References of "Majerus, Steve"
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See detailWorking memory treatment in aphasia: a theoretical and quantitative review.
Majerus, Steve ULiege

in Journal of Neurolinguistics (in press)

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See detailWorking memory for serial order and numerical cognition: What kind of association?
Majerus, Steve ULiege; Attout, Lucie ULiege

in Henik, Avishai; Fias, Wim (Eds.) Heterogeneity of Function in Numerical Cognition (in press)

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See detailA comparison of serial order short-term memory effects across verbal and musical domains
Gorin, Simon ULiege; Mengal, Pierre; Majerus, Steve ULiege

in Memory & Cognition (in press)

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See detailHow flexible is the use of egocentric versus allocentric frame of reference in the Williams syndrome population?
Heiz, Julie; Majerus, Steve ULiege; Barisnikov, Koviljka

in Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology (in press)

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See detailTemporal grouping effects in musical short-term memory
Gorin, Simon ULiege; Mengal, Pierre; Majerus, Steve ULiege

in Memory (in press)

Recent theoretical accounts of verbal and visuo-spatial short-term memory (STM) have proposed the existence of domain-general mechanisms for the maintenance of serial order information. These accounts are ... [more ▼]

Recent theoretical accounts of verbal and visuo-spatial short-term memory (STM) have proposed the existence of domain-general mechanisms for the maintenance of serial order information. These accounts are based on the observation of similar behavioural effects across several modalities, such as temporal grouping effects. Across two experiments, the present study aimed at extending these findings, by exploring a STM modality that has received little interest so far, STM for musical information. Given its inherent rhythmic, temporal and serial organisation, the musical domain is of interest for investigating serial order STM processes such as temporal grouping. In Experiment 1, the data did not allow to determine the presence or the absence of temporal grouping effects. In Experiment 2, we observed that temporal grouping of tone sequences during encoding improves short-term recognition for serially presented probe tones. Furthermore, the serial position curves included micro-primacy and micro-recency effects, which are the hallmark characteristic of temporal grouping. Our results suggest that the encoding of serial order information in musical STM may be supported by temporal positional coding mechanisms similar to those reported in the verbal domain. [less ▲]

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See detailVerbal short-term memory shows a specific association with receptive but not productive vocabulary measures in Down syndrome
Majerus, Steve ULiege; Barisnikov, Koviljka

in Journal of Intellectual Disability Research [=JIDR] (2018), 62

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See detailBehavioral assessment and diagnosis of disorder of consciousness
Schnakers, Caroline; Majerus, Steve ULiege

in Schnakers, Caroline; LAUREYS, Steven (Eds.) Coma and Disorders of Consciousness - 2nd edition (2018)

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See detailThe dorsal attention network reflects both encoding load and top-down control during working memory
Majerus, Steve ULiege; Péters, Frédéric; Bouffier, Marion ULiege et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2018), 30

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See detailQuestionnaire of Memory (Q-MEM): A new measure of everyday memory functioning in school-age children
Geurten, Marie ULiege; Majerus, Steve ULiege; Lejeune, Caroline et al

in Applied Neuropsychology: Child (2018), 7

We present a new measure of everyday memory, the Questionnaire of Memory (Q-MEM), which is specifically adapted for the ecological assessment of memory disorders in school-age children and constructed ... [more ▼]

We present a new measure of everyday memory, the Questionnaire of Memory (Q-MEM), which is specifically adapted for the ecological assessment of memory disorders in school-age children and constructed with four sections tapping effortful/intentional learning, automatic/procedural learning, prospective memory/organization, and working memory. Confirmatory Factor Analyses supported the Q-MEM’s four-factor structure in 700 five-to twelve-year-old children. The analyses also revealed a good internal reliability and a good test-retest fidelity. Finally, comparisons between Q-MEM profiles of children with learning disabilities and typically developing children revealed significant differences. Therefore, the Q-MEM is a promising measure for identifying memory problems in children. [less ▲]

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See detailSerial order working memory and numerical ordinal processing share common processes and predict arithmetic abilities
Attout, Lucie ULiege; Majerus, Steve ULiege

in British Journal of Developmental Psychology (2017)

Recent studies have demonstrated that both ordinal number processing and serial order working memory (WM) abilities predict calculation achievement. This raises the question of shared ordinal processes ... [more ▼]

Recent studies have demonstrated that both ordinal number processing and serial order working memory (WM) abilities predict calculation achievement. This raises the question of shared ordinal processes operating in both numerical and WM domains. We explored this question by assessing the interrelations between numerical ordinal, serial order WM, and arithmetic abilities in 102 7- to 9-year-old children. We replicated previous studies showing that ordinal numerical judgement and serial order WM predict arithmetic abilities. Furthermore, we showed that ordinal numerical judgement abilities predict arithmetic abilities after controlling for serial order WM abilities while the relationship between serial order WM and arithmetic abilities was mediated by numerical ordinal judgement performance. We discuss these results in the light of recent theoretical frameworks considering that numerical ordinal codes support the coding of order information in verbal WM. [less ▲]

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See detailLaterality patterns for Gestalts of language
Dumitru, Magdalena ULiege; Van Calster, Laurens ULiege; Bouffier, Marion ULiege et al

Poster (2017, September 07)

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See detailTypical versus delayed speech onset influences verbal reporting of autistic interests
Chiodo, Liliane ULiege; Majerus, Steve ULiege; Mottron, Laurent

in Molecular Autism (2017)

The distinction between autism and Asperger syndrome has been abandoned in the DSM-5. However, this clinical categorization largely overlaps with the presence or absence of a speech onset delay which is ... [more ▼]

The distinction between autism and Asperger syndrome has been abandoned in the DSM-5. However, this clinical categorization largely overlaps with the presence or absence of a speech onset delay which is associated with clinical, cognitive, and neural differences. It is unknown whether these different speech development pathways and associated cognitive differences are involved in the heterogeneity of the restricted interests that characterize autistic adults. [less ▲]

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See detailResting functional connectivity in minimally conscious state minus and plus
Aubinet, Charlène ULiege; Heine, Lizette ULiege; Martial, Charlotte ULiege et al

Poster (2017, June 27)

Patients in a minimally conscious state (MCS) have been subcategorized in MCS plus and MCS minus, that is, with or without command following capacity respectively. We aimed to characterize this residual ... [more ▼]

Patients in a minimally conscious state (MCS) have been subcategorized in MCS plus and MCS minus, that is, with or without command following capacity respectively. We aimed to characterize this residual capacity in both patient groups by means of resting state fMRI. We hypothesized a higher connectivity in MCS plus as compared with MCS minus in language-related networks, that is the left fronto-parietal network (FPN). Our sample includes 10 MCS plus and 9 MCS minus who match for age, gender, etiology and disease duration, as well as 35 healthy controls. We performed a seed-based resting state analysis using CONN toolbox2. We investigated the left FPN, and also the right FPN, the auditory network and the default mode network (DMN) in order to exclude the influence of perception of surrounding, auditory capacity, or internal thoughts. We employed a ROI-to-ROI analysis to investigate the inter-hemispheric connectivity and we investigated inter-group differences in grey and white matter volume by means of voxel-based morphometry (VBM). We observed a higher functional connectivity in controls than in patients, as well as in MCS plus as compared to MCS minus patients. Specifically, with DLPFC as seed, the left FPN was more connected in MCS plus patients to the left temporo-occipital fusiform cortex. No significant differences were found between both patient groups in the right FPN, the auditory network and the DMN, or using the ROI-to-ROI analyses and the VBM. Our results suggest that the clinical sub-categorization of MCS is sustained by functional connectivity differences in a language-related executive control network. MCS plus and MCS minus patients are not differentiated by networks involved in auditory processing, perception of surroundings and internal thoughts, nor by inter-hemispheric connectivity and morphology. [less ▲]

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See detailLa nature des intérêts spécifiques distingue les personnes avec et sans retard de langage.
Chiodo, Liliane ULiege; Majerus, Steve ULiege; Eusèbe, Sandrine et al

Poster (2017, May 20)

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See detailClinical sub-categorization of minimally conscious state according to resting functional connectivity
Aubinet, Charlène ULiege; Heine, Lizette ULiege; Martial, Charlotte ULiege et al

Conference (2017, March 31)

Introduction: Patients in a minimally conscious state (MCS) have been subcategorized in MCS plus and MCS minus, respectively with and without command following capacity. Here we aim to characterize ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Patients in a minimally conscious state (MCS) have been subcategorized in MCS plus and MCS minus, respectively with and without command following capacity. Here we aim to characterize differences in MCS plus as compared to MCS minus by means of functional connectivity (FC). Method: Resting state functional magnetic resonance imagery (fMRI) was acquired in 292 MCS patients and a seed-based analysis was conducted on a convenience sample of 19 MCS patients (10 MCS plus and 9 MCS minus) and 35 healthy controls. We investigated the left and right frontoparietal networks (FPN), the auditory network and the default mode network (DMN). We employed a ROI-to-ROI analysis to investigate the inter-hemispheric connectivity and we investigated inter-group differences in grey and white matter volume by means of voxel-based morphometry. Results: We found a higher FC in MCS plus as compared to MCS minus in the left FPN, specifically between the left dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex and the left temporo-occipital fusiform cortex (TOFC). The FC of auditory network, right FPN and DMN, inter-hemispheric connectivity and structure of grey and white matter did not show differences between patients groups. Discussion: Our results suggest that the clinical sub-categorization of MCS is sustained by FC differences in a language-related executive control network. MCS plus and MCS minus patients are not differentiated by networks involved in auditory processing, perception of surroundings and internal thoughts, nor by differences in inter-hemispheric connectivity and in morphology. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of minimally conscious state minus and plus according to resting functional connectivity
Aubinet, Charlène ULiege; Heine, Lizette; Martial, Charlotte ULiege et al

Scientific conference (2017, February 01)

The minimally conscious state (MCS) has been sub-categorized in MCS plus and MCS minus, i.e. respectively with and without command following capacity. Here we aimed at characterizing differences in MCS ... [more ▼]

The minimally conscious state (MCS) has been sub-categorized in MCS plus and MCS minus, i.e. respectively with and without command following capacity. Here we aimed at characterizing differences in MCS plus as compared to MCS minus by means of functional connectivity (FC). Resting state functional magnetic resonance imagery (fMRI) was acquired in 292 MCS patients and a seed-based analysis was conducted on a convenience sample of 19 MCS patients (10 MCS plus and 9 MCS minus) and 35 healthy controls. We investigated the left and right frontoparietal networks (FPN), the auditory network and the default mode network (DMN). We employed a ROI-to-ROI analysis and a voxel-based morphometry in order to investigate the inter-hemispheric connectivity and the grey and white matter volume, respectively. A significantly higher FC was found in MCS plus as compared to MCS minus in the left FPN, specifically between the left dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex and the left temporo-occipital fusiform cortex (TOFC). The FC of auditory network, right FPN and DMN, inter-hemispheric connectivity and structure of grey and white matter did not show differences between patients groups. The clinical sub-categorization of MCS is therefore sustained by FC differences in a language-related executive control network. These patient groups are not differentiated by networks involved in auditory processing, perception of surroundings and internal thoughts, nor by differences in inter-hemispheric connectivity and in morphology. [less ▲]

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See detailDyslexie et déficits de la mémoire à court terme / de travail : implications pour la remédiation
Majerus, Steve ULiege; Poncelet, Martine ULiege

in ANAE : Approche Neuropsychologique des Apprentissages chez l'Enfant (2017), 148

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See detailLe rôle de la mémoire de travail dans les apprentissages et leurs troubles
Majerus, Steve ULiege

in ANAE : Approche Neuropsychologique des Apprentissages chez l'Enfant (2017), 149

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See detailFluctuations of Attentional Networks and Default Mode Network during the Resting State Reflect Variations in Cognitive States: Evidence from a Novel Resting-state
Van Calster, Laurens ULiege; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULiege; SALMON, Eric ULiege et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2017)

Neuroimaging studies have revealed the recruitment of a range of neural networks during the resting state, which might reflect a variety of cognitive experiences and processes occurring in an individual's ... [more ▼]

Neuroimaging studies have revealed the recruitment of a range of neural networks during the resting state, which might reflect a variety of cognitive experiences and processes occurring in an individual's mind. In this study, we focused on the default mode network (DMN) and attentional networks and investigated their association with distinct mental states when participants are not performing an explicit task. To investigate the range of possible cognitive experiences more directly, this study proposes a novel method of resting-state fMRI experience sampling, informed by a phenomenological investigation of the fluctuation of mental states during the resting state. We hypothesized that DMN activity would increase as a function of internal mentation and that the activity of dorsal and ventral networks would indicate states of top–down versus bottom–up attention at rest. Results showed that dorsal attention network activity fluctuated as a function of subjective reports of attentional control, providing evidence that activity of this network reflects the perceived recruitment of controlled attentional processes during spontaneous cognition. Activity of the DMN increased when participants reported to be in a subjective state of internal mentation, but not when they reported to be in a state of perception. This study provides direct evidence for a link between fluctuations of resting-state neural activity and fluctuations in specific cognitive processes. [less ▲]

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