemp and flax, and agricultural waste such as coconut husks and pineapple leaves. The treatments are discussed in terms of changes in the mechanical properties and surface chemistry of the fibers. © 2018 Académie des sciences [less ▲]

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