References of "Martial, Charlotte"
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See detailNociception Coma Scale Revised allows to identify patients with preserved neural basis for pain experience
Bonin, Estelle ULiege; Lejeune, Nicolas ULiege; Thibaut, Aurore ULiege et al

in Journal of Pain (in press)

The Nociception Coma Scale-Revised (NCS-R) was developed to help assess pain in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). Several studies have shown its sensitivity in assessing response to acute ... [more ▼]

The Nociception Coma Scale-Revised (NCS-R) was developed to help assess pain in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). Several studies have shown its sensitivity in assessing response to acute noxious stimuli. However, they failed to determine a reliable cut-off score that could be used to infer pain processing in these patients. This retrospective cross-sectional study aimed to determine a NCS-R cut-off score supporting preserved neural basis for pain experience, based on brain metabolism preservation as measured by fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). We included patients in unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS) confirmed by the FDG-PET and examined the NCS-R total scores. As the highest score was 4, we defined the cut-off to be 5 and compared the brain metabolism of these patients to matched patients with DOC and a NCS-R cut-off score ≥ 5 (i.e., potential pain), as well as healthy subjects. We found a higher global cerebral metabolism in healthy subjects compared to both patient groups and also in patients with potential pain compared with FDG-PET confirmed UWS. We observed a preserved metabolism in the left insula in patients with potential pain compared with FDG-PET confirmed UWS. [less ▲]

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See detailLes expériences de mort imminente: Que nous apprennent les neurosciences?
Martial, Charlotte ULiege

Article for general public (in press)

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See detailFrom unconscious to conscious: a spectrum of states
Barra, Alice ULiege; Carrière, Manon ULiege; LAUREYS, Steven ULiege et al

in Overgaard, M; Mogensen, J; Kirkeby-Hinrup, A (Eds.) Beyond the Neural Correlates of Consciousness (in press)

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See detailLes expériences de mort imminente : que nous apprend la recherche empirique ?
Martial, Charlotte ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2020)

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See detailAn Echo of Consciousness: Brain Function During Preferred Music
Carrière, Manon ULiege; Larroque, Stephen ULiege; Martial, Charlotte ULiege et al

in Brain Connectivity (2020)

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See detailDe NDE als opkomend wetenschappelijk onderzoeksgebied
Martial, Charlotte ULiege; Cassol, Helena ULiege; LAUREYS, Steven ULiege

in Pim van Lommel (Ed.) Het geheim van Elysion: 45 jaar studie naar nabij-de-dood-ervaringen over bewustzijn in liefde zonder waarheen (2020)

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See detailNear-Death Experience Memories Include More Episodic Components Than Flashbulb Memories
Cassol, Helena ULiege; Bonin, Estelle ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege et al

in Frontiers in Psychology (2020), 11(888),

Memories of near-death experiences (NDEs) are recalled as “realer” than memories of other real or imagined events. Given their rich phenomenology, emotionality and consequentiality, it was hypothesized ... [more ▼]

Memories of near-death experiences (NDEs) are recalled as “realer” than memories of other real or imagined events. Given their rich phenomenology, emotionality and consequentiality, it was hypothesized that they could meet some aspects of the definition of flashbulb memories. We aimed to identify and compare the episodic and non-episodic information provided in verbal recollections of NDE, flashbulb, and control autobiographical memories. The phenomenological characteristics and centrality of the memories were also compared. Twenty-five participants who had lived a NDE in a life-threatening situation were interviewed and completed the Memory Characteristics Questionnaires as well as the Centrality of Event Scale for their NDE, a flashbulb and another autobiographical memory used as control. Overall, transcribed NDE verbal recollections included a higher overall amount of details and more internal/episodic information than control autobiographical and flashbulb memories. Moreover, flashbulb memories were associated to a lower intensity of feelings while remembering and a lower personal importance, and are less reactivated and less susceptible to be remembered from a first person perspective compared to NDE and control autobiographical memories. Finally, NDE memories are the most central memories to experiencers’ identity, followed by control autobiographical and then by flashbulb memories. These findings corroborate previous studies highlighting the impact and uniqueness of NDE memories. [less ▲]

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See detailMultimodal assessments of patients with disorders of consciousness
Martial, Charlotte ULiege

Scientific conference (2020, March 16)

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See detailCommunication and therapeutic interventions in patients with prolonged disorders of consciousness
Martial, Charlotte ULiege

Scientific conference (2020, March 16)

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See detailLes expériences de mort imminente: où en est la recherche?
Martial, Charlotte ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2020)

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See detailCharacterization of near-death experiences using text mining analyses: a preliminary study
Charland-Verville, Vanessa ULiege; Ribeiro de Paula, Demetrius; Martial, Charlotte ULiege et al

in PLoS ONE (2020)

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See detailNear-death experience as a probe to explore (disconnected) consciousness
Martial, Charlotte ULiege; Cassol, Helena ULiege; Laureys, Steven ULiege et al

in Trends in Cognitive Sciences (2020)

Forty-five years ago, the first evidence of near-death experience (NDE) during comatose state was provided, setting the stage for a new paradigm for studying the neural basis of consciousness in ... [more ▼]

Forty-five years ago, the first evidence of near-death experience (NDE) during comatose state was provided, setting the stage for a new paradigm for studying the neural basis of consciousness in unresponsive states. At present, the state of consciousness associated with NDEs remains an open question. In the common view, consciousness is said to disappear in a coma with the brain shutting down, but it is oversimplified. This article argues that the novel framework distinguishing awareness, wakefulness and connectedness is relevant to comprehend the phenomenon. Classical NDEs correspond to internal awareness experienced in unresponsive conditions, thereby corresponding to an episode of disconnected consciousness. Our proposal suggests new directions for NDE research, and more broadly, consciousness science. [less ▲]

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See detailExpériences de mort imminente: des états (in)conscients?
Martial, Charlotte ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2020)

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See detailBrain metabolism but not grey matter volume underlies the presence of language function in the minimally conscious state
Aubinet, Charlène ULiege; Cassol, Helena ULiege; Gosseries, Olivia ULiege et al

in Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair (2020), 34(2), 172-184

Background. The minimally conscious state (MCS) is subcategorized into MCS- and MCS+, depending on the absence or presence of high-level behavioral responses such as command following. Objective. We aim ... [more ▼]

Background. The minimally conscious state (MCS) is subcategorized into MCS- and MCS+, depending on the absence or presence of high-level behavioral responses such as command following. Objective. We aim to investigate the functional and structural neuroanatomy underlying the presence of these responses in MCS- and MCS+ patients. Methods. In this cross-sectional retrospective study, chronic MCS patients were diagnosed using repeated Coma Recovery Scale-Revised assessments. Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography data were acquired on 57 patients (16 MCS-; 41 MCS+) and magnetic resonance imaging with voxel-based morphometry analysis was performed on 66 patients (17 MCS-; 49 MCS+). Brain glucose metabolism and grey matter integrity were compared between patient groups and control groups. A metabolic functional connectivity analysis testing the hypothesis of preserved language network in MCS+ compared to MCS- was also done. Results. Patients in MCS+ presented higher metabolism mainly in the left middle temporal cortex, known to be important for semantic processing, compared to the MCS- group. The left angular gyrus was also functionally disconnected from the left prefrontal cortex in MCS- compared to MCS+. No significant differences were found in grey matter volume between patient groups. Conclusions. The clinical sub-categorization of MCS is supported by differences in brain metabolism but not in grey matter structure, suggesting that brain function in the language network is the main support for recovery of command-following, intelligible verbalization and/or intentional communication in the MCS. Better characterizing the neural correlates of residual cognitive abilities of MCS patients contributes to reduce their misdiagnosis and to adapt therapeutic approaches. [less ▲]

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See detailCan the Nociception Coma Scale-Revised be used in patients with a tracheostomy?
Lejeune, Nicolas ULiege; Thibaut, Aurore ULiege; Martens, Géraldine ULiege et al

in Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (2020)

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See detailBrain Metabolism but Not Gray Matter Volume Underlies the Presence of Language Function in the Minimally Conscious State (MCS): MCS+ Versus MCS− Neuroimaging Differences
Aubinet, Charlène ULiege; Cassol, Helena ULiege; Gosseries, Olivia ULiege et al

in Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair (2020), 34(2), 172-184

Background. The minimally conscious state (MCS) is subcategorized into MCS− and MCS+, depending on the absence or presence, respectively, of high-level behavioral responses such as command-following ... [more ▼]

Background. The minimally conscious state (MCS) is subcategorized into MCS− and MCS+, depending on the absence or presence, respectively, of high-level behavioral responses such as command-following. Objective. We aim to investigate the functional and structural neuroanatomy underlying the presence of these responses in MCS− and MCS+ patients. Methods. In this cross-sectional retrospective study, chronic MCS patients were diagnosed using repeated Coma Recovery Scale–Revised assessments. Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography data were acquired on 57 patients (16 MCS−; 41 MCS+) and magnetic resonance imaging with voxel-based morphometry analysis was performed on 66 patients (17 MCS−; 49 MCS+). Brain glucose metabolism and gray matter integrity were compared between patient groups and control groups. A metabolic functional connectivity analysis testing the hypothesis of preserved language network in MCS+ compared with MCS− was also done. Results. Patients in MCS+ presented higher metabolism mainly in the left middle temporal cortex, known to be important for semantic processing, compared with the MCS− group. The left angular gyrus was also functionally disconnected from the left prefrontal cortex in MCS− compared with MCS+ group. No significant differences were found in gray matter volume between patient groups. Conclusions. The clinical subcategorization of MCS is supported by differences in brain metabolism but not in gray matter structure, suggesting that brain function in the language network is the main support for recovery of command-following, intelligible verbalization and/or intentional communication in the MCS. Better characterizing the neural correlates of residual cognitive abilities of MCS patients contributes to reduce their misdiagnosis and to adapt therapeutic approaches. © The Author(s) 2020. [less ▲]

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See detailPostface
Martial, Charlotte ULiege

in Lallier, François (Ed.) Expériences de mort imminente : Peut-on vraiment parler de mort ? (2020)

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See detailPerturbations in dynamical models of whole-brain activity dissociate between the level and stability of consciousness
Sanz Perl; Pallavicini, Carla; Pérez Ipiña, Ignacio et al

E-print/Working paper (2020)

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See detailTime-Delay Latency of Resting-State Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Signal Related to the Level of Consciousness in Patients with Severe Consciousness Impairment.
Rudas, Jorge; Martinez, Darwin; Castellanos, Gabriel et al

in Brain Connectivity (2020), 10(2), 83-94

Recent evidence on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) suggests that healthy human brains have a temporal organization represented in a widely complex time-delay structure. This ... [more ▼]

Recent evidence on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) suggests that healthy human brains have a temporal organization represented in a widely complex time-delay structure. This structure seems to underlie brain communication flow, integration/propagation of brain activity, as well as information processing. Therefore, it is probably linked to the emergence of highly coordinated complex brain phenomena, such as consciousness. Nevertheless, possible changes in this structure during an altered state of consciousness remain poorly investigated. In this work, we hypothesized that due to a disruption in high-order functions and alterations of the brain communication flow, patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC) might exhibit changes in their time-delay structure of spontaneous brain activity. We explored this hypothesis by comparing the time-delay projections from fMRI resting-state data acquired in resting state from 48 patients with DOC and 27 healthy controls (HC) subjects. Results suggest that time-delay structure modifies for patients with DOC conditions when compared with HC. Specifically, the average value and the directionality of latency inside the midcingulate cortex (mCC) shift with the level of consciousness. In particular, positive values of latency inside the mCC relate to preserved states of consciousness, whereas negative values change proportionally with the level of consciousness in patients with DOC. These results suggest that the mCC may play a critical role as an integrator of brain activity in HC subjects, but this role vanishes in an altered state of consciousness. [less ▲]

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