References of "Mitchell, D. G"
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See detailA radiation belt of energetic protons located between Saturn and its rings
Roussos, E.; Kollmann, P.; Krupp, N. et al

in Science (2018), 362

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See detailHeliospheric conditions at Saturn during Cassini's Ring-Grazing and Proximal Orbits
Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Paranicas, C. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2018), 45

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See detailReconnection acceleration in Saturn's dayside magnetodisc: a multicase study with Cassini
Guo, R. L.; Yao, Zhonghua ULiege; Sergis, N. et al

in Astrophysical Journal. Letters (2018)

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See detailPulsations of the polar cusp aurora at Saturn
Palmaerts, Benjamin ULiege; Radioti, Aikaterini ULiege; Roussos, E. et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2016), 121

The magnetospheric cusp is a region connecting the interplanetary environment to the ionosphere and enabling solar wind particles to reach the ionosphere. We report the detection of several isolated high ... [more ▼]

The magnetospheric cusp is a region connecting the interplanetary environment to the ionosphere and enabling solar wind particles to reach the ionosphere. We report the detection of several isolated high-latitude auroral emissions with the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph of the Cassini spacecraft. We suggest that these auroral spots, located in the dawn-to-noon sector and poleward of the main emission, are the ionospheric signatures of the magnetospheric cusp, in agreement with some previous observations with the Hubble Space Telescope. The high-latitude cusp auroral signature has been associated with high-latitude lobe reconnection in the presence of a southward interplanetary magnetic field. The occurrence rate of the polar cusp aurora suggests that lobe reconnection is frequent at Saturn. Several auroral imaging sequences reveal a quasiperiodic brightening of the polar cusp aurora with a period in the range of 60 to 70 min. Similar pulsations in the energetic electron fluxes and in the azimuthal component of the magnetic field are simultaneously observed by Cassini instruments, suggesting the presence of field-aligned currents. Pulsed dayside magnetopause reconnection is a likely common triggering process for the cusp auroral brightenings at Saturn and the quasiperiodic pulsations in the high-latitude energetic electron fluxes. [less ▲]

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See detailQuasi-periodic injections of relativistic electrons in Saturn's outer magnetosphere
Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Mitchell, D. G. et al

in Icarus (2016), 263

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See detailStatistical analysis and multi-instrument overview of the quasi-periodic 1-hour pulsations in the Saturn's outer magnetosphere
Palmaerts, Benjamin ULiege; Roussos, Elias; Krupp, Norbert et al

Conference (2015, June 05)

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See detailCassini nightside observations of the oscillatory motion of Saturn's northern auroral oval
Bunce, E. J.; Grodent, Denis ULiege; Jinks, S. L. et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2014), 119

recent years we have benefitted greatly from the first in-orbit multi-wavelength images of Saturn's polar atmosphere from the Cassini spacecraft. Specifically, images obtained from the Cassini UltraViolet ... [more ▼]

recent years we have benefitted greatly from the first in-orbit multi-wavelength images of Saturn's polar atmosphere from the Cassini spacecraft. Specifically, images obtained from the Cassini UltraViolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) provide an excellent view of the planet's auroral emissions, which in turn give an account of the large-scale magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and dynamics within the system. However, obtaining near-simultaneous views of the auroral regions with in situ measurements of magnetic field and plasma populations at high latitudes is more difficult to routinely achieve. Here we present an unusual case, during Revolution 99 in January 2009, where UVIS observes the entire northern UV auroral oval during a 2 h interval while Cassini traverses the magnetic flux tubes connecting to the auroral regions near 21 LT, sampling the related magnetic field, particle, and radio and plasma wave signatures. The motion of the auroral oval evident from the UVIS images requires a careful interpretation of the associated latitudinally "oscillating" magnetic field and auroral field-aligned current signatures, whereas previous interpretations have assumed a static current system. Concurrent observations of the auroral hiss (typically generated in regions of downward directed field-aligned current) support this revised interpretation of an oscillating current system. The nature of the motion of the auroral oval evident in the UVIS image sequence, and the simultaneous measured motion of the field-aligned currents (and related plasma boundary) in this interval, is shown to be related to the northern hemisphere magnetosphere oscillation phase. This is in agreement with previous observations of the auroral oval oscillatory motion. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamic auroral storms on Saturn as observed by the Hubble Space Telescope
Nichols, J. D.; Badman, S. V.; Baines, K. H. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2014), 41

We present observations of significant dynamics within two UV auroral storms observed on Saturn using the Hubble Space Telescope in April/May 2013. Specifically, we discuss bursts of auroral emission ... [more ▼]

We present observations of significant dynamics within two UV auroral storms observed on Saturn using the Hubble Space Telescope in April/May 2013. Specifically, we discuss bursts of auroral emission observed at the poleward boundary of a solar wind-induced auroral storm, propagating at ˜330% rigid corotation from near ˜01 h LT toward ˜08 h LT. We suggest that these are indicative of ongoing, bursty reconnection of lobe flux in the magnetotail, providing strong evidence that Saturn's auroral storms are caused by large-scale flux closure. We also discuss the later evolution of a similar storm and show that the emission maps to the trailing region of an energetic neutral atom enhancement. We thus identify the auroral form with the upward field-aligned continuity currents flowing into the associated partial ring current. [less ▲]

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See detailSignatures of magnetospheric injections in Saturn's aurora
Radioti, Aikaterini ULiege; Roussos, E.; Grodent, Denis ULiege et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2013)

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See detailUltraviolet Auroral Pulsations on Saturn from Cassini UVIS
Pryor, Wayne R.; Esposito, L. W.; Jouchoux, A. et al

in AAS/Division for Planetary Sciences Meeting Abstracts (2012, October 01)

Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observations of Saturn were obtained on 2009 days 278-280 with the UVIS long slit aligned east-west along the northern auroral oval. Bright quasi-periodic ... [more ▼]

Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) observations of Saturn were obtained on 2009 days 278-280 with the UVIS long slit aligned east-west along the northern auroral oval. Bright quasi-periodic localized bursts of UV emission were often observed with 1 hour spacing that slowly moved sub-corotationally along the main auroral arc. We will report on an apparent correlation of the bursts with the locations of Saturn's moons, and a search for other such examples. We will also compare the UVIS results with simultaneous Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) auroral images. [less ▲]

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See detailSaturn Auroral Movies from Cassini UVIS
Pryor, W. R.; Stewart, I.; Esposito, L. W. et al

in American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting 2009 (2009, December 01)

Cassini's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) continues to obtain Saturn auroral data. Two long slit spectral channels are used to obtain EUV data from 56.3-118.2 nm and FUV data from 111.5-191.3 nm ... [more ▼]

Cassini's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) continues to obtain Saturn auroral data. Two long slit spectral channels are used to obtain EUV data from 56.3-118.2 nm and FUV data from 111.5-191.3 nm. 64 spatial pixels along each slit are combined with slit motion to construct spectral images of Saturn. Auroral emissions are seen from electron-excited molecular and atomic hydrogen. In 2007-2009 UVIS obtained data with the spacecraft well out of Saturn's ring plane, permitting UVIS to obtain a number of short movies of the rotating auroral structures. Selected movies will be presented with geometric overlays and in polar projections. In some movies a cusp-like feature is present near noon inside the oval. One movie from 2008 day 201 shows parallel linear features on the day side almost at right angles to the main auroral oval that appear, then lengthen, separate in the middle, and then fade away. Other movies show similar cusp-related structures that resemble the letter "Q" where a dynamical feature at right angles to the oval moves away from the cusp region. The 2008 day 201 movie also shows one bright "polar flare" inside the oval with a spectrally distinct signature indicating the presence of higher energy electrons. A few of the most recent images were obtained at sufficiently close range that 2 spacecraft slews were needed to completely cover the oval. These images provide almost 100 pixels of information across the oval and clearly show multiple arcs of emission on the main oval and scattered emissions inside the oval. Several frames show emissions associated with the footprint of the Enceladus field line. We will discuss these features, their locations, and possible interpretations. [less ▲]

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See detailRecurrent energization of plasma in the midnight-to-dawn quadrant of Saturn's magnetosphere, and its relationship to auroral UV and radio emissions
Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Paranicas, C. et al

in Planetary and Space Science (2009), 57

We demonstrate that under some magnetospheric conditions protons and oxygen ions are accelerated once per Saturn magnetosphere rotation, at a preferred local time between midnight and dawn. Although ... [more ▼]

We demonstrate that under some magnetospheric conditions protons and oxygen ions are accelerated once per Saturn magnetosphere rotation, at a preferred local time between midnight and dawn. Although enhancements in energetic neutral atom (ENA) emission may in general occur at any local time and at any time in a Saturn rotation, those enhancements that exhibit a recurrence at a period very close to Saturn's rotation period usually recur in the same magnetospheric location. We suggest that these events result from current sheet acceleration in the 15-20 Rs range, probably associated with reconnection and plasmoid formation in Saturn's magnetotail. Simultaneous auroral observations by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (UVIS) suggest a close correlation between these dynamical magnetospheric events and dawn-side transient auroral brightenings. Likewise, many of the recurrent ENA enhancements coincide closely with bursts of Saturn kilometric radiation, again pointing to possible linkage with high latitude auroral processes. We argue that the rotating azimuthal asymmetry of the ring current pressure revealed in the ENA images creates an associated rotating field aligned current system linking to the ionosphere and driving the correlated auroral processes. [less ▲]

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See detailTransient auroral features at Saturn: Signatures of energetic particle injections in the magnetosphere
Radioti, Aikaterini ULiege; Grodent, Denis ULiege; Gérard, Jean-Claude ULiege et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2009), 114

We report for the first time transient isolated auroral spots at Saturn's southern polar region, based on Hubble Space Telescope (HST) FUV images. The spots last several minutes and appear distinct from ... [more ▼]

We report for the first time transient isolated auroral spots at Saturn's southern polar region, based on Hubble Space Telescope (HST) FUV images. The spots last several minutes and appear distinct from the rest of the auroral emissions. We study two sets of HST and Cassini observations during which Cassini instrumentation detected signatures of energetic particle injections close to the region where, on the same day, HST observed transient auroral spots. On the basis of the simultaneous remote and in situ observations, we discuss the possibility that the transient features are associated with the dynamical processes taking place in the Kronian magnetosphere. Given the limitations in the available observations, we suggest the following possible explanations for the transient aurora. The injection region could directly be coupled to Saturn's ionosphere by pitch angle diffusion and electron scattering by whistler waves, or by the electric current flowing along the boundary of the injected cloud. The energy contained in the injection region indicates that electron scattering could account for the transient aurora process. [less ▲]

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See detailSaturn's equinoctial auroras
Nichols, J. D.; Badman, S. V.; Bunce, E. J. et al

in Geophysical Research Letters (2009), 36

We present the first images of Saturn's conjugate equinoctial auroras, obtained in early 2009 using the Hubble Space Telescope. We show that the radius of the northern auroral oval is similar to 1.5 ... [more ▼]

We present the first images of Saturn's conjugate equinoctial auroras, obtained in early 2009 using the Hubble Space Telescope. We show that the radius of the northern auroral oval is similar to 1.5 degrees smaller than the southern, indicating that Saturn's polar ionospheric magnetic field, measured for the first time in the ionosphere, is similar to 17% larger in the north than the south. Despite this, the total emitted UV power is on average similar to 17% larger in the north than the south, suggesting that field-aligned currents (FACs) are responsible for the emission. Finally, we show that individual auroral features can exhibit distinct hemispheric asymmetries. These observations will provide important context for Cassini observations as Saturn moves from southern to northern summer. Citation: Nichols, J. D., et al. (2009), Saturn's equinoctial auroras, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L24102, doi: 10.1029/2009GL041491. [less ▲]

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See detailAuroral Processes
Kurth, W. S.; Bunce, E. J.; Clarke, J. T. et al

in Dougherty, M. K.; Esposito, L. W.; Krimigis, S. M. (Eds.) Saturn from Cassini-Huygens (2009)

Cassini has afforded a number of unique opportunities to understand auroral processes at Saturn and to highlight both differences and similarities with auroral physics at both Earth and Jupiter. A number ... [more ▼]

Cassini has afforded a number of unique opportunities to understand auroral processes at Saturn and to highlight both differences and similarities with auroral physics at both Earth and Jupiter. A number of campaigns were coordinated with the Hubble Space Telescope such that Cassini could provide either ground truth on the impinging solar wind or in situ measurements of magnetospheric conditions leading to qualitative and sometimes quantitative relationships between the solar wind influence on the intensity, the morphology and evolution of the auroras, and magnetospheric dynamics. The Hubble UV images are enhanced by Cassini’s own remote sensing of the auroras. Cassini’s in situ studies of the structure and dynamics of the magnetosphere discussed in other chapters of this book provide the context for understanding the primary drivers of Saturn’s auroras and the role of magnetospheric dynamics in their variations. Finally, Cassini’s three dimensional prime mission survey of the magnetosphere culminates in high inclination orbits placing it at relatively small radial distances while on auroral field lines, providing the first such in situ observations of auroral particles and fields at a planet other than Earth. The new observations have spawned a number of efforts to model the interaction of the solar wind with the magnetosphere and how such dynamics influence the auroras. [less ▲]

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See detailCoordinated measurements of auroral processes at Saturn from the Cassini spacecraft and HST
Mitchell, D. G.; Kurth, William; Hospodarsky, G. B. et al

Conference (2008, December 01)

One of the primary Cassini mission objectives at Saturn is to characterize Saturn's aurora-its spatial morphology, associated particle energization, radio wave generation, and magnetospheric currents ... [more ▼]

One of the primary Cassini mission objectives at Saturn is to characterize Saturn's aurora-its spatial morphology, associated particle energization, radio wave generation, and magnetospheric currents, relationship with solar wind pressure and magnetic field, and its large scale mapping to the magnetosphere. By design, the Cassini orbital tour included high inclination and low periapsis orbits late in the prime mission specifically to address many of these topics. In this presentation, we will provide a snapshot of the current state of our investigation into the relationship between magnetospheric measurements of particles and fields, and the aurora. For in situ data, we will show measurements of upward traveling light ion conics (~30 keV to 200 keV), often accompanied by electron beams (<20 keV to ~1 MeV) and enhanced broadband noise (10 Hz to a few kHz), throughout the outer magnetosphere on field lines that nominally map from well into the polar cap (dipole L > 50) to well into the closed field region (dipole L < 10). Sometimes the particle phenomena and the broadband noise occur in pulses of roughly five-minute duration, separated by tens of minutes. At other times they are relatively steady over an hour or more. Magnetic signatures associated with some of the pulsed events are consistent with field aligned current structures. Correlative observations of solar wind (Cassini) and aurora (HST) have established a strong relationship between solar wind pressure and auroral activity (brightness) (Crary et al., Nature, 2005; Clarke et al., JGR, 2008). A similar correspondence between bright auroral arcs and ring current ion acceleration will be shown here. So while some auroral forms seem to be associated with the open/closed field boundary (i.e. in the cusp-Bunce et al., JGR, 2008), we also demonstrate that under some magnetospheric conditions for which protons and oxygen ions are accelerated once per Saturn magnetosphere rotation at a preferred local time between midnight and dawn, simultaneous auroral observations by the HST reveal a close correlation between these dynamical magnetospheric events and dawn-side transient auroral brightenings. Likewise, many of the recurrent energetic neutral atom enhancements coincide closely with bursts of Saturn kilometric radiation, again suggesting a linkage with high latitude auroral processes. Finally, we will show some intriguing results of auroral movie sequences from the Cassini UVIS instrument with corresponding ring current movies from the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument Ion and Neutral Camera (MIMI/INCA). [less ▲]

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See detailSaturn's auroral morphology and activity during quiet magnetospheric conditions
Gérard, Jean-Claude ULiege; Grodent, Denis ULiege; Cowley, S. W. H. et al

in Journal of Geophysical Research. Space Physics (2006), 111

We report the results of a coordinated Hubble Space Telescope-Cassini campaign that took place between 26 October and 2 November 2005. During this period, Saturn's magnetosphere was in an expanded state ... [more ▼]

We report the results of a coordinated Hubble Space Telescope-Cassini campaign that took place between 26 October and 2 November 2005. During this period, Saturn's magnetosphere was in an expanded state and the solar wind was quiet, as indicated by the location of the magnetopause, in situ particle measurements, weak auroral SKR emission, and the generally low brightness of the aurora. We describe the morphology and dynamics of the aurora during this period in parallel with concurrent Cassini measurements. We show that the aurora exhibits considerable longitudinal structure and time variations over intervals of a few hours, in spite of the absence of observable external triggers and generally low intensity. In particular, enhancements of the dawn-morning oval are seen while no apparent indication of solar wind activity is observed. These features rotate at a speed corresponding to about 65% of the planet's angular velocity. We also describe energetic neutral atom measurements indicating that an ENA acceleration event occurred in the magnetotail on 26 October without any measured signature of solar wind activation. These observations suggest an intrinsically dynamical magnetosphere where injection of hot plasma occasionally takes place in the night or dawn sector during quiet magnetospheric conditions, possibly connected with either the Dungey or the Vasyliunas convection cycle. [less ▲]

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See detailSolar wind dynamic pressure and electric field as the main factors controlling Saturn's aurorae
Crary, Frank J.; Clarke, John T.; Dougherty, Michele K. et al

in Nature (2005), 433(7027), 720-722

The interaction of the solar wind with Earth's magnetosphere gives rise to the bright polar aurorae and to geomagnetic storms(1), but the relation between the solar wind and the dynamics of the outer ... [more ▼]

The interaction of the solar wind with Earth's magnetosphere gives rise to the bright polar aurorae and to geomagnetic storms(1), but the relation between the solar wind and the dynamics of the outer planets' magnetospheres is poorly understood. Jupiter's magnetospheric dynamics and aurorae are dominated by processes internal to the jovian system(2), whereas Saturn's magnetosphere has generally been considered to have both internal and solar-wind-driven processes. This hypothesis, however, is tentative because of limited simultaneous solar wind and magnetospheric measurements. Here we report solar wind measurements, immediately upstream of Saturn, over a one-month period. When combined with simultaneous ultraviolet imaging(3) we find that, unlike Jupiter, Saturn's aurorae respond strongly to solar wind conditions. But in contrast to Earth, the main controlling factor appears to be solar wind dynamic pressure and electric field, with the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field playing a much more limited role. Saturn's magnetosphere is, therefore, strongly driven by the solar wind, but the solar wind conditions that drive it differ from those that drive the Earth's magnetosphere. [less ▲]

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