References of "Kaisin, Olivier"
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See detailSpontaneous Tool Use by a Wild Black Lion Tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysopygus)
Kaisin, Olivier ULiege; Amaral, Rodrigo; Bufalo, Felipe et al

in International Journal of Primatology (2020)

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See detailPhysiological and behavioural responses to habitat fragmentation by black lion tamarins
Kaisin, Olivier ULiege; Culot, Laurence ULiege; Poncin, Pascal ULiege et al

Conference (2018, November 13)

Habitat fragmentation is one of the major threats hanging over primate populations in South America. Before affecting primates at a population level, environmental perturbations affect the physiology of ... [more ▼]

Habitat fragmentation is one of the major threats hanging over primate populations in South America. Before affecting primates at a population level, environmental perturbations affect the physiology of the individuals. Glucocorticoids (GCs), often referred to as stress hormones, are metabolic hormones which mediate the energetic demands needed to overcome predictable and unpredictable environmental and social challenges. These physiological biomarkers play a key role in enabling individuals to respond to stressors and restore physiological homeostasis. How primates adapt to habitat fragmentation pressures remains poorly understood. The aim of this research is to investigate the physiological and behavioural responses of the endangered black lion tamarins (Leontopithecus chrysopygus) living in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest, a habitat particularly affected by fragmentation. The three specific objectives of this research are: (1) reviewing the effect of anthropogenic habitat disturbance on the well-being of primates, (2) analysing variation in chronic stress of tamarins in different forest fragment quality, and (3) relating transient stress levels to behavioural patterns. The first objective will consist of an extensive bibliographic research to identify how habitat disturbance variables affect primate well-being. Regarding physiological markers, we will use two different matrixes to measure GC concentrations. First, GC levels in hair samples (hair cortisol concentrations-HCC) will provide us with information on long term adrenocortical activity, recounting the animal’s chronic stress levels. Second, faecal GC levels will inform us about short term exposure to stress unfolding the animal’s daily fluctuations. Consequently, to approach the second objective, we will compare habitat quality with the HCCs of six tamarin groups living in fragments of different quality. For the third objective, we will compare faecal GC levels with behaviour patterns collected during daily follow-ups of three tamarin groups. This project will be conducted as a joint-PhD between ULiège and the Sao Paulo State University (Brazil). Evaluating stress levels in primate populations living in fragmented landscapes can shed light on how primates respond to such habitat perturbations and how significant it is for their survival. [less ▲]

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See detailForaging strategies underlying bird egg predation by macaques: A study using artificial nests
Kaisin, Olivier ULiege; Gazagne, Eva ULiege; Savini, Tommaso ULiege et al

in American Journal of Primatology (2018), 80(11),

Bird egg predation is widespread in non-human primates. Although nest predation is often described as opportunistic, little is known about foraging strategies and nest detection in primates. Since it is ... [more ▼]

Bird egg predation is widespread in non-human primates. Although nest predation is often described as opportunistic, little is known about foraging strategies and nest detection in primates. Since it is the prevalent cause of nest failure in the tropics, birds select nest sites within specific microhabitats and use different nest types to increase nesting success. Identifying the nests targeted by the northern pigtailed macaques (Macaca leonina), an omnivorous cercopithecine species, and known nest predator, will shine light on nest foraging strategies in primates. The aim of this research was to reveal if nest predation is a selective or opportunistic feeding behavior. We studied, using artificial nests and camera traps, the influence of nest type (open-cup vs. cavity), microhabitat (i.e., understory density, canopy cover, canopy height, ground cover, and presence vs. absence of thorns and lianas), and nest height, on nest predation by a troop of northern pigtailed macaques in the Sakaerat Biosphere Reserve (Thailand), a degraded environment. In our study, macaque predation on artificial nests was high; out of the200nests thatwereset up, 112were plunderedbymacaques. Althoughpredation ratesdecreasedwithnest height,nest type,andmicrohabitathadnosignificant effecton predation by macaques. Nest detectability and accessibility did not affect predation rates. Macaques actively searched for nests in different microhabitats, suggesting that nest predation by this primate might be considered a selective feeding behavior in this degraded habitat. Consequently, nest predation by this primate might have important conservation implications on the population dynamics of forest-dwelling bird species. Behavior observation methods, such as instantaneous scan sampling, may underesti- mate nest predation by primates, a furtive and cryptic behavior. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (28 ULiège)