References of "Kishimoto, M"
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See detailPlanet formation imager: Project update
Monnier, J. D.; Ireland, M.; Kraus, S. et al

in Proceedings of SPIE: The International Society for Optical Engineering (2018, July 01), 10701

The Planet Formation Imager (PFI) is a near- and mid-infrared interferometer project with the driving science goal of imaging directly the key stages of planet formation, including the young proto-planets ... [more ▼]

The Planet Formation Imager (PFI) is a near- and mid-infrared interferometer project with the driving science goal of imaging directly the key stages of planet formation, including the young proto-planets themselves. Here, we will present an update on the work of the Science Working Group (SWG), including new simulations of dust structures during the assembly phase of planet formation and quantitative detection efficiencies for accreting and non-accreting young exoplanets as a function of mass and age. We use these results to motivate two reference PFI designs consisting of a) twelve 3m telescopes with a maximum baseline of 1.2km focused on young exoplanet imaging and b) twelve 8m telescopes optimized for a wider range of young exoplanets and protoplanetary disk imaging out to the 150K H2O ice line. Armed with 4 x 8m telescopes, the ESO/VLTI can already detect young exoplanets in principle and projects such as MATISSE, Hi-5 and Heimdallr are important PFI pathfinders to make this possible. We also discuss the state of technology development needed to make PFI more affordable, including progress towards new designs for inexpensive, small field-of-view, large aperture telescopes and prospects for Cubesat-based space interferometry. © 2018 SPIE. [less ▲]

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See detailA recent history of science cases for interferometry
Defrere, Denis ULiege; Aerts, C.; Kishimoto, M. et al

in Experimental Astronomy (2018), 1801

Optical long-baseline interferometry is a unique and powerful technique for astronomical research. Since 2004, optical interferometers have produced an increasing number of scientific papers covering ... [more ▼]

Optical long-baseline interferometry is a unique and powerful technique for astronomical research. Since 2004, optical interferometers have produced an increasing number of scientific papers covering various fields of astrophysics. As current interferometric facilities are reaching their maturity, we take the opportunity in this paper to summarize the conclusions of a few key meetings, workshops, and conferences dedicated to interferometry. We present the most persistent recommendations related to science cases and discuss some key technological developments required to address them. In the era of extremely large telescopes, optical long-baseline interferometers will remain crucial to probe the smallest spatial scales and make breakthrough discoveries. [less ▲]

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See detailPlanet Formation Imager (PFI): Science vision and key requirements
Kraus, S.; Monnier, J. D.; Ireland, M. J. et al

in Proceedings of SPIE: The International Society for Optical Engineering (2016)

The Planet Formation Imager (PFI) project aims to provide a strong scientific vision for ground-based optical astronomy beyond the upcoming generation of Extremely Large Telescopes. We make the case that ... [more ▼]

The Planet Formation Imager (PFI) project aims to provide a strong scientific vision for ground-based optical astronomy beyond the upcoming generation of Extremely Large Telescopes. We make the case that a breakthrough in angular resolution imaging capabilities is required in order to unravel the processes involved in planet formation. PFI will be optimised to provide a complete census of the protoplanet population at all stellocentric radii and over the age range from 0.1 to ∼100 Myr. Within this age period, planetary systems undergo dramatic changes and the final architecture of planetary systems is determined. Our goal is to study the planetary birth on the natural spatial scale where the material is assembled, which is the "Hill Sphere" of the forming planet, and to characterise the protoplanetary cores by measuring their masses and physical properties. Our science working group has investigated the observational characteristics of these young protoplanets as well as the migration mechanisms that might alter the system architecture. We simulated the imprints that the planets leave in the disk and study how PFI could revolutionise areas ranging from exoplanet to extragalactic science. In this contribution we outline the key science drivers of PFI and discuss the requirements that will guide the technology choices, the site selection, and potential science/technology tradeoffs. © 2016 SPIE. [less ▲]

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See detailMid-infrared microlensing of accretion disc and dusty torus in quasars: effects on flux ratio anomalies
Sluse, Dominique ULiege; Kishimoto, M.; Anguita, T. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2013), 553

Multiply-imaged quasars and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) observed in the mid-infrared (MIR) range are commonly assumed to be unaffected by the microlensing produced by the stars in their lensing galaxy ... [more ▼]

Multiply-imaged quasars and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) observed in the mid-infrared (MIR) range are commonly assumed to be unaffected by the microlensing produced by the stars in their lensing galaxy. In this paper, we investigate the validity domain of this assumption. Indeed, that premise disregards microlensing of the accretion disc in the MIR range, and does not account for recent progress in our knowledge of the dusty torus, which has unveiled relatively compact dust emission. To simulate microlensing, we first built a simplified image of the quasar composed of (i) an accretion disc whose size is based on accretion disc theory, and (ii) a larger ring-like torus whose radius is guided by interferometric measurements in nearby AGNs. The mock quasars are created in the 10[SUP]44.2[/SUP]-10[SUP]46[/SUP] erg/s (unlensed) luminosity range, which is typical of known lensed quasars, and are then microlensed using an inverse ray-shooting code. We simulated the wavelength dependence of microlensing for different lensed image types and for various fractions of compact objects in the lens. This allows us to derive magnification probabilities as a function of wavelength, as well as to calculate the microlensing-induced deformation of the spectral energy distribution of the lensed images. We find that microlensing variations as large as 0.1 mag are very common at 11 μm (typically rest-frame 4 μm). The main signal comes from microlensing of the accretion disc, which may be significant even when the fraction of flux from the disc is as small as 5% of the total flux. We also show that the torus of sources with L[SUB]bol[/SUB] ≲ 10[SUP]45[/SUP] erg/s is expected to be noticeably microlensed. Microlensing may thus be used to get insight into the rest near-infrared inner structure of AGNs. Finally, we investigate whether microlensing in the mid-infrared can alter the so-called R[SUB]cusp[/SUB] relation that links the fluxes of the lensed images triplet produced when the source lies close to a cusp macro-caustic. This relation is commonly used to identify massive (dark-matter) substructures in lensing galaxies. We find that significant deviations from R[SUB]cusp[/SUB] may be expected, which means that microlensing can explain part of the flux ratio problem. Microlensing maps and source profiles used for our simulations are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to <A href="http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr>cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr</A> (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via <a href=">http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/553/A53</A> [less ▲]

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