References of "Laroi, Frank"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTesting a model of auditory hallucinations: the role of negative emotions and cognitive resources
Laloyaux, Julien ULiege; De Keyser, F; Pinchard, A et al

in Cognitive Neuropsychiatry (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (4 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSleep deprivation and hallucinations: A qualitative study of military personnel
Pallesen, S; Olsen, O.K:; Eide, E.M. et al

in Military Psychology (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (1 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDisentangling false perceptions elicited by white noise in people with auditory hallucinations: The role of sound frequencies and expectations.
Laloyaux, Julien ULiege; Specht, K; Hugdahl, K et al

in Schizophrenia Bulletin (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (1 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAge effect on the hierarchical structure of paranoia in the general population: the role of rumination and thought suppression.
Della Libera, Clara ULiege; Laroi, Frank ULiege; Raffard, Stéphan et al

in Schizophrenia Bulletin (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (7 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailVidéos 360° : Validation d'un nouvel outil de mesure de la paranoïa dans la population générale.
Della Libera, Clara ULiege; Quertemont, Etienne ULiege; Laloyaux, Julien ULiege et al

Poster (2019, June 06)

Introduction : Depuis une quinzaine d’années, la réalité virtuelle est utilisée comme nouvel outil pour étudier la paranoïa. Un tel dispositif est cependant coûteu et requiert la modélisation d’avatar peu ... [more ▼]

Introduction : Depuis une quinzaine d’années, la réalité virtuelle est utilisée comme nouvel outil pour étudier la paranoïa. Un tel dispositif est cependant coûteu et requiert la modélisation d’avatar peu réalistes en termes d’expressions faciales et corporelles. Une alternative intéressante est l’utilisation de vidéos 360° permettant la création d’environnements immersifs plus accessibles et écologiques. L’objectif de cette étude est de valider l’utilisation de vidéos 360° comme nouvelle mesure de la paranoïa dans la population générale. Méthode : Un bar, un ascenseur et une bibliothèque ont été filmés avec 4 à 15 acteurs afin de représenter une situation de vie quotidienne. Cent septante participants ont été évalués sur leur tendance générale à la paranoïa (trait) avant d’être insérés dans l’une des vidéos à l’aide d’un casque Oculus Go. Les participants ont ensuite complété une mesure de paranoïa état, une mesure du sentiment de présence et répondu à un entretien semi-structuré interrogeant leurs interprétations des interactions perçues au sein des vidéos. Résultats : Dans l’ascenseur et la bibliothèque uniquement, les résultats montrent que les participants développent un sentiment de présence au sein des vidéos. De plus, de bonnes corrélations entre la paranoïa trait et la paranoïa état indiquent une bonne validité convergente de la mesure. Enfin, les participants avec un haut score de paranoïa trait rapportent des intentions malveillantes à leur égard de la part des acteurs durant l’entretien semi-structuré. Conclusion : La présente étude valide l’utilisation de vidéos 360° pour l’étude de la paranoïa. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (0 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUsing immersive 360° videos to asses sub-clinical forms of paranoia in the general population
Della Libera, Clara ULiege; Quertemont, Etienne ULiege; Laroi, Frank ULiege

Poster (2019, May 14)

For around fifteen years, virtual reality has been used as a new tool for studying paranoia. However, the use of virtual reality is expensive and requires the modelling of avatars that remain far from ... [more ▼]

For around fifteen years, virtual reality has been used as a new tool for studying paranoia. However, the use of virtual reality is expensive and requires the modelling of avatars that remain far from realistic in terms of facial and bodily expressions. As an alternative, 360-degree videos allow the creation of immersive environments to be more accessible and much more human-like. The aim of the present study was to validate a set of 360-degree videos as tools to identify sub-clinical forms of paranoia in the general population. Three videos representing daily scenarios (with four to fifteen actors) were created in a bar, a lift and a library. One hundred and seventy participants were assessed in terms of their general tendency towards paranoia (trait paranoia) before they viewed one video (using an Oculus Go headset). Finally, participants completed the State Paranoia Scale and the Sense of Presence Inventory. For both the lift and the library videos: an adequate sense of presence was found, and significant correlations between trait paranoia and state paranoia indicated good convergent and divergent validity. The present study suggests that the use of 360° videos is a promising tool to study forms of paranoia in the general population. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (1 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHallucination Research: Into the Future, and Beyond
Jardri, R; Laroi, Frank ULiege; Waters, F

in Schizophrenia Bulletin (2019), 45

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe ice in voices: Understanding negative content in auditory-verbal hallucinations.
Laroi, Frank ULiege; Thomas, Neil; Aleman, Andre et al

in Clinical Psychology Review (2019), 67

Negative voice-content is the best sole predictor of whether the hearer of an auditory-verbal hallucination will experience distress/impairment necessitating contact with mental health services. Yet, what ... [more ▼]

Negative voice-content is the best sole predictor of whether the hearer of an auditory-verbal hallucination will experience distress/impairment necessitating contact with mental health services. Yet, what causes negative voice-content and how interventions may reduce it remains poorly understood. This paper offers definitions of negative voice content and considers what may cause negative voice-content. We propose a framework in which adverse life-events may underpin much negative voice-content, a relation which may be mediated by mechanisms including hypervigilance, reduced social rank, shame and self-blame, dissociation, and altered emotional processing. At a neurological level, we note how the involvement of the amygdala and right Broca's area could drive negative voice-content. We observe that negative interactions between hearers and their voices may further drive negative voice-content. Finally, we consider the role of culture in shaping negative voice-content. This framework is intended to deepen and extend cognitive models of voice-hearing and spur further development of psychological interventions for those distressed by such voices. We note that much of the relevant research in this area remains to be performed or replicated. We conclude that more attention needs to be paid to methods for reducing negative voice-content, and urge further research in this important area. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (1 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffects of sexualized video games on online sexual harassment
Burnay, Jonathan ULiege; Bushman, Brad; Laroi, Frank ULiege

in Aggressive Behavior (2019), 45(2), 214-223

Negative consequences of video games have been a concern since their inception. However, one under‐researched area is the potential negative effects of sexualized video game content on players. This study ... [more ▼]

Negative consequences of video games have been a concern since their inception. However, one under‐researched area is the potential negative effects of sexualized video game content on players. This study analyzed the consequences of sexualized video game content on online sexual harassment against male and female targets. We controlled for a number of variables that might be related to online sexual harassment (i.e., trait aggressiveness, ambivalent sexism, online disinhibition). Participants (N = 211) played a video game with either sexualized or non‐sexualized female characters. After gameplay, they had the opportunity to sexually harass a male or a female partner by sending them sexist jokes. Based on the General Aggression Model integrated with the Confluence Model of Sexual Aggression (Anderson & Anderson, 2008), we predicted that playing the game with sexualized female characters would increase sexual harassment against female targets. Results were consistent with these predictions. Sexual harassment levels toward a female partner were higher for participants who played the game with sexualized female characters than for participants who played the same game with non‐sexualized female characters. These findings indicate that sexualization of female characters in a video game can be a sufficient condition to provoke online sexual harassment toward women. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 174 (9 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPotential Applications of Digital Technology in Assessment, Treatment and Self-help for Hallucinations
Thomas, N; Bless, J; Alderson-Day, B et al

in Schizophrenia Bulletin (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (3 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA Cross-national investigation of Hallucination Like-Experiences in 10 countries: The E-CLECTIC study.
Siddi, S; Ocha, S; Laroi, Frank ULiege et al

in Schizophrenia Bulletin (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (2 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailWomen and men are equally bad at multitasking.
Laloyaux, Julien ULiege; Laroi, Frank ULiege; Hirnstein, M

in Harward Business Review (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (1 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailApproche multidimensionnelle de la schizophrénie: évaluations et interventions
Thonon, Bénédicte ULiege; Laroi, Frank ULiege

Conference (2018, June 01)

Présentation et distribution d’un manuel par clé USB

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (11 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHallucinations in Alzheimer's disease: failure to suppress irrelevant memories
El Haj Mohammad; Gallouj Karim; Dehon, Hedwige ULiege et al

in Cognitive Neuropsychiatry (2018)

Introduction: Research with patients with schizophrenia suggests that inhibitory dysfunction leads to the emergence of redundant or irrelevant information from long-term memory into awareness, and that ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Research with patients with schizophrenia suggests that inhibitory dysfunction leads to the emergence of redundant or irrelevant information from long-term memory into awareness, and that this process may be involved in generating hallucinations. We investigated whether inhibitory dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) leads to hallucinations. Method: AD participants and healthy matched controls were assessed with a hallucinations scale and a directed forgetting task. On the directed forgetting task, they were asked to retain a list of 10 words (i.e., List 1). Thereafter, half of the participants were asked to forget this list whereas the other half were asked to retain the list in memory. After the List 1 presentation, all participants were asked to retain another list of 10 words and, successively, were asked to remember all of the words from both lists, regardless of the previous forget or remember instruction. Results: Relative to healthy matched controls, AD participants showed difficulties in suppressing the words from List 1. AD participants also showed more hallucinatory experiences than healthy matched controls. Interestingly, a significant correlation was observed between the score on the hallucinations measure and difficulties in suppressing List 1 in AD participants. Discussion: Hallucinations in AD may, at least in part, be related to difficulties in suppressing memory representations, such that unwanted or repetitive thoughts intrude into consciousness. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (7 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSource flexibility in schizophrenia: Specificity and role in auditory hallucinations
Laloyaux, Julien ULiege; Della Libera, Clara ULiege; Laroi, Frank ULiege

in Cognitive Neuropsychiatry (2018), 23

Introduction: One important aspect of human cognition relies on the ability to bias attention towards stimulus-independent and stimulus-oriented thoughts and to switch between these states–or source ... [more ▼]

Introduction: One important aspect of human cognition relies on the ability to bias attention towards stimulus-independent and stimulus-oriented thoughts and to switch between these states–or source flexibility. This mechanism has received very little attention in the literature, and in particular in schizophrenia. Moreover, there is good reason to believe that this mechanism could also be implicated in hallucinations, but this hypothesis has never been examined. Thus, the aim of the present study was, for the first time in the literature, to explore source flexibility abilities in schizophrenia and their potential relations with auditory hallucinations. Methods: Forty persons diagnosed with schizophrenia and 26 healthy controls were evaluated with tasks assessing source flexibility, cognitive flexibility and processing speed. Patients were also assessed with a measure of hallucinations and delusions. Results: Results revealed that persons diagnosed with schizophrenia presented a poorer performance than healthy controls for source flexibility. Moreover, results demonstrated that source flexibility performance could not be explained by a more general impairment of processing speed or by difficulties in cognitive flexibility. Finally, source flexibility was found to be related to hallucinations. Conclusions: Source flexibility plays an important role in schizophrenia and in particular is a cognitive mechanism involved in hallucinations. © 2018, © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (4 ULiège)