References of "Monsieurs, Elise"
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See detailTowards a Transferable Antecedent Rainfall— Susceptibility Threshold Approach for Landsliding
Monsieurs, Elise ULiege; Dewitte, Olivier; Depicker, Arthur et al

in Water (2019)

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See detailA susceptibility-based rainfall threshold approach for landslide occurrence
Monsieurs, Elise ULiege; Dewitte, Olivier; Demoulin, Alain ULiege

in Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences (2019), 19

Rainfall threshold determination is a pressing issue in the landslide scientific community. While major improvements have been made towards more reproducible techniques for the identification of ... [more ▼]

Rainfall threshold determination is a pressing issue in the landslide scientific community. While major improvements have been made towards more reproducible techniques for the identification of triggering conditions for landsliding, the now well-established rainfall intensity or event-duration thresholds for landsliding suffer from several limitations. Here, we propose a new approach of the frequentist method for threshold definition based on satellite-derived antecedent rainfall estimates directly coupled with landslide susceptibility data. Adopting a bootstrap statistical technique for the identification of threshold uncertainties at different exceedance probability levels, it results in thresholds expressed as AR = (α±Δα)⋅S(β±Δβ), where AR is antecedent rainfall (mm), S is landslide susceptibility, α and β are scaling parameters, and Δα and Δβ are their uncertainties. The main improvements of this approach consist in (1) using spatially continuous satellite rainfall data, (2) giving equal weight to rainfall characteristics and ground susceptibility factors in the definition of spatially varying rainfall thresholds, (3) proposing an exponential antecedent rainfall function that involves past daily rainfall in the exponent to account for the different lasting effect of large versus small rainfall, (4) quantitatively exploiting the lower parts of the cloud of data points, most meaningful for threshold estimation, and (5) merging the uncertainty on landslide date with the fit uncertainty in a single error estimation. We apply our approach in the western branch of the East African Rift based on landslides that occurred between 2001 and 2018, satellite rainfall estimates from the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA 3B42 RT), and the continental-scale map of landslide susceptibility of Broeckx et al. (2018) and provide the first regional rainfall thresholds for landsliding in tropical Africa. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of remotely sensed rainfall products over Central Africa
Camberlin, Pierre; Barraud, Geoffrey; Bigot, Sylvain et al

in Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society (2019)

An intercomparison of seven gridded rainfall products incorporating satellite data (ARC, CHIRPS, CMORPH, PERSIANN, TAPEER, TARCAT, TMPA) is carried out over Central Africa, by evaluating them against ... [more ▼]

An intercomparison of seven gridded rainfall products incorporating satellite data (ARC, CHIRPS, CMORPH, PERSIANN, TAPEER, TARCAT, TMPA) is carried out over Central Africa, by evaluating them against three observed datasets: (a) the WaTFor database, consisting of 293 (monthly records) and 154 (daily records) rain-gauge stations collected from global datasets, national meteorological services and monitoring projects, (b) the WorldClim v2 gridded database, and (c) a set of stations expanded from the FAOCLIM network, these two latter sets describing climate normals. All products fairly well reproduce the mean rainfall regimes and the spatial patterns of mean annual rainfall, although with some discrepancies in the east–west gradient. A systematic positive bias is found in the CMORPH product. Despite its lower spatial resolution, TAPEER shows reasonable skills.When considering daily rainfall amounts, TMPA shows best skills, followed by CMORPH, but over the central part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, TARCAT is amongst the best products. Skills ranking is however different at the interannual time-scale, with CHIRPS and TMPAperforming best, though PERSIANN has comparable skills when only fully independent stations are used as reference. A preliminary study of Southern Hemisphere dry season variability, from the example of Kinshasa, shows that it is a difficult variable to capture with satellite-based rainfall products. Users should still be careful when using any product in the most data-sparse regions, especially for trend assessment. [less ▲]

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See detailSatellite-based rainfall thresholds for landsliding in Central Africa
Monsieurs, Elise ULiege; Kirschbaum, Dalia; Dille, Antoine et al

Conference (2019, March 27)

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See detailSalmonella Typhi From Blood Cultures in the Democratic Republic of the Congo: A 10-Year Surveillance
Tack, Bieke; Phoba, Marie-France; Van Puyvelde, Sandra et al

in Clinical Infectious Diseases (2019)

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See detailAdopting rainfall threshold analysis for landslides in Central Africa using satellite rainfall estimates
Monsieurs, Elise ULiege; Dewitte, Olivier; Kirschbaum, Dalia et al

Poster (2018, December 11)

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See detailEvaluating TMPA Rainfall over the Sparsely Gauged East African Rift
Monsieurs, Elise ULiege; Kirschbaum, Dalia; Tan, Jackson et al

in Journal of Hydrometeorology (2018), 19(9),

Accurate precipitation data are fundamental for understanding and mitigating the disastrous effects of many natural hazards in mountainous areas. Floods and landslides, in particular, are potentially ... [more ▼]

Accurate precipitation data are fundamental for understanding and mitigating the disastrous effects of many natural hazards in mountainous areas. Floods and landslides, in particular, are potentially deadly events that can be mitigated with advanced warning, but accurate forecasts require timely estimation of precipitation, which is problematic in regions such as tropical Africa with limited gauge measurements. Satellite rainfall estimates (SREs) are of great value in such areas, but rigorous validation is required to identify the uncertainties linked to SREs for hazard applications. This paper presents results of an unprecedented record of gauge data in the western branch of the East African Rift, with temporal resolutions ranging from 30 min to 24 h and records from 1998 to 2018. These data were used to validate the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) research version and near-real-time products for 3-hourly, daily, and monthly rainfall accumulations, over multiple spatial scales. Results indicate that there are at least two factors that led to the underestimation of TMPA at the regional level: complex topography and high rainfall intensities. The TMPA near-real-time product shows overall stronger rainfall underestimations but lower absolute errors and a better performance at higher rainfall intensities compared to the research version. We found area-averaged TMPA rainfall estimates relatively more suitable in order to move toward regional hazard assessment, compared to data from scarcely distributed gauges with limited representativeness in the context of high rainfall variability. [less ▲]

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See detailLandslide inventory for hazard assessment in a data- poor context: a regional-scale approach in a tropical African environment
Monsieurs, Elise ULiege; Jacobs, Liesbet; Michellier, Caroline et al

in Landslides (2018)

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See detailLandslide hazard assessment in an urgan-sprawling context: a geomorphological approach in Bukavu (DR Congo)
Dewitte, Olivier; Dille, Antoine; Delvaux, Damien et al

Conference (2018, May)

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See detailChallenges for developing strategies for natural hazard data collection in a poorly developed region with very low capacity: case study of the Kivu region in DR Congo
Imwangana, fils Makanzu; Dewitte, Olivier; Michellier, Caroline et al

Poster (2018, April)

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See detailLandslides, land use and the anthropization of a rural environment: focus on the Rift flanks west of Lake Kivu (DR Congo)
Maki Mateso, Jean-Claude; Monsieurs, Elise ULiege; Bielders, C et al

Poster (2018, April)

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See detailMulti-Temporal DInSAR to Characterise Landslide Ground Deformations in a Tropical Urban Environment: Focus on Bukavu (DR Congo)
Nobile, Adriano; Dille, Antoine; Monsieurs, Elise ULiege et al

in Remote Sensing (2018), 10(4), 626

Landslides can lead to high impacts in less developed countries, particularly in tropical environments where a combination of intense rainfall, active tectonics, steep topography, and high population ... [more ▼]

Landslides can lead to high impacts in less developed countries, particularly in tropical environments where a combination of intense rainfall, active tectonics, steep topography, and high population density can be found. However, the processes controlling landslide initiation and their evolution through time remains poorly understood. Here we show the relevance of the use of the multi-temporal differential radar interferometric (DInSAR) technique to characterise ground deformations associated with landslides in the rapidly-expanding city of Bukavu (DR Congo). We use 70 COSMO-SkyMed synthetic aperture radar images acquired between March 2015 and April 2016 with a mean revisiting time of eight days to produce ground deformation rate maps and displacement time series using the small baseline subset approach. We find that various landslide processes of different ages, mechanisms, and states of activity can be identified. Ground deformations revealed by DInSAR are found consistent with field observations and differential GPS measurements. Our analysis highlights the ability of DInSAR to grasp landslide deformation patterns affecting the complex tropical-urban environment of the city of Bukavu. However, longer time series will be needed to infer landside responses to climate, seismic, and anthropogenic drivers. [less ▲]

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See detailValidation of TRMM for hazard assessment in the remote context of tropical Africa
Monsieurs, Elise ULiege; Kirschbaum, Dalia; Jackson, Tan et al

in AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts (2017, December)

Accurate rainfall data is fundamental for understanding and mitigating the disastrous effects of many rainfall-triggered hazards, especially when one considers the challenges arising from climate change ... [more ▼]

Accurate rainfall data is fundamental for understanding and mitigating the disastrous effects of many rainfall-triggered hazards, especially when one considers the challenges arising from climate change and rainfall variability. In tropical Africa in particular, the sparse operational rainfall gauging network hampers the ability to understand these hazards. Satellite rainfall estimates (SRE) can therefore be of great value. Yet, rigorous validation is required to identify the uncertainties when using SRE for hazard applications. We evaluated the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) 3B42 Research Derived Daily Product from 1998 to 2017, at 0.25° x 0.25° spatial and 24 h temporal resolution. The validation was done over the western branch of the East African Rift, with the perspective of regional landslide hazard assessment in mind. Even though we collected an unprecedented dataset of 47 gauges with a minimum temporal resolution of 24 h, the sparse and heterogeneous temporal coverage in a region with high rainfall variability poses challenges for validation. In addition, the discrepancy between local-scale gauge data and spatially averaged (~775 km²) TMPA data in the context of local convective storms and orographic rainfall is a crucial source of uncertainty. We adopted a flexible framework for SRE validation that fosters explorative research in a remote context. Results show that TMPA performs reasonably well during the rainy seasons for rainfall intensities <20 mm/day. TMPA systematically underestimates rainfall, but most problematic is the decreasing probability of detection of high intensity rainfalls. We suggest that landslide hazard might be efficiently assessed if we take account of the systematic biases in TMPA data and determine rainfall thresholds modulated by controls on, and uncertainties of, TMPA revealed in this study. Moreover, it is found relevant in mapping regional-scale rainfall-triggered hazards that are in any case poorly covered by the sparse available gauges. We anticipate validation of TMPA’s successor (Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for Global Precipitation Measurement; ~10 km × ~10 km, half-hourly) using the proposed framework, as soon as this product will be available in early 2018 for the 1998-present period. [less ▲]

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See detailTropical Rainfall Measuring Mission validation in the western branch of the East African Rift: towards regional hazard assessment,
Monsieurs, Elise ULiege; Kirschbaum, Dalia; Maki Mateso, Jean-Claude et al

Scientific conference (2017, November)

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See detailLandslides in the Kivu Rift: distributions and triggering factors
Dewitte, Olivier; Dille, Antoine; Maki Mateso, Jean-Claude et al

Scientific conference (2017, November)

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (0 ULiège)