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See detailSignes dans les textes, Continuités et ruptures des pratiques scribales en Égypte pharaonique, gréco-romaine et byzantine, Actes du colloque international de Liège (2-4 juin 2016)
Carlig, Nathan ULiege; Lescuyer, Guillaume ULiege; Motte, Aurore ULiege et al

Book published by PULg (in press)

This book contains seventeen papers of the international conference "Sign in Texts: Research on Continuities and Changes in Scribal Practices in Pharaonic, Graeco-Roman and Byzantine Egypt", organized at ... [more ▼]

This book contains seventeen papers of the international conference "Sign in Texts: Research on Continuities and Changes in Scribal Practices in Pharaonic, Graeco-Roman and Byzantine Egypt", organized at the University of Liège (2-4 June 2016) by the Liège-based Centre de Documentation de Papyrologie Littéraire (CEDOPAL) and the Egyptology Department. The conference brought into dialogue Egyptologists, classical philologists, papyrologists, demotics, as well as Arabic and Coptic scholars from Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, and the United Kingdom. This volume is a continuation of the proceedings recently published by G. Nocchi Macedo and M.C. Scappaticcio (Signs in Texts, Texts on Signs. Erudition, Reading and Writing in the Greco-Roman world, Liège, 2017, Papyrologica Leodiensia 6), which results itself from a conference held in September 2013 and devoted to the study of signs in Greek and Latin writings from the fourth century BC to the sixteenth century AD. The conference from which this book ensues aimed at studying the scribal practices of the Pharaonic, Greco-Roman, Byzantine and Arab periods (until the eleventh century BC) in the geographical framework of Egypt. It took into account both literary and documentary texts written on papyrus, parchment, ostraca, wood tablets, and stone. The studied languages were Ancient Egyptian (hieroglyphic and hieratic), Arabic, Demotic, Greek, Latin, and Coptic. The second aim of this conference was the identifications of continuities or breaks in the use of signs around the main text. For the very first time, the question of “signs” – defined sometimes as paratextuals, sometimes as diacritics – is discussed within this volume in an interdisciplinary and diachronic perspective. [less ▲]

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See detailAvant-propos
Motte, Aurore ULiege; Lescuyer, Guillaume ULiege; Carlig, Nathan ULiege et al

in Carlig, Nathan; Lescuyer, Guillaume; Motte, Aurore (Eds.) et al Signes dans les textes, Continuités et ruptures des pratiques scribales en Égypte pharaonique, gréco-romaine et byzantine, Actes du colloque international de Liège (2-4 juin 2016) (in press)

Présentation succincte des contributions du volume.

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See detailContexts and Inferences. The grammaticalization of the Later Egyptian Allative Future
Grossman, Eitan; Lescuyer, Guillaume ULiege; Polis, Stéphane ULiege

in Grossman, Eitan; Polis, Stéphane; Stauder, Andréas (Eds.) et al On Forms and Functions: Studies in Ancient Egyptian Grammar (2014)

The goal of this paper is to describe the gradual emergence of an innovative future construction in the extant Late Egyptian and Demotic textual material and to discuss the grammaticalization of this ... [more ▼]

The goal of this paper is to describe the gradual emergence of an innovative future construction in the extant Late Egyptian and Demotic textual material and to discuss the grammaticalization of this construction down to Coptic, where it became a regular future form known as the “First Future” or “Future I”. We propose that, during the grammaticalization process, the selectional restrictions of the construction are relaxed due to the spread of speaker-oriented inferences. As a consequence, new types of subject and predicates can appear and innovative grammatical meanings associated with future time reference, e.g., prediction, become increasingly entrenched. In a final section, we briefly comment on the future cycles in Ancient Egyptian and propose that the comparative notion of allative future is not only useful for comparing specific patterns across languages, but also within a single language with a lengthy attested history. [less ▲]

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