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See detailAstin C production by the endophytic fungus Cyanodermella asteris in planktonic and immobilized culture conditions
Vassaux, Antoine ULiege; Tarayre, Cédric; Arguelles Arias, Anthony ULiege et al

in Biotechnology Journal (2019)

The fungal endophyte Cyanodermella asteris was recently isolated from the medicinal plant Aster tataricus. This fungus produces astin C, a cyclic pentapeptide with anticancer and anti-inflammatory ... [more ▼]

The fungal endophyte Cyanodermella asteris was recently isolated from the medicinal plant Aster tataricus. This fungus produces astin C, a cyclic pentapeptide with anticancer and anti-inflammatory properties. The production of this secondary metabolite was compared in immobilized and planktonic conditions. For immobilized cultures, a stainless steel packing immersed in the culture broth was used as a support. In these conditions, the fungus exclusively grew on the packing, which provides a considerable advantage for astin C recovery and purification. C. asteris metabolism was different according to the culture conditions in terms of substrate consumption rate, cell-growth, and astin C production. Immobilized-cell cultures yielded a 30% increase of astin C production associate to a 39% increase in biomass. The inoculum type as spores rather than hyphae, and a pre-inoculation washing procedure with sodium hydroxide, turned out to be beneficial both for astin C production and fungus development onto the support. Finally, influence of culture parameters such as pH and medium composition, on astin C production was evaluated. With optimized culture conditions, astin C yield was further improved reaching a five times higher final specific yield compared to the value reported with astin C extraction from Aster tataricus (0.89 and 0.16 mg/g respectively). [less ▲]

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See detailBCCM/ULC: a collection of cyanobacteria linking Poles to Space
Wilmotte, Annick ULiege; Beets, Kim ULiege; Santoro, Mariano ULiege et al

Conference (2018, December 18)

The BCCM/ULC public collection funded by the Belgian Science Policy Office (BELSPO) aims to gather a representative portion of the cyanobacterial diversity with a focus on Polar biotopes (e.g. limnetic ... [more ▼]

The BCCM/ULC public collection funded by the Belgian Science Policy Office (BELSPO) aims to gather a representative portion of the cyanobacterial diversity with a focus on Polar biotopes (e.g. limnetic microbial mats, soil crusts, cryoconites, endolithes). It represents an exclusive Biological Resource Centre (BRC) where characterized polar cyanobacterial strains are available for researchers to study the taxonomy, biogeography, evolution, synthesis of secondary metabolites, adaptation to harsh environmental conditions, and genomic make-up. It currently holds 190 strains, including over 120 of Polar origin (online catalogue: http://bccm.belspo.be/catalogues/ulc-catalogue-search). Living cultures are regularly transferred, and the majority are also cryopreserved (as back-up), in order to assure their preservation and the rapid delivery of strains to clients for fundamental and applied research in both academia and industry. Genomic DNA is also available on request. The collection has obtained the ISO 9001:2015 certification for deposit and distribution of strains, as part of the multi-site certification for the Belgian Coordinated Collections of Microorganisms (BCCM) consortium. A polyphasic approach based on morphological and molecular identifications (based on SSU rRNA sequences) show that the strains belong to the Synechococcales, Oscillatoriales, Chroococcidiopsidales, Pleurocapsales, and Nostocales orders. This large diversity renders the BCCM/ULC collection particularly interesting for taxonomic, biogeographic and phylogenomic studies. Furthermore, the sequencing of the genomes of several strains has started. The BRC also aims to become a source for researchers to study further applications of cyanobacteria in astrobiology as shown by investigations of the resistance to desiccation and radiation of strains of Chroococcidiopsis sp. dominating rock-dwelling communities in extreme dry environments [1]. In paleontology, cyanobacteria represent model organisms thanks to their fundamental role in the oxygenation of the atmosphere and oceans during the Great Oxidation Event. Lastly, the mat-forming cyanobacterial strains may represent “critical organisms” in the investigation of the factors that determine the boundaries of microbial survival and growth on Earth and in the space environment, by virtue of the fact that they are components of microbial mat model systems which are more and more used to elucidate Earth’s past and the detection of life’s biosignatures. [less ▲]

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See detailThe BCCM/ULC collection of cyanobacteria in the spotlight at ULiège
Santoro, Mariano ULiege; Beets, Kim ULiege; Simons, Véronique et al

Poster (2018, October 11)

The ULC public collection of cyanobacteria belongs since 2011 to the consortium of Belgian Co-Ordinated Collections of Microorganisms (BCCM). It aims to conserve ‘ex situ’ a representative portion of the ... [more ▼]

The ULC public collection of cyanobacteria belongs since 2011 to the consortium of Belgian Co-Ordinated Collections of Microorganisms (BCCM). It aims to conserve ‘ex situ’ a representative portion of the biodiversity of cyanobacterial diversity of different origins, with a focus on Antarctic and Artic cyanobacteria isolated from terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. BCCM/ULC currently holds 174 cyanobacterial strains that are available for researchers who study taxonomy, evolution, biogeography and the adaptation to harsh environmental conditions. The strains are identified by morphology and molecular characterization (based on rRNA sequences) and belong to the Synechococcales, Oscillatoriales, Pleurocapsales, Chroococcidiopsidales and Nostocales orders. This large taxonomic distribution renders it a suitable reference point for phylogenomic and genomic make-up studies. Regular transfer of living cultures ensures the conservation of strains, whose majority are also cryopreserved in order to limit the genetic drift. BCCM/ULC obtained an ISO 9001:2015 certification for public and safe deposits, and for distribution of living strains and genomic DNA. The BCCM policy continuously aims to guarantee a safe fit-for-use microbiological material and data compliant with the rules on access and utilization of the Nagoya Protocol. In addition, BCCM/ULC provides, to clients from academia & industry, a service of morphological identification and molecular characterization, along with other scientific services as tailor-made trainings and collaborations. The public collection is progressively enriched by public deposits from other geographical areas and by incorporating the most interesting strains from the research collection of the host laboratory. The latter is also involved in the valorisation of the collection and collaborations, aiming to study the molecular mechanisms of adaptation to cold stress in polar strains, their production of potential bioactive compounds, to decipher and analyze their genomes and to determine the usefulness of their pigments as ‘traces of life’ in astrobiology. [less ▲]

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See detailLes Cyanobactéries, microscopiques mais fondamentales !
Javaux, Emmanuelle ULiege; Jacques, Philippe ULiege; Wilmotte, Annick ULiege

Scientific conference (2018, September 26)

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See detailMorphological differences between aerial and submerged sporidia of bio-fongicide Pseudozyma flocculosa CBS 16788
Zaki, Omran ULiege; Weekers, Frederic; Compère, Philippe ULiege et al

in PLoS ONE (2018)

Pseudozyma flocculosa is a fungus very useful and highly efficient as a biocontrol agent against powdery mildew. The reproduction of this fungus occurs exclusively by asexual production of conidia or ... [more ▼]

Pseudozyma flocculosa is a fungus very useful and highly efficient as a biocontrol agent against powdery mildew. The reproduction of this fungus occurs exclusively by asexual production of conidia or sporidia that are the most suitable form for agricultural use and seems to be the most resistant to storage conditions. Despite the advantages offered by P. flocculosa in biological control, the use of this fungus use remains largely limited compared to that of chemical fungicides, at least partly due to the difficulty to obtain sporidia resistant to adverse environmental stresses in submerged culture conditions. Under solid-state and submerged-state cultivation, P. flocculosa strain CBS 16788 produced different types of sporidia. The submerged sporidia (SS) appeared relatively uniform in size, which was 15, 4 ± 1,6 μm μm long, and 2,8 ± 0.8 μm wide. The aerial sporidia (AS) varied in shape and size, with a mean length of 8,2 ± 3 μm and width of 2,3 ± 0.6 μm. Under scanning and transmission electron microscopy, the cell wall of submerged sporidia was thinner than that of aerial spores, and the surface was smooth in contrast to the aerial sporidia that had a tendency to have verrucous, brittle surface characteristics. The thickness of the aerial sporidia wall is due to the presence of an outer layer rich in melanin. The sporidia germination was compared on YMPD (yeast extract, malt extract, soy peptone, dextrose and agar) coated coverslips. The aerial sporidia did not show germ tubes until 5 h of incubation, while the submerged sporidia showed many germ tubes after the same time. The resistance against the adverse environmental conditions in relation to the type of sporidia of P. flocculosa is discussed [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional properties and health benefits of bioactive peptides derived from Spirulina : a review
Ovando, C.A.; De Carvalho, J.C.; Vinicius de Melo Pereira, G. et al

in Food Reviews International (2018)

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See detailCharacterisation of a secondary carotenoid producer microalga of the genus Coelastrella
Corato, Amélie ULiege; Franck, Fabrice ULiege; Jacques, Philippe ULiege

Poster (2017, September)

Some green microalgae synthesize secondary carotenoids as protecting agents under stress. These pigments have high value as feed supplement for aquaculture and as health products. The most promising ... [more ▼]

Some green microalgae synthesize secondary carotenoids as protecting agents under stress. These pigments have high value as feed supplement for aquaculture and as health products. The most promising pigment is astaxanthin, because of its antioxidant, antitumoral and anti-inflamatory properties. The most used natural source of this pigment is the microalga Haematococcus pluvialis. However this species grows slowly and lacks robustness for easy cultivation. Therefore, other species are investigated for astaxanthin production. Here, we identified a locally isolated strain as Coelastrella sp. that is a secondary carotenoid producer. [1] A known typical feature of this genus, that we could observed in the strain by scanning electron microcopy, is the presence of meridional ribs. [2] We analyzed the culture conditions and concluded that this strain grows both autotrophically and heterotrophically and is able of fast change in pigment composition under controlled stress conditions. Thanks to HPLC analyses, we determined that the strain accumulates a variety of secondary carotenoids, among which: astaxanthin, cantaxanthin and echinenone. Unidentified compounds will be further analyzed by mass spectrometry. [less ▲]

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See detailMicrobial lipopeptide production and purification bioprocesses, current progress and future challenges
Coutte, F.; Lecouturier, D.; Dimitrov, K. et al

in Biotechnology Journal (2017), 12(7),

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See detailGenetic engineering of the branched fatty acid metabolic pathway of Bacillus subtilis for the overproduction of surfactin C14 isoform
Dhali, D.; Coutte, F.; Arguelles Arias, Anthony ULiege et al

in Biotechnology Journal (2017), 12(7),

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See detailThe BCCM/ULC collection to conserve the biodiversity and study the secondary metabolites of Antarctic cyanobacteria
Lara, Yannick ULiege; Durieu, Benoit ULiege; Renard, Marine et al

in Van de Putte, Anton (Ed.) Book of abstracts: XIIth SCAR Biology Symposium, Leuven, Belgium, 10-14 July 2017. (2017, June)

The BCCM/ULC public collection is funded by the Belgian Science Policy Office since 2011. A Quality Management System ensures that the services of deposits (both public and safe) and distribution are well ... [more ▼]

The BCCM/ULC public collection is funded by the Belgian Science Policy Office since 2011. A Quality Management System ensures that the services of deposits (both public and safe) and distribution are well documented and efficient for the clients’ satisfaction. It has obtained the ISO 9001 certification for deposition and distribution of strains, as part of the multi-site certification for the BCCM consortium. This collection aims to gather a representative portion of the Antarctic cyanobacterial diversity with different ecological origins (limnetic mats, soil crusts, cryoconites, endoliths…) and make it available for researchers to study the taxonomy, evolution, adaptations to harsh environmental conditions, pigments, and genomic make-up. It presently includes 216 cyanobacterial strains, of which 119 are of Antarctic origin (catalogue: http://bccm.belspo.be/catalogues/ulc-catalogue-search). In addition, cyanobacteria are known to produce a wide range of secondary metabolites (e.g. alkaloids, cyclic and linear peptides, polyketides) with bioactive potential. Genome sequencing of 11 strains has been started to enable genome mining for biosynthetic clusters. Pair-read data from illumina MiSeq runs were obtained and submitted to a bioinformatic pipeline dedicated to the assembly of genomes and search of sequences involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Gene cluster prediction analysis allowed to characterize 20 clusters of NRPS, PKS and hybrid NRPS-PKS from 2 to 66kb. Surprisingly, none of the characterized operons had previously been described in the literature. [less ▲]

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See detailNonribosomal peptides and polyketides of Burkholderia: new compounds potentially implicated in biocontrol and pharmaceuticals
Esmaeel, Q.; Pupin, M.; Jacques, Philippe ULiege et al

in Environmental Science and Pollution Research (2017)

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See detailStudy of the correlation between fengycin promoter expression and its production by Bacillus subtilis under different culture conditions and the impact on surfactin production
Mejri, S.; Siah, A.; Coutte, F. et al

in Environmental Science and Pollution Research (2017)

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See detailProduction of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens OG and its metabolites in renewable media: valorisation for biodiesel production and p-xylene decontamination
Etchegaray, A.; Coutte, F.; Chataigné, G. et al

in Canadian Journal of Microbiology (2017), 63(1), 46-60

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See detailBiofilm formation is determinant in tomato rhizosphere colonization by Bacillus velezensis FZB42
Al-Ali, A.; Deravel, J.; Krier, F. et al

in Environmental Science and Pollution Research (2017)

In this work, the behavior in tomato rhizosphere of Bacillus velezensis FZB42 was analyzed taking into account the surfactin production, the use of tomato roots exudate as substrates, and the biofilm ... [more ▼]

In this work, the behavior in tomato rhizosphere of Bacillus velezensis FZB42 was analyzed taking into account the surfactin production, the use of tomato roots exudate as substrates, and the biofilm formation. B. velezensis FZB42 and B. amyloliquefaciens S499 have a similar capability to colonize tomato rhizosphere. Little difference in this colonization was observed with surfactin non producing B. velezensis FZB42 mutant strains. B. velezensis is able to grow in the presence of root exudate and used preferentially sucrose, maltose, glutamic, and malic acids as carbon sources. A mutant enable to produce exopolysaccharide (EPS-) was constructed to demonstrate the main importance of biofilm formation on rhizosphere colonization. This mutant had completely lost its ability to form biofilm whatever the substrate present in the culture medium and was unable to efficiently colonize tomato rhizosphere. © 2017 Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic and functional analyses of krs, a locus encoding kurstakin, a lipopeptide produced by Bacillus thuringiensis
Gélis-Jeanvoine, S.; Canette, A.; Gohar, M. et al

in Research in Microbiology (2017), 168(4), 356-368

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See detailEnhancement of Surfactin and Fengycin Production by Bacillus mojavensis A21: Application for Diesel Biodegradation
Hmidet, N.; Ben Ayed; Jacques, Philippe ULiege et al

in BioMed Research International (2017)

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See detailHigh-throughput strategies for the discovery and engineering of enzymes for biocatalysis(Review)
Jacques, Philippe ULiege; Béchet, M.; Bigan, M. et al

in Bioprocess and Biosystems Engineering (2017), 40(2), 161-180

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See detailIdentification and natural functions of cyclic lipopeptides from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens An6
Ben Ayed, H.; Hmidet, N.; Béchet, M. et al

in Engineering in Life Sciences (2017), 17(5), 536-544

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See detailHigh-throughput strategies for the discovery and engineering of enzymes for biocatalysis
Jacques, Philippe ULiege; Béchet, M.; Bigan, M. et al

in Bioprocess and Biosystems Engineering (2017), 40(2),

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (6 ULiège)