References of "MAERTENS DE NOORDHOUT, Alain"
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See detailCorrelation between deep brain stimulation effects on freezing of gait and audio-spinal reflex
Parmentier, Eric ULiege; De Pasqua, Victor; D'Ostilio, Kévin et al

in Clinical Neurophysiology (2018), 129

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See detailEvidence of an increased neuronal activation-to-resting glucose uptake ratio in the visual cortex of migraine patients: a study comparing 18FDG-PET and visual evoked potentials
Lisicki Martinez, Marco ULiege; D'Ostilio, Kevin; Coppola, Gianluca et al

in Journal of Headache and Pain (2018)

Background: Migraine attacks might be triggered by a disruption of cerebral homeostasis. During the interictal period migraine patients are characterized by abnormal sensory information processing, but ... [more ▼]

Background: Migraine attacks might be triggered by a disruption of cerebral homeostasis. During the interictal period migraine patients are characterized by abnormal sensory information processing, but this functional abnormality may not be sufficient to disrupt the physiological equilibrium of the cortex unless it is accompanied by additional pathological mechanisms, like a reduction in energetic reserves. The aim of this study was to compare resting cerebral glucose uptake (using positron emission tomography (18fluorodeoxyglucose-PET)), and visual cortex activation (using visual evoked potentials (VEP)), between episodic migraine without aura patients in the interictal period and healthy volunteers. Methods: Twenty episodic migraine without aura patients and twenty healthy volunteers were studied. 18FDG-PET and VEP recordings were performed on separate days. The overall glucose uptake in the visual cortex-to-VEP response ratio was calculated and compared between the groups. Additionally, PET scan comparisons adding area under the VEP curve as a covariate were performed. For case-wise analysis, eigenvalues from a specific region exhibiting significantly different FDG-PET signal in the visual cortex were extracted. Standardized glucose uptake values from this region and VEP values from each subject were then coupled and compared between the groups. Results: The mean area under the curve of VEP was greater in migraine patients compared to healthy controls. In the same line, patients had an increased neuronal activation-to-resting glucose uptake ratio in the visual cortex. Statistical parametric mapping analysis revealed that cortical FDG-PET signal in relation to VEP area under the curve was significantly reduced in migraineurs in a cluster extending throughout the left visual cortex, from Brodmann’s areas 19 and 18 to area 7. Within this region, case-wise analyses showed that a visual neuronal activation exceeding glucose uptake was present in 90% of migraine patients, but in only 15% of healthy volunteers. Conclusion: This study identifies an area of increased neuronal activation-to-resting glucose uptake ratio in the visual cortex of migraine patients between attacks. Such observation supports the concept that an activity-induced rupture of cerebral metabolic homeostasis may be a cornerstone of migraine pathophysiology. This article has been selected as the winner of the 2018 Enrico Greppi Award. The Enrico Greppi Award is made to an unpublished paper dealing with clinical, epidemiological, genetic, pathophysiological or therapeutic aspects of headache. Italian Society for the Study of Headaches (SISC) sponsors this award, and the award is supported through an educational grant from Teva Neuroscience. This article did not undergo the standard peer review process for The Journal of Headache and Pain. The members of the 2018 Enrico Greppi Award Selection Committee were: Francesco Pierelli, Paolo Martelletti, Lyn Griffiths, Simona Sacco, Andreas Straube and Cenk Ayata. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain correlates of single trial visual evoked potentials in migraine: more than meets the eye.
Lisicki Martinez, Marco ULiege; D’Ostilio, Kevin; Coppola, Gianluca et al

in Frontiers in Neurology (2018)

Background: Using conventional visual evoked potentials (VEPs), migraine patients were found to be hyperresponsive to visual stimulus. Considering that a significant portion of neuronal activity is lost ... [more ▼]

Background: Using conventional visual evoked potentials (VEPs), migraine patients were found to be hyperresponsive to visual stimulus. Considering that a significant portion of neuronal activity is lost for analysis in the averaging process of conventional VEPs, in this study we investigated visual evoked responses of migraine patients and healthy volunteers using a different approach: single trial analysis. This method permits to preserve all stimulus-induced neuronal activations, whether they are synchronized or not. In addition, we used MRI voxel-based morphometry to search for cortical regions where gray matter volume correlated with single trial (st) VEP amplitude. Finally, using resting-state functional MRI, we explored the connectivity between these regions. Results: stVEP amplitude was greater in episodic migraine patients than in healthy volunteers. Moreover, in migraine patients it correlated positively with gray matter volume of several brain areas likely involved in visual processing, mostly belonging to the ventral attention network. Finally, resting state functional connectivity corroborated the existence of functional interactions between these areas and helped delineating their directions. Conclusions: st-VEPs appear to be a reliable measure of cerebral responsiveness to visual stimuli. Mean st-VEP amplitude is higher in episodic migraine patients compared to controls. Visual hyper-responsiveness in migraine involves several functionally-interconnected brain regions, suggesting that it is the result of a complex multi-regional process coupled to stimulus driven attention systems rather than a localized alteration. [less ▲]

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See detailIncreased functional connectivity between the right temporo-parietal junction and the temporal poles in migraine without aura
Lisicki Martinez, Marco ULiege; D'Ostilio, Kevin; Coppola, Gianluca et al

in Cephalalgia Reports (2018)

Rather than a localized alteration, increased visual reactivity in migraine patients seems to result from a complex interaction between several brain structures, mostly involving the ventral attention ... [more ▼]

Rather than a localized alteration, increased visual reactivity in migraine patients seems to result from a complex interaction between several brain structures, mostly involving the ventral attention network. The hub of this network is the right temporo-parietal junction. In this report, complementing our previous findings, we describe the differences in seed to-voxel resting-state functional connectivity seeded in the right temporo-parietal junction (right angular gyrus) between migraine patients and healthy controls. Resting-state functional MRIs of episodic migraine without aura patients in the interictal period (n ¼ 19) and matched healthy controls (n ¼ 19) were analysed. With the seed placed in the right temporo-parietal junction (right angular gyrus), seed-to-voxel connectivity was compared between groups. Electrophysiological, voxel-based morphometry (both groups) and specific region of interest (ROI)-to-ROI functional connectivity (migraine patients) data have already been published. Migraine patients showed a higher positive interaction between the right temporo-parietal junction and both temporal poles and a higher negative interaction between this same region and bilateral areas of the visual cortex. On the basis of our results, and because of their established properties as multisensory integration hubs, it is likely that the right temporo-parietal junction and both temporal poles are involved in the altered processing of sensory stimulus commonly observed in migraine patients. Therefore, more attention should be paid to these regions for migraine research in the future. [less ▲]

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See detailAn Investigation of the Late Excitatory Potentials in the Hand following Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Early Alzheimer's Disease.
Balla, christina; PEPIN, Jean-Louis ULiege; MAERTENS DE NOORDHOUT, Alain ULiege

in Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders (2014), 4

BACKGROUND: Recent neuroimaging studies in humans support the clinical observations that the motor cortex is affected early in the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD). PATIENTS AND METHODS: We measured the ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Recent neuroimaging studies in humans support the clinical observations that the motor cortex is affected early in the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD). PATIENTS AND METHODS: We measured the silent period (SP) induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation in AD patients in the very early stage of the disease, and we explored whether and in which way the pharmacologic manipulation of the cholinergic system could modify it. RESULTS: An increase in the duration of the SP was observed in AD patients in the early stage in comparison to controls. After 2 months of treatment with donepezil, the duration did not differ significantly from that of normal subjects. The results of our study show a fragmentation and an enlargement of the SP in the presence of multiple late excitatory potentials (LEPs) in early untreated AD patients. These LEPs were also modulated by donepezil. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest an early functional impairment of cholinergic neurotransmission in AD. The disturbance in acetylcholine output in early AD leads to a decrease in excitability of the motor system. [less ▲]

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See detailMotor cortex excitability changes in mild Alzheimer's disease are reversed by donepezil.
BALLA, Christina; PEPIN, Jean-Louis ULiege; MAERTENS DE NOORDHOUT, Alain ULiege

in Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders (2014), 38

BACKGROUND: Recent neuroimaging studies in humans support the clinical observations that the motor cortex is affected early in the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD). METHODS: We used transcranial ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Recent neuroimaging studies in humans support the clinical observations that the motor cortex is affected early in the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD). METHODS: We used transcranial magnetic stimulation to measure the active cortical motor threshold (ACMT) in AD patients in the very early stage of the disease, and we explored whether and in which way the pharmacologic manipulation of the cholinergic system could have a direct effect on the excitability of the motor cortex. RESULTS: An increase of the ACMT was observed in AD patients in the early stage in comparison to controls. After 2 months of treatment with donepezil, the threshold did not differ significantly from normal subjects. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest an early functional impairment of cholinergic neurotransmission in AD, which is associated to early changes in the excitability of the motor system. [less ▲]

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See detailAbnormal corticospinal excitability in patients with disorders of consciousness
Lapitskaya, Natallia; Gosseries, Olivia ULiege; DE PASQUA, Victor ULiege et al

in Brain Stimulation (2013), Volume 6

Background: Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been frequently used to explore changes in the human motor cortex in different conditions, while the extent of motor cortex reorganization in ... [more ▼]

Background: Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been frequently used to explore changes in the human motor cortex in different conditions, while the extent of motor cortex reorganization in patients in vegetative state (VS) (now known as unresponsive wakefulness syndrome, UWS) and minimally conscious (MCS) states due to severe brain damage remains largely unknown. Objective/hypothesis: It was hypothesized that cortical motor excitability would be decreased and would correlate to the level of consciousness in patients with disorders of consciousness. Methods: Corticospinal excitability was assessed in 47 patients (24 VS/UWS and 23 MCS) and 14 healthy controls. The test parameters included maximal peak-to-peak M-wave (Mmax), F-wave persistence, peripheral and central motor conduction times, sensory (SEP) and motor evoked (MEP) potential latencies and amplitudes, resting motor threshold (RMT), stimulus/response curves, and short latency afferent inhibition (SAI). TMS measurements were correlated to the level of consciousness (assessed using the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised). Results: On average, the patient group had lower Mmax, lower MEP and SEP amplitudes, higher RMTs, narrower stimulus/response curves, and reduced SAI compared to the healthy controls (P < 0.05). The SAI alterations were correlated to the level of consciousness (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The findings demonstrated the impairment of the cortical inhibitory circuits in patients with disorders of consciousness. Moreover, the significant relationship was found between cortical inhibition and clinical consciousness dysfunction. [less ▲]

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See detailTreatments for progressing Parkinson's disease: a clinical case scenario study.
MAERTENS DE NOORDHOUT, Alain ULiege; Santens, Patrick; Gerard, Jean-Marie et al

in Acta Neurologica Belgica (2009), 109(3), 189-99

OBJECTIVE: A 'case scenario' study on clinical decisions in progressing Parkinson's disease (PD) was developed to complement scientific evidence with the collective judgment of a panel of experts. METHODS ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: A 'case scenario' study on clinical decisions in progressing Parkinson's disease (PD) was developed to complement scientific evidence with the collective judgment of a panel of experts. METHODS: The opinions of 9 experts in movement disorders on the appropriateness of 9 common pharmacological treatments for 33 hypothetical patient profiles were compared to those of 14 general neurologists. Before rating the case scenarios, all participants received a document integrating European and US guidelines for the treatment of patients with advanced PD. Case scenarios showing disagreement or with inconsistencies in appropriateness ratings were discussed at a feedback meeting. A tool for interactive discussion on the clinical case scenarios included was developed based on the outcome of the study. RESULTS: Current guidelines are often insufficient to adequately guide the management of patients with progressing PD. The case scenario study did not reveal major differences in opinions between experts in movement disorders and general neurologists about the appropriateness of certain drug choices for specific case scenarios. However in about 1 out of 5 treatment decisions where experts stated appropriateness or inappropriateness, the general neurologists panel had no or dispersed opinions. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals more uncertainty about treatment of advanced PD in general neurologists compared with experts in movement disorders and underlines the need for additional support for guiding treatment decisions in clinical practice. [less ▲]

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See detailNeurological picture. Extreme unilateral widening of Virchow-Robin spaces
Fumal, Arnaud ULiege; Maertens De Noordhout, Alain ULiege; Collignon, Laurent

in Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry (2009), 80(1), 64-65

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See detailTranscranial magnetic stimulation in disorders of consciousness
Lapitskaya, N.; Gosseries, Olivia ULiege; DELVAUX, Valérie ULiege et al

in Reviews in the Neurosciences (2009), 20(3-4), 235-250

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See detailTraitement de la maladie de Parkinson en 2009.
MAERTENS DE NOORDHOUT, Alain ULiege

in Revue Médicale Suisse (2009), 5(214), 1650-5

The cause of Parkinson's disease remains unknown and no cure or prevention exists so far. Levodopa remains by far the most potent symptomatic therapy, but induces side-effects such as motor fluctuations ... [more ▼]

The cause of Parkinson's disease remains unknown and no cure or prevention exists so far. Levodopa remains by far the most potent symptomatic therapy, but induces side-effects such as motor fluctuations and abnormal movements, which can somewhat be counterbalanced by optimizing levodopa plasma levels or acting at receptors level with long half-life dopamine agonists. In severe cases, functional surgery with deep brain stimulation can be offered. Some non-dopaminergic symptoms like dementia, freezing, postural instability or dysautonomia do not respond to dopaminergic drugs and need special care. [less ▲]

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See detailDisorders of consciousness: further pathophysiological insights using motor cortex transcranial magnetic stimulation.
Lapitskaya, Natallia; Coleman, Martin R.; Nielsen, Joergen Feldbaek et al

in Progress in Brain Research (2009)

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive means of investigating the function, plasticity, and excitability of the human brain. TMS induces a brief intracranial electrical current, which ... [more ▼]

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive means of investigating the function, plasticity, and excitability of the human brain. TMS induces a brief intracranial electrical current, which produces action potentials in excitable cells. Stimulation applied over the motor cortex can be used to measure overall excitability of the corticospinal system, somatotopic representation of muscles, and subsequent plastic changes following injury. The facilitation and inhibition characteristics of the cerebral cortex can also be compared using the modulatory effect of a conditioning stimulus preceding a test stimulus. So called paired-pulse protocols have been used in humans and animals to assess GABA (gamma-amino-butyric acid)-ergic function and may have a future role directing therapeutic interventions. Indeed, repetitive magnetic stimulation, where intracranial currents are induced by repetitive stimulation higher than 1 Hz, has been shown to modulate brain responses to sensory and cognitive stimulation. Here, we summarize information gathered using TMS with patients in coma, vegetative state, and minimally conscious state. Although in the early stages of investigation, there is preliminary evidence that TMS represents a promising tool by which to elucidate the pathophysiological sequelae of impaired consciousness and potentially direct future therapeutic interventions. We will discuss the methodology of work conducted to date, as well as debate the general limitations and pitfalls of TMS studies in patients with altered states of consciousness. [less ▲]

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See detailMotor neuron disorders : novel electrophysiologic approach (MUFDEC protocol)
WANG, François-Charles ULiege; Le Forestier, Nadine; WANG, Pascale ULiege et al

in Clinical Neurophysiology (2009), Suppl(Vol 60), 143-152

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See detailInterprétation de l'index IgG et du diagramme de Reiber par Protis 2 dans les maladies inflammatoires du système nerveux central
Gillain, Nicole; FUMAL, Arnaud ULiege; NEVE, C. et al

in Immuno-Analyse and Biologie Spécialisée (2009), (24), 135-147

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See detailRtms in Headache Prophylaxis: When Case Reports Hide Our Ignorance
Fumal, Arnaud ULiege; MAERTENS DE NOORDHOUT, Alain ULiege; Schoenen, Jean ULiege

in CNS Spectrums (2008), 13(3), 185-7

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See detailTMS of the occipital cortex induces tactile sensations in the fingers of blind Braille readers
Ptito, M.; Fumal, Arnaud ULiege; Maertens De Noordhout, Alain ULiege et al

in Experimental Brain Research (2008), 184(2), 193-200

Various non-visual inputs produce cross-modal responses in the visual cortex of early blind subjects. In order to determine the qualitative experience associated with these occipital activations, we ... [more ▼]

Various non-visual inputs produce cross-modal responses in the visual cortex of early blind subjects. In order to determine the qualitative experience associated with these occipital activations, we systematically stimulated the entire occipital cortex using single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in early blind subjects and in blindfolded seeing controls. Whereas blindfolded seeing controls reported only phosphenes following occipital cortex stimulation, some of the blind subjects reported tactile sensations in the fingers that were somatotopically organized onto the visual cortex. The number of cortical sites inducing tactile sensations appeared to be related to the number of hours of Braille reading per day, Braille reading speed and dexterity. These data, taken in conjunction with previous anatomical, behavioural and functional imaging results, suggest the presence of a polysynaptic cortical pathway between the somatosensory cortex and the visual cortex in early blind subjects. These results also add new evidence that the activity of the occipital lobe in the blind takes its qualitative expression from the character of its new input source, therefore supporting the cortical deference hypothesis. [less ▲]

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