References of "Lafleur, Jean-Michel"
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See detailWelfare entitlements, consular services, and diaspora policies in non-EU sending states
Vintila, Cristina-Daniela ULiege; Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege

in Lafleur, Jean-Michel; Vintila, Cristina-Daniela (Eds.) Migration and social protection in Europe and beyond: a focus on non-EU sending states (Volume 3) (in press)

In the first part of this introductory chapter, we will briefly summarize the definition of the main concepts by referring to the introductory chapters of Volumes 1 and 2 which provide a more in-depth ... [more ▼]

In the first part of this introductory chapter, we will briefly summarize the definition of the main concepts by referring to the introductory chapters of Volumes 1 and 2 which provide a more in-depth conceptual discussion of the key notions guiding the three volumes. The second and the third part will discuss different contextual elements that help us to better understand the main dynamics of access to social protection in non-EU sending states. In the second part, we will discuss and compare the specificities of welfare regimes across the 12 non-EU countries included in our analysis. Based on previous studies, we will particularly highlight: a) the different historical development of social policies in non-EU contexts; b) the fact that specific schemes of social benefits rather generalised across European welfare regimes (as discussed in Volume 1) are absent in non-EU contexts or replaced by schemes following a quite different rationale and understanding of social exclusion risks; c) trends of policy diffusion by which non-EU sending states have implemented specific institutional schemes previously formalised in other contexts (including the EU, but also other countries from the same region) by adapting them to the specificities of the domestic environment and; d) recent developments of social protection cooperation within the framework of regional integration schemes in non-EU areas. The third part of the chapter will map out the main migration features of non-EU countries, thus aiming to capture the extent to which demographic pressures for the extension of social protection for different groups of mobile individuals have been translated into specific policies aiming to prevent these groups from facing social risks. In doing so, we will discuss the main historical drivers of migration to and from non-EU countries and provide an overview of the most important features of recent migration inflows and outflows shaping the immigration and emigration policy of these states. Furthermore, particular attention will be paid to specific migration policy developments at the intra-regional level (affecting mostly the access of intra-regional non-national residents to welfare in third countries) and key initiatives of bilateral and multilateral cooperation in the field of social security between non-EU sending states and EU countries allowing for a certain level of (ex)portability of social benefits (which affect not only the social protection coverage of third-country nationals residing in the EU, but also EU citizens’ access to welfare in third countries). The fourth part of the chapter will analytically confront (the absence of) sending states’ social policies in specific areas with their engagement in diaspora policies. Drawing on this analytical framework focusing on a potential trade-off between social protection and diaspora policies, the section will cluster the 12 non-EU countries included in the analysis according to the existence/absence of gaps in the policy attention they give to social protection issues faced by mobile and non-mobile citizens. Finally, the last part of the chapter will aim to summarize key explanatory variables (including the nature of welfare regimes, the history and drivers of migration, the economic and political leverage of migrant populations in/from non-EU countries) behind the variations in timing and scope of the social and diaspora policy developments observed across the 12 non-EU countries included in this Volume. [less ▲]

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See detailSending states’ engagement with citizens abroad- conceptual and methodological challenges
Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege; Vintila, Cristina-Daniela ULiege

in Lafleur, Jean-Michel; Vintila, Cristina-Daniela (Eds.) Migration and social protection in Europe and beyond: comparing consular services and diaspora policies (Volume 2) (in press)

In this introductory chapter, we define and discuss the concepts used throughout the country chapters that compose this Volume and present a comparative analytical framework that allow us to compare EU ... [more ▼]

In this introductory chapter, we define and discuss the concepts used throughout the country chapters that compose this Volume and present a comparative analytical framework that allow us to compare EU Member States’ engagement with their emigrant populations. In the conceptual section of the article, we critically engage with the existing literature that has documented an intensification of sending states’ activism and creativity in engaging with this population. In doing so, we highlight several explanatory variables identified in past studies, such as increasing mobility, the economic dependence on migration (and in particular remittances), democratization, the desire to gain the political support of citizens abroad, or a shift to neo-liberal modalities of government. Yet, we argue that existing attempts to classify state engagement with citizens abroad present four important limitations: 1) they neglect the role of supranational institutions such as the EU in determining states’ ability to engage with nationals abroad; 2) they emphasize policy innovations but they overlook important variations in basic consular services offered to nationals abroad; 3) they focus exclusively on sending states from the Global South without the possibility of further generalising these results to other areas; and 4) they do not sufficiently take into account the external dimension of social policies as a form of diaspora engagement. In the second part of the chapter, we comparatively discuss the aggregated results of the country chapters that compose this Volume. To do so, we build an analytical framework around the concept of “consular and diaspora infrastructure”. This concept allows to distinguish and cluster states according to their “hard infrastructure” (i.e. the physical infrastructure put in place by sending states to interact with nationals abroad such as the consular network, agencies, consultative bodies…) and their “soft infrastructure” (i.e. the services offered by consulates, diaspora institutions and welfare institutions to nationals residing abroad). The paper allows to identify how engaged sending states are in addressing social risks faced by nationals residing abroad in five keys areas in the study of immigrant welfare: health, unemployment, old-age, family, and social assistance. Overall, this analysis allows us to cluster EU sending states according to their engagement for citizens abroad in the area of social protection and, at the analytical level, draw a different picture of sending states’ engagement with citizens in which the role of migration history, demographic factors or neoliberal modes of governance has to be reconsidered. To make this argument, we rely on the empirical findings and the discussion on state-diaspora relations contained in the country chapters. [less ▲]

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See detailMigration and access to welfare benefits: conceptual and methodological challenges
Vintila, Cristina-Daniela ULiege; Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege

in Lafleur, Jean-Michel; Vintila, Cristina-Daniela (Eds.) Migration and social protection in Europe and beyond: comparing access to welfare entitlements (Volume 1) (in press)

The main aim of this introductory chapter is to critically discuss the key concepts used throughout the country chapters and propose a comprehensive analytical framework allowing for a systematic ... [more ▼]

The main aim of this introductory chapter is to critically discuss the key concepts used throughout the country chapters and propose a comprehensive analytical framework allowing for a systematic comparison of the levels of inclusiveness/exclusiveness in migrants’ access to social protection in the EU. The first part of the chapter presents the research questions guiding this volume and provides a definition of our conceptual departing point of transnational social protection (official state-based policies/programmes aiming to respond to the social needs of mobile individuals). The section discusses different ways in which mobility has increasingly challenged the territorial principle that traditionally granted access to social benefits: a) via pressures towards host countries to extend access to social entitlements for foreigners based on the ius domicilii principle (residence-based entitlements); b) via specific demands towards home countries to ensure portability of social entitlements independently of the place of residence of the beneficiaries (nationality-based or contribution-based social benefits). This section also explains how migration has become a driver for increasing cooperation between states in the field of social security. We will thus emphasize how the inclusiveness of domestic welfare regimes is often conditioned by bilateral social security agreements between home and host countries and supranational legislation ensuring portability of rights and/or equal treatment provisions within regional integration schemes (the specific case of mobile EU citizens and the EU social security coordination which will be historically contextualised in this introduction). The second section critically engages with the existing scholarship on typologies of immigrant social protection regimes. Drawing on previous studies that aimed to classify the migrant population worldwide based on its access to social protection (see Holzmann et al., 2005 or Avato et al. 2010 among others), we identify several limitations of these existing typologies, including: the inadequacy of their interpretation of eligibility conditions due to an exclusive focus on non-discrimination provisions; their incomplete operationalization of social protection leading to potentially misleading results regarding the inclusiveness of welfare regimes; their over-estimation of the importance of portability of benefits to home countries; or their over-simplification of social protection legislations. The third section proposes an alternative way of measuring the inclusiveness of migrant social protection regimes. We thus explain the main rationale behind the different classifications used in the MiTSoPro project, including the categorization of social policy areas, the array of indicators used for specific entitlements, and the categorization of beneficiaries based on residence and nationality conditions. The section also discusses the main challenges in systematically comparing social entitlements across welfare regimes of different characteristics; and it further acknowledges the limitations of the study (its focus on “rights on paper”, the exclusion of certain migrant groups counting with a special status, difficulties in exporting European-centred typologies of social entitlements to non-European countries). The fourth part of the chapter identifies main patterns of convergence and divergence in the inclusiveness of national welfare regimes towards mobile individuals. Particular attention is paid to: a) the variation of inclusiveness across different policy areas across and within countries; b) inequalities of access to social protection between non-resident nationals and their resident counterparts and the general trend of limited exportability of social rights; c) inequalities of access to social entitlements between national and non-national residents and the differential treatment applied to third-country nationals; d) cross-country classifications of conditions of access to social benefits for mobile individuals. Finally, the last section discusses key explanatory factors for the differences between states and groups identified in the country chapters. In doing so, we explore not only migrants’ characteristics (demographic shares in home/host countries, general migration patterns and history, or their economic and political leverage), but also contextual factors related to their countries of origin and destination, such as the overall policy philosophy towards migration or the nature of the welfare state. [less ▲]

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See detailMigration and social protection in Europe and beyond: a focus on non-EU sending states (Volume 3)
Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege; Vintila, Cristina-Daniela ULiege

Book published by Springer Open Access, IMISCOE Research Series (in press)

In a context of increased ethnic diversity, strong politicisation of migration, and overexposure of mobile individuals to social risks, the access of migrants and their offspring to welfare has become a ... [more ▼]

In a context of increased ethnic diversity, strong politicisation of migration, and overexposure of mobile individuals to social risks, the access of migrants and their offspring to welfare has become a key area of concern across European democracies. The recent financial crisis has further intensified the salience of this topic in political discourses, at the societal level, and among social scientists. While a rapidly growing body of scholarship has explored how the strong supranational framework of EU social security coordination affects intra-EU migrants’ access to social benefits (see Sindbjerg Martinsen, 2005 or Blaugerger and Schmidt, 2014, among others), little is known so far about the procedures, scope and extension of welfare entitlements for third-country nationals in European destination countries (European Migration Network, 2014). Furthermore, the knowledge on the array of social benefits that states make available to non-citizen residents have been predominantly restricted to case studies, with relatively little evidence of larger cross-national research (see Holzmann et al., 2005; Sainsbury, 2006; Sabates-Wheeler and Feldman, 2011). Additionally, since migrants’ access to welfare has been traditionally studied from the perspective of receiving states, the critical role that sending states could play in protecting their nationals abroad against exposure to social risks is still understudied (Gamlen, 2008; Lafleur, 2013). This book is part of a series of 3 volumes that seek to address this research gap by providing the first comprehensive cross-country comparison of social protection policies and programmes targeting individuals in situation of international mobility. The 3 volumes adopt a top-down analytical approach of the concept of Transnational Social Protection from above, thus aiming to provide answers to the following research questions: Do migrants have access to social protection in Europe and in selected countries of origin located outside of Europe? What kind of social benefits can they access in their countries of residence and what type of social protection entitlements can they export from their countries of origin? Do some migrant groups benefit from an easier formal access to welfare benefits than others? Do some countries offer more inclusive social protection regimes for immigrants and emigrants alike? Beyond classic welfare state policies, how do consular and diaspora policies help nationals abroad address social risks? This third volume complements the first ones by taking the perspective of non-EU countries on immigrant social protection. Focusing on 12 of the largest sending countries to the EU, we present 24 chapters that follow the same structure as the one presented in volume 1 and 2. In other words, two “mirroring” chapters are dedicated to each of the 12 non-EU states analysed. One chapter focuses on access to social benefits across five core policy areas (health care, unemployment, old-age pensions, family benefits, guaranteed minimum resources) by highlighting the type of social protection policies that those countries offer to national residents, non-national residents, and non-resident nationals. The second “mirroring” chapter focuses on the same non-EU sending state but discusses the role of three key actors (consulates, diaspora institutions and home country ministries/agencies responsible for specific social policy areas) through which the country of origin interacts with its nationals abroad across the five policy areas previously mentioned. In short, this volume applies the approach developed in volume 1 and 2 to the specific cases of non-EU sending states. By doing so, the reader will be able to comprehend in one single volume what combination of social policy schemes and diaspora/consular programmes are available to the 12 major groups of third-country nationals residing in the EU. [less ▲]

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See detailMigration and social protection in Europe and beyond: comparing consular services and diaspora policies (Volume 2)
Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege; Vintila, Cristina-Daniela ULiege

Book published by Springer Open Access, IMISCOE Research Series (in press)

In a context of increased ethnic diversity, strong politicisation of migration, and overexposure of mobile individuals to social risks, the access of migrants and their offspring to welfare has become a ... [more ▼]

In a context of increased ethnic diversity, strong politicisation of migration, and overexposure of mobile individuals to social risks, the access of migrants and their offspring to welfare has become a key area of concern across European democracies. The recent financial crisis has further intensified the salience of this topic in political discourses, at the societal level, and among social scientists. While a rapidly growing body of scholarship has explored how the strong supranational framework of EU social security coordination affects intra-EU migrants’ access to social benefits (see Sindbjerg Martinsen, 2005 or Blaugerger and Schmidt, 2014, among others), little is known so far about the procedures, scope and extension of welfare entitlements for third-country nationals in European destination countries (European Migration Network, 2014). Furthermore, the knowledge on the array of social benefits that states make available to non-citizen residents have been predominantly restricted to case studies, with relatively little evidence of larger cross-national research (see Holzmann et al., 2005; Sainsbury, 2006; Sabates-Wheeler and Feldman, 2011). Additionally, since migrants’ access to welfare has been traditionally studied from the perspective of receiving states, the critical role that sending states could play in protecting their nationals abroad against exposure to social risks is still understudied (Gamlen, 2008; Lafleur, 2013). This book is part of a series of 3 volumes that seek to address this research gap by providing the first comprehensive cross-country comparison of social protection policies and programmes targeting individuals in situation of international mobility. The 3 volumes adopt a top-down analytical approach of the concept of Transnational Social Protection from above, thus aiming to provide answers to the following research questions: Do migrants have access to social protection in Europe and in selected countries of origin located outside of Europe? What kind of social benefits can they access in their countries of residence and what type of social protection entitlements can they export from their countries of origin? Do some migrant groups benefit from an easier formal access to welfare benefits than others? Do some countries offer more inclusive social protection regimes for immigrants and emigrants alike? Beyond classic welfare state policies, how do consular and diaspora policies help nationals abroad address social risks? This second volume complements the first one by looking specifically at the programmes and initiatives led by EU Member States to respond to the social protection needs of their non-resident citizens. This volume discusses the role of three key actors (consulates, diaspora institutions and home country ministries/agencies responsible for specific social policy areas) through which sending states interact with their nationals abroad across five policy areas: health care, unemployment, pensions, family benefits, and guaranteed minimum resources. This second volume also highlights that states often try to ensure the social protection of their nationals abroad by putting forward broader emigration-related policies that go beyond the realm of social security (e.g. specific funds to help nationals abroad deal with economic hardship, scholarships and educational programmes, ad hoc administrative assistance scheme to ensure access to rights, etc.). [less ▲]

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See detailMigration and social protection in Europe and beyond: comparing access to welfare entitlements (Volume 1)
Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege; Vintila, Cristina-Daniela ULiege

Book published by Springer Open Access, IMISCOE Research Series (in press)

In a context of increased ethnic diversity, strong politicisation of migration, and overexposure of mobile individuals to social risks, the access of migrants and their offspring to welfare has become a ... [more ▼]

In a context of increased ethnic diversity, strong politicisation of migration, and overexposure of mobile individuals to social risks, the access of migrants and their offspring to welfare has become a key area of concern across European democracies. The recent financial crisis has further intensified the salience of this topic in political discourses, at the societal level, and among social scientists. While a rapidly growing body of scholarship has explored how the strong supranational framework of EU social security coordination affects intra-EU migrants’ access to social benefits (see Sindbjerg Martinsen, 2005 or Blaugerger and Schmidt, 2014, among others), little is known so far about the procedures, scope and extension of welfare entitlements for third-country nationals in European destination countries (European Migration Network, 2014). Furthermore, the knowledge on the array of social benefits that states make available to non-citizen residents have been predominantly restricted to case studies, with relatively little evidence of larger cross-national research (see Holzmann et al., 2005; Sainsbury, 2006; Sabates-Wheeler and Feldman, 2011). Additionally, since migrants’ access to welfare has been traditionally studied from the perspective of receiving states, the critical role that sending states could play in protecting their nationals abroad against exposure to social risks is still understudied (Gamlen, 2008; Lafleur, 2013). This book is part of a series of 3 volumes that seek to address this research gap by providing the first comprehensive cross-country comparison of social protection policies and programmes targeting individuals in situation of international mobility. The 3 volumes adopt a top-down analytical approach of the concept of Transnational Social Protection from above, thus aiming to provide answers to the following research questions: Do migrants have access to social protection in Europe and in selected countries of origin located outside of Europe? What kind of social benefits can they access in their countries of residence and what type of social protection entitlements can they export from their countries of origin? Do some migrant groups benefit from an easier formal access to welfare benefits than others? Do some countries offer more inclusive social protection regimes for immigrants and emigrants alike? Beyond classic welfare state policies, how do consular and diaspora policies help nationals abroad address social risks? This first volume provides an in-depth analysis of social protection policies (health care, unemployment, pensions, family benefits, and guaranteed minimum resources) that EU Member States make accessible to national residents, EU and non-EU foreign residents, and non-resident nationals. Hence, the volume captures different scenarios in which the interplay between nationality and residence leads to inequalities of access to welfare. Each case study maps the eligibility conditions for accessing social benefits, by paying particular attention to the type of social entitlements that migrants can claim in host countries and/or export from home countries. In each country and for each policy area, we discuss the legislation regulating access to benefits in kind and cash, the legal definition of beneficiaries, the eligibility conditions applied for each type of benefit, and the period for which these benefits can be granted. Each case study also provides an assessment of the recent trends and directions in accessing social entitlements across the five policy areas of interest. [less ▲]

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See detailDiaspora Policies and Social Protection in Italy
Caldarini, Carlo; Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege

in Lafleur, Jean-Michel (Ed.) Migration and social protection in Europe and beyond: comparing consular services and diaspora policies (Volume 2) (2020)

According to some estimates, about 60 million people of Italian origin live outside of Italy today. To manage and, at first, encourage emigration, Italy has historically built a composite diaspora ... [more ▼]

According to some estimates, about 60 million people of Italian origin live outside of Italy today. To manage and, at first, encourage emigration, Italy has historically built a composite diaspora infrastructure which is discussed in the first part of this chapter. Doing so, we demonstrate that instruments to consult and represent politically citizens abroad are core features of Italy’s diaspora engagement policies. In the second part of this chapter, we examine the social protection dimension of diaspora more closely and highlight the central role played by the Patronati (welfare advice agencies). We show that Patronati are to this day a unique institution at international level, by which Italians abroad can be helped, free of charge, to gain access to social protection in Italy and abroad. [less ▲]

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See detailOns gemeenschappelijk huis. Migratie en ontwikkeling in België
Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege; Marfouk, Abdelslam ULiege; Kervyn, Elise et al

Report (2019)

Dit rapport biedt een diepgaande analyse van de huidige stand van zaken, het beleid en de debatten in België met betrekking tot migratie en ontwikkeling. Het behandelt de beschikbare kennis, bewijzen en ... [more ▼]

Dit rapport biedt een diepgaande analyse van de huidige stand van zaken, het beleid en de debatten in België met betrekking tot migratie en ontwikkeling. Het behandelt de beschikbare kennis, bewijzen en analyses om een antwoord te geven op de volgende vraag: Hoe, en onder welke voorwaarden, kunnen migranten bijdragen aan hun eigen integrale menselijke ontwikkeling en aan die van hun samenlevingen van herkomst en verblijf? [less ▲]

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See detailPenser une maison commune. Migration et développement en Belgique
Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege; Marfouk, Abdelslam ULiege; Verniers, Elisabeth et al

Report (2019)

Basé sur une étude approfondie des réalités, des politiques et des débats actuels en Belgique en matière de migration et de développement, ce rapport propose des pistes pour répondre à cette ... [more ▼]

Basé sur une étude approfondie des réalités, des politiques et des débats actuels en Belgique en matière de migration et de développement, ce rapport propose des pistes pour répondre à cette question fondamentale : Comment et dans quelles conditions les migrants peuvent-ils contribuer à leur propre épanouissement ainsi qu’au développement humain intégral de leurs pays de destination et d’origine ? [less ▲]

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See detailA common home. Migration and development in Belgium
Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege; Marfouk, Abdelslam ULiege; Devriendt, Tom et al

Report (2019)

Based on an in-depth analysis of current events, policies, and debates related to migration and development in Belgium, this report develops knowledge, evidence and analysis to answer the following ... [more ▼]

Based on an in-depth analysis of current events, policies, and debates related to migration and development in Belgium, this report develops knowledge, evidence and analysis to answer the following guiding question: How, and in what circumstances, can migrants contribute to their own integral human development, as well as that of their societies of origin and residence? [less ▲]

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See detailMigration and State Concerns about the Emigration & Welfare of their Citizens
Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege

in Inglis, Christine; Khadria, Binod; Li, Wei (Eds.) Sage Handbook of International Migration (2019)

This chapter discusses sending states’ concerns for the well-being of citizens abroad. Using the concept of transnationalism, I will first discuss the historical evolution of sending’s states involvement ... [more ▼]

This chapter discusses sending states’ concerns for the well-being of citizens abroad. Using the concept of transnationalism, I will first discuss the historical evolution of sending’s states involvement in emigration decisions and their relations with citizens residing abroad members of the diaspora. Second, focusing on a trend of the literature on “diaspora policies”, I will demonstrate that —while sending states most frequently develop economic and political programmes towards citizens— diaspora policies now increasingly include welfare. This, I argue in the third part of the chapter, contributes to transnationalization of welfare. Developing the concept of transnational social protection from below and from above, I show that immigrants’ access to social protection goes beyond welfare policies adopted by receiving states but also include numerous sending states policies as well as informal strategies developed by immigrants together with market, community and family actors. Finally, this chapter concludes with a discussion on the implications of sending states involvements in expatriates’ welfare for future research on migration. [less ▲]

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See detailSouthern European Migration Towards Northern Europe
Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege; Stanek, Mikolaj

in IEMed (Ed.) IEMed Mediterranean Yearbook 2018 (2018)

In this article, we examine migration as one strategy used by Southern European EU citizens in reaction to the global financial and economic crisis. First of all, we will present the main sociodemographic ... [more ▼]

In this article, we examine migration as one strategy used by Southern European EU citizens in reaction to the global financial and economic crisis. First of all, we will present the main sociodemographic characteristics of these new migrants and demonstrate how they resemble or differ from preceding EU South-North migratory waves. Then we will discuss the political response adopted by southern and northern EU Member States in reaction to these new flows. And we will finish with a series of conclusions that this migratory episode allows us to reach regarding the EU’s management of migratory issues with third countries. [less ▲]

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See detailL’ULiège demain : 12 travaux pour la future équipe rectorale
Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege; Delvenne, Pierre ULiege

Diverse speeche and writing (2018)

Après deux tours d’élections rectorales n’ayant pas permis de dégager un consensus sur le futur leadership de notre institution, le moment est opportun pour relancer le débat d’idées sur l’avenir de ... [more ▼]

Après deux tours d’élections rectorales n’ayant pas permis de dégager un consensus sur le futur leadership de notre institution, le moment est opportun pour relancer le débat d’idées sur l’avenir de l’ULiège. En tant que chercheurs impliqués dans l’institution, mais n’appartenant à aucune équipe candidate à l’élection, nous souhaitons attirer l’attention de la communauté universitaire sur certains des défis qui nous semblent prioritaires pour le futur de notre institution universitaire. Nous ne prétendons en aucun cas à l’exhaustivité. Notre démarche se veut propositionnelle et non contestataire. Ce document ne peut être qu’un point de départ, qui reste forcément ancré dans les réalités de nos trajectoires professionnelles respectives. Notre objectif vise donc essentiellement à contribuer à un débat constructif sur l’avenir de notre institution. Nous espérons que cette base de travail sera élargie à de nouvelles idées et que chaque candidat(e) qui portera un projet pour l’ULiège demain aura à cœur de se prononcer par rapport à ces différents éléments. [less ▲]

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See detailMigratie in België in 21 vragen en antwoorden
Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege; Marfouk, Abdeslam; Fadil, Nadia

Book published by Leuven University Press (2018)

Hoeveel migranten zijn er in België? Waar komen ze vandaan? Zijn het overwegend mannen? Zijn ze geïntegreerd of bedreigen ze onze identiteit? Nemen ze jobs af van de Belgen of worden ze gediscrimineerd ... [more ▼]

Hoeveel migranten zijn er in België? Waar komen ze vandaan? Zijn het overwegend mannen? Zijn ze geïntegreerd of bedreigen ze onze identiteit? Nemen ze jobs af van de Belgen of worden ze gediscrimineerd? Wie bedoelt men met “mensen zonder papieren”? Is België gastvrijer dan andere landen? Mogen we onze grenzen sluiten? De meeste Belgen hebben wel een antwoord op dat soort vragen, maar vaak baseren ze zich op vooroordelen of foutieve informatie. Migratie in België in 21 vragen en antwoorden laat de clichés achterwege en geeft in een toegankelijke stijl een antwoord op 21 pertinente vragen rond migratie. Op basis van wetenschappelijke gegevens en helder cijfermateriaal geven de auteurs een evenwichtig en duidelijk antwoord. Kortom, dit boekje is een absolute aanrader voor wie zich een correcte mening wil vormen over dit brandend maatschappelijk onderwerp. [less ▲]

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See detailCan diasporas shape homeland health policies?
Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege

Conference (2018, April 26)

Across Europe and North America, controversies around the impact of immigration on the welfare state are recurring. Whether they are accused of being triggered to move by benefits or of being a burden on ... [more ▼]

Across Europe and North America, controversies around the impact of immigration on the welfare state are recurring. Whether they are accused of being triggered to move by benefits or of being a burden on public finance in destination countries, few countries manage to discuss welfare reforms without connecting it to immigration debates. In this paper, we show that the welfare and migration literature’s focus on those debates entails that immigrant agency is neglected in the study of welfare reform and so it's the immigrant impact on welfare state reform in the home country. Interpreting empirical data on the experience of two diasporas —Mexicans and Congolese— in homeland health policies, we build a conceptual framework that articulate migration and development and welfare reforms approaches in order to identify the variables that lead to the formal acknowledgement of the diaspora’s role in their homeland social protection policies. [less ▲]

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See detailAvoir un débat raisonné sur l’immigration
Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege

Article for general public (2018)

Dans leur livre disponible en téléchargement gratuit 1, Jean-Michel Lafleur et Abdeslam Marfouk, chercheurs au Centre d’études de l’ethnicité et des migrations de l’ULg, répondent à 21 questions que ... [more ▼]

Dans leur livre disponible en téléchargement gratuit 1, Jean-Michel Lafleur et Abdeslam Marfouk, chercheurs au Centre d’études de l’ethnicité et des migrations de l’ULg, répondent à 21 questions que se posent les Belges sur les migrations internationales au XXIe siècle. Vulgarisées avec l’utilisation de données scientifiques, leurs réponses font mouche. Loin des stéréotypes et de la stigmatisation. Rencontre avec Jean-Michel Lafleur. [less ▲]

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See detailRepresentación y participación política de población migrante en sus países de origen: ¿hacia una ciudadanía política exterior?
Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege

in Lafleur, Jean-Michel; Yépez del Castillo, Isabel; Herrera, Gioconda (Eds.) Migraciones internacionales en Bolivia y Ecuador: crisis global, Estado y desarrollo (2018)

En este artículo proponemos examinar el proceso que llevó a los Estados a otorgar el derecho de voto a su población en el extranjero, junto con el desarrollo de una serie de otros derechos cívicos y ... [more ▼]

En este artículo proponemos examinar el proceso que llevó a los Estados a otorgar el derecho de voto a su población en el extranjero, junto con el desarrollo de una serie de otros derechos cívicos y políticos. Con este objetivo, describimos inicial- mente la evolución de los vínculos entre los migrantes y los países de origen y desarrollamos, en la primera parte del artículo, el concepto de ciudadanía política externa, que definimos como un estatus legal y un conjunto de prácticas por medio de las cuales los migrantes pueden participar en la vida política de dos Estados, sin tener que elegir entre ellos. Como veremos, la ciudadanía política externa comprende tres dimensiones: consulta, representación y participación, cada una de las cuales ha sufrido importantes cambios a nivel internacional durante las tres últimas décadas. En la segunda parte del artículo examinaremos las interacciones entre la ciudadanía política externa y la ciudadanía de los migrantes en los países de residencia. En concreto, nos centraremos en las interacciones entre la participación política de los migrantes en su país de residencia y su país de origen. [less ▲]

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See detailIntroducción: Migraciones andinas, desarrollo y transformación social
Herrera, Gioconda; Lafleur, Jean-Michel ULiege; Yépez del Castillo, Isabel

in Herrera, Gioconda; Lafleur, Jean-Michel; Yépez del Castillo, Isabel (Eds.) Migraciones internacionales en Bolivia y Ecuador: crisis global, Estado y desarrollo (2018)

Tres procesos, que describimos a continuación, definen nuestro lugar de enunciación. Empezamos por caracterizar a las migraciones andinas y su relación con el discurso sobre migración y desarrollo en ... [more ▼]

Tres procesos, que describimos a continuación, definen nuestro lugar de enunciación. Empezamos por caracterizar a las migraciones andinas y su relación con el discurso sobre migración y desarrollo en la región; luego presentamos algunos elementos sobre la crisis global y su impacto sobre las migraciones; finalmente examinamos la evolución de las políticas de la Unión Europea (UE) y su repercusión en los procesos migratorios de la región. [less ▲]

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