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See detailVolatile Organic Compounds Emitted by Aspergillus flavus Strains Producing or Not Aflatoxin B1
Josselin, Laurie ULiege; De Clerck, Caroline ULiege; De Boever Marthe et al

in Toxins (2021)

Aspergillus flavus is a phytopathogenic fungus able to produce aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a carcinogenic mycotoxin that can contaminate several crops and food commodities. In A. flavus, two different kinds of ... [more ▼]

Aspergillus flavus is a phytopathogenic fungus able to produce aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a carcinogenic mycotoxin that can contaminate several crops and food commodities. In A. flavus, two different kinds of strains can co-exist: toxigenic and non-toxigenic strains. Microbial-derived volatile organic compounds (mVOCs) emitted by toxigenic and non-toxigenic strains of A. flavus were analyzed by solid phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in a time-lapse experiment after inoculation. Among the 84 mVOCs emitted, 44 were previously listed in the scientific literature as specific to A. flavus, namely alcohols (2-methylbutan1-ol, 3-methylbutan-1-ol, 2-methylpropan-1-ol), aldehydes (2-methylbutanal, 3-methylbutanal), hydrocarbons (toluene, styrene), furans (2,5-dimethylfuran), esters (ethyl 2-methylpropanoate, ethyl 2-methylbutyrate), and terpenes (epizonaren, trans-caryophyllene, valencene, α-copaene, β-himachalene, γ-cadinene, γ-muurolene, δ-cadinene). For the first time, other identified volatile compounds such as α-cadinol, cis-muurola-3,5-diene, α-isocomene, and β-selinene were identified as new mVOCs specific to the toxigenic A. flavus strain. Partial Least Square Analysis (PLSDA) showed a distinct pattern between mVOCs emitted by toxigenic and non-toxigenic A. flavus strains, mostly linked to the diversity of terpenes emitted by the toxigenic strains. In addition, the comparison between mVOCs of the toxigenic strain and its non-AFB1-producing mutant, coupled with a semiquantification of the mVOCs, revealed a relationship between emitted terpenes (β-chamigrene, αcorocalene) and AFB1 production. This study provides evidence for the first time of mVOCs being linked to the toxigenic character of A. flavus strains, as well as terpenes being able to be correlated to the production of AFB1 due to the study of the mutant. This study could lead to the development of new techniques for the early detection and identification of toxigenic fungi. [less ▲]

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See detailCan fungal volatile organic compounds be used to develop aflatoxin-specific sensors?
Josselin, Laurie ULiege; De Boevre, Marthe; De Clerck, Caroline ULiege et al

Poster (2020, January 31)

Foodstuff (corn, wheat, rice, etc.) can be contaminated by several filamentous fungal species in pre or post-harvest conditions. Some of these, such as Aspergillus, Fusarium and Penicillium produce ... [more ▼]

Foodstuff (corn, wheat, rice, etc.) can be contaminated by several filamentous fungal species in pre or post-harvest conditions. Some of these, such as Aspergillus, Fusarium and Penicillium produce secondary metabolites, highly toxic at low concentrations to all vertebrates including humans: they can cause severe illnesses upon chronic exposure and can even lead to death after acute exposure. These non-volatile molecules are named mycotoxins and current methods to detect them, involving the use of ELISA tests or HPLC, are quite time consuming and expensive. At present there is no rapid test that does not require extensive sample preparation to detect the presence of mycotoxin directly in a production line (e.g. grain storage companies). Therefore, the aim of this work is to identify volatile organic compounds (VOCs) markers, specific of mycotoxins’ production in foodstuff. Using the SPME technique, we have characterized and compared the VOCs produced in vitro by non-aflatoxigenic (not producing aflatoxins) and aflatoxigenic strains of Aspergillus flavus (producing aflatoxins B1, B2 and G2, three types of mycotoxins). Preliminary analyses have shown similarities and differences between the two strains. Both of them emit VOCs as 1-octen-3-ol, 3-methylbutan-1-ol, octan-3-one, 2-methylbutanal, 3-methylbutanal, known in the literature to be specific of fungi. In particular, we have identified several strain-specific terpenes that are of interest for the development of the future molecular foot-print sensor. The next step is to study the VOCs produced in in vivo conditions, when the fungi are growing on stored cereals; and the correlation between specific VOCs and mycotoxin production. [less ▲]

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See detailEtude de composés organiques volatils (COVs) émis lors de l'interaction hôte - pathogène par des souches produisant des mycotoxines.
Josselin, Laurie ULiege; De Boevre, Marthe; De Clerck, Caroline ULiege et al

Poster (2019, April 03)

Method for the qualitative detection (SPME) of VOCs emitted by toxigenic (mycotoxin-producing) and non-toxigenic (non mycotoxin-producing) strains.

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (8 ULiège)