References of "Lhoest, Simon"
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See detailQuel est le potentiel des drones pour inventorier les populations animales ?
Lhoest, Simon ULiege; Authelet, Manon ULiege; Bouché, Philippe et al

Conference given outside the academic context (2019)

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See detailEcosystem services assessment in Southeast Cameroon tropical forests
Lhoest, Simon ULiege; Dufrêne, Marc ULiege; Jamar, Pierre et al

Scientific conference (2019, March 11)

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See detailConservation value of protected and logged tropical forests in Cameroon
Lhoest, Simon ULiege; Fonteyn, Davy ULiege; Daïnou, Kasso ULiege et al

Scientific conference (2019, January 25)

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See detailAssessment of mammal biodiversity and bushmeat offtake in the tropical forests of southeastern Cameroon
Lhoest, Simon ULiege; Fonteyn, Davy ULiege; Hette, Samuel et al

Poster (2018, November 27)

Tropical forests of central Africa host an important part of the world’s terrestrial biodiversity and provide numerous provisioning, regulating, and cultural ecosystem services to human populations. Major ... [more ▼]

Tropical forests of central Africa host an important part of the world’s terrestrial biodiversity and provide numerous provisioning, regulating, and cultural ecosystem services to human populations. Major threats hang over those diverse ecosystems, namely land use changes and consumption of bushmeat. Our study aimed to assess mammal diversity and bushmeat consumption in three contrasted and largely represented forest land allocation types in southeastern Cameroon: (i) a protected area, (ii) a FSC-certified logging concession, and (iii) three community forests. Mammal inventories were conducted with 44 camera traps installed for 3 months. Bushmeat consumption was quantified using both tracking of volunteer hunters over 651 kilometers and the daily monitoring of the food bowl of 55 households for 3 months. Though a great part of the mammal diversity is retained inside the logging concession, the protected area holds the richest and most abundant mammal communities, whereas community forests were found to be defaunated and structurally disturbed. The size of the hunting territories is influenced by many factors such as human population density or the presence of alternative protein sources. Although poaching controls in the protected area and, to a lesser extent, in the certified logging concession appear to play a deterrent role, evidence of hunting activities were found in all land allocation types. Bushmeat represents on average 56% of the animal protein consumed by households, the remaining part being mainly fish. Our results demonstrated the ability of the certified logging concession and the protected area in the conservation of wildlife species and the provision of bushmeat for local populations. It remains essential to maintain and develop anti-poaching patrols in those areas, strategically based on geographic data of hunting pressure. Current levels of hunting activities also confirm the need for the development of alternatives to bushmeat. [less ▲]

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See detailUAS imagery reveals new survey opportunities for counting hippos
Linchant, Julie ULiege; Lhoest, Simon ULiege; Quevauvillers, Samuel ULiege et al

in PLoS ONE (2018), 13(11), 0206413

Introduction The common hippopotamus Hippopotamus amphibius L. is a vulnerable species that requires efficient methods to monitor its populations for conservation purposes. Rapid evolution of civil drones ... [more ▼]

Introduction The common hippopotamus Hippopotamus amphibius L. is a vulnerable species that requires efficient methods to monitor its populations for conservation purposes. Rapid evolution of civil drones provides new opportunities but survey protocols still need development. This study aims to determine the optimal flight parameters for accurate population estimates. A second objective is to evaluate the effects of three environmental factors: wind speed, sun reflection and cloud cover. Method We estimated the population of two main hippo schools (Dungu and Wilibadi II) located in Garamba National Park in Democratic republic of Congo. Eight observers reviewed 252 photos taken over the Dungu school, representing a total of 2016 experimental units. A detection rate and a level of certainty were associated with each experimental unit, and five parameters were related to each count: flight height, three environmental parameters (sun reflection on water surface, cloud cover, and wind speed), and observers’ experience. Results Flight height reduced the observers’ confidence in their detection ability, rather than the detection itself. For accurate counts of large groups an average height of 150 m was shown to be a good compromise between animal detection without zooming in and the area covered in one frame. Wind speed had little influence on the counts, but it affected the performance of the UAS. Sun reflection reduced the detection rate of hippos and increased level of certainty, while cloud cover reduced detection rates slightly. Therefore, we recommend flying when the sun is still low on the horizon and when there is little cloud, or when cloud cover is light and even. This last point reinforces our recommendation for flights early in the day. The counts also showed large differences between groups of inexperienced and experienced observers. Experienced observers achieved better detection rates and were generally more confident in their detection. Experienced observers detected 86.5% of the hippos on average (confidence interval = ±0.76%). When applied to data from the second site, the detection was 84.3% (confidence interval = ±1.84%). Two correction factors were then calculated, as the inverse of the detection rate, based on the estimated number of hippos present during one flight (Factor 1) or in the general population respectively (Factor 2). Factor 2 especially was consistent with previous studies using traditional aerial counts (1.22 vs 1.25). Factor 2 was found to be appropriate for use by experienced observers. These results confirm the use of correction factor 2 for hippo surveys, regardless of the study site, as it accounts for hippo behavior. Optimum counting and cost efficiency were achieved with two trained observers counting 7 pictures. Conclusion This study is a promising approach for routine surveys of the hippopotamus which is a species usually ignored in wildlife counts. Drone technology is expected to improve rapidly; therefore UAS could become a very useful and affordable survey tool for other species requiring specific monitoring. [less ▲]

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See detailForêts, services écosystémiques et produits forestiers non-ligneux
Verheggen, François ULiege; Lhoest, Simon ULiege; Hette, Samuel et al

Learning material (2018)

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See detailÉvaluation de la biodiversité et des services écosystémiques dans les forêts tropicales du sud-est Cameroun
Lhoest, Simon ULiege

Conference given outside the academic context (2018)

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See detailÉvaluation de la biodiversité et des services écosystémiques dans les forêts tropicales du sud-est Cameroun
Lhoest, Simon ULiege

Scientific conference (2018, September 17)

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See detailWalloon researchers on ecosystem services... What's up?
Maebe, Laura ULiege; Authelet, Manon ULiege; Breyne, Johanna ULiege et al

Poster (2017, December 12)

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See detailDoes biodiversity really matter to benefit from the ecosystem services provided by Central African forests?
Lhoest, Simon ULiege; Fayolle, Adeline ULiege; Dufrêne, Marc ULiege

Poster (2017, December 12)

Deforestation and degradation constitute the main threats to biodiversity in tropical forest ecosystems. Understanding the impacts of these changes on the services provided to human populations is ... [more ▼]

Deforestation and degradation constitute the main threats to biodiversity in tropical forest ecosystems. Understanding the impacts of these changes on the services provided to human populations is essential to implement a sustainable management of tropical forest resources. The objective of this PhD thesis is to analyze the interactions between biodiversity and ecosystem services of tropical moist forests for three contrasted land allocation types. The study area is located in South-East Cameroon, and is divided into three zones: a protected area (the Dja Wildlife Reserve), a FSC-certified logging concession (Pallisco) and community forests managed by local communities. The impacts of the three land allocation types are quantified according to several state (biodiversity) and impact (ecosystem services) indicators. The integrated analysis of the relations between biodiversity and ecosystem services allow to identify the synergies and trade-offs between them, while identifying the adequacy of management practices implemented in the way to chase their main aim. [less ▲]

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