References of "Heylighen, Ann"
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See detailCité Miroir. Reflections on Disabled Persons’ Experience
Eisazadeh Otaghsaraei, Negin ULiege; Heylighen, Ann; Houbart, Claudine ULiege

Conference (2021)

Social and demographic changes in the 21st century turn an inclusive approach to built heritage into a necessity. Awareness is growing that human abilities and conditions are diverse, across both people ... [more ▼]

Social and demographic changes in the 21st century turn an inclusive approach to built heritage into a necessity. Awareness is growing that human abilities and conditions are diverse, across both people and the lifespan, while disability is increasingly understood as resulting from interaction with the designed environment. Acknowledging the challenges involved in reconnecting modern heritage with this contemporary reality, this paper focuses on the transformation of la Sauvenière, former public swimming pool and thermal baths, into Cité Miroir, a cultural space focusing on citizenship, memory, and dialogue. Located in the centre of Liège and registered as monument in Wallonia (Belgium), it is one of the sites featured in DOCOMOMO’s virtual exhibition of 19 “MoMo masterpieces” in Belgium. This building has been considered as one of the most important constructions of the interbellum modernist style and referred to as the “cathedral” of sports architecture in Wallonia. Designed in the Bauhaus style and inaugurated during the German occupation in 1942, it served as a public sports centre until being abandoned in 2000 due to non-compliance with safety standards. In 2014, after an extensive rehabilitation project, Cité Miroir was opened to public. Through conducting site visits with people living with diverse abilities and/or conditions, we build upon their unique expertise-by-experience to highlight spatial qualities that typically remain unobserved. By reporting on the preliminary findings of these field studies, we shift attention from the standardized human body as the source of proportion and measures for architecture to the human experience of space. [less ▲]

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See detailLearning from disabled people about qualities and obstacles in historic cities; The case of Liège
Eisazadeh, Negin ULiege; Heylighen, Ann; Houbart, Claudine ULiege

in 6th Unesco UNITWIN Conference 2019: Value of Heritage for Tourism, Leuven 8-12 April 2019 (2019, April)

The historic hearts of many European cities are famous touristic destinations which are sought after by various local and international visitors. However, the many restrictions and obstacles within the ... [more ▼]

The historic hearts of many European cities are famous touristic destinations which are sought after by various local and international visitors. However, the many restrictions and obstacles within the historic fabric limit the diversity of visitors who can access and benefit from these sites. Disabled people – i.e., those with sensory, mobility or mental abilities differing from the general public’s – are often inadvertently excluded from the touristic experience of historic cities. This exclusion from sharing the story of the past narrated through the historical architecture and urban spaces leads to further marginalization and disconnection from society. By contrast, opening up the historic built environment to a broader and more diverse audience facilitates their interaction not only with the past but also with other members of society while on par. This can potentially strengthen their connection to the heritage and additionally improve the link between people as a step towards more inclusive societies. In recent years there has been an increased interest in inclusive tourism resulting in multiple publications and conferences focused on this subject. Accessible historic city centres, in addition to having a positive impact on attracting a broad group of diverse visitors, ease the daily interaction of diverse residents. As part of a broader research which seeks to investigate the necessity, means and methods for adopting an inclusive approach in the conservation of historic built environment, this paper investigates the interaction of disabled people with the historic fabric of a European city, Liège. A person with an impairment who is confronted with disabling situations in their daily life has a unique expertise-by-experience, offering a fresh point of view in understanding the built environment that can lead to insights and solutions for creating spaces that are more suitable for all users. In the context of the historic urban space in Liège, collaborating with such diverse ‘user/experts’, in a bottom-up approach, this research attends to their experience and insights to identify the existing limitations and potentials. The city tour for each user/expert is planned based on a scenario and the routes by adapting the relevant tourist guide booklets of the Liège tourism office (Maison du Tourisme). The user/experts’ experience and statements regarding their visit and the researchers’ observation of this interaction reveal the qualities and obstacles that exist regarding opportunities for inclusive tourism in this historic city. Seeking to allow the broadest possible group of people to wander and navigate through the historic heart of a European city, this research is a step towards informing professional experts’ decisions for making the historic fabric more inclusive for residents and tourists. Such studies contribute to creating a knowledge and experience base which can gradually shift the prevalent commonly inadvertent exclusivity in the tourism practice to clear and consciously informed choices regarding inclusion that can improve the sense of belonging and attachment among residents and visitors. [less ▲]

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See detailHeritage for All: Rethinking the Relation of Built Heritage and Society in an Inclusive Conservation Approach
Eisazadeh, Negin ULiege; Heylighen, Ann; Houbart, Claudine ULiege

Conference (2018, June)

Built heritage is an integral part of contemporary historic cities and closely interwoven with people’s daily lives. Although people define, identify and designate specific architecture and urban spaces ... [more ▼]

Built heritage is an integral part of contemporary historic cities and closely interwoven with people’s daily lives. Although people define, identify and designate specific architecture and urban spaces as heritage, these sites communicate both the story of their past and the approach and intentions of the present, which together can shape people’s life today and even in the future. While acknowledging that the values perceived from heritage will vary based on the knowledge, abilities, and skills of diverse observers, today’s approach in the conservation of built heritage can impact on and potentially enrich the heritage values. The meeting of heritage places and people is vital for the continued existence of built heritage as it can lead to raising awareness of heritage and its values. In order to facilitate this meeting, in line with the integrated conservation of heritage and the inclusive approach adopted in the European Cultural Heritage Strategy for the 21st century, we investigate the implementation of an inclusive approach in conservation of built heritage. This approach aims to improve built heritage’s relation with society by limiting the disabling situations which disrupt one’s ability to engage with heritage and its values. This more open and potentially active presence of built heritage in its social context can strengthen the link between heritage and society and between individuals in society. To this end, we are conducting an extensive research which uses a bottom-up approach by attending to the experience and insights of disabled people in selected heritage sites to identify the existing limitations and potentials. These can inform a more inclusive conservation practice that seeks to balance protecting values with providing more enabling situations for engagement with heritage and its values. The subsequent interventions and modifications can add an extra layer to heritage, conveying today’s social conscious approach to future generations. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Potential of Digital Tools and Technologies in Architectural Heritage Research for an Inclusive Approach to Built Heritage
Eisazadeh, Negin ULiege; Houbart, Claudine ULiege; Hallot, Pierre ULiege et al

Conference (2017)

In recent years, inclusive design (a.k.a. universal design or design for all) is one of the developed approaches which aim to consider the diverse human abilities and conditions in the design process. As ... [more ▼]

In recent years, inclusive design (a.k.a. universal design or design for all) is one of the developed approaches which aim to consider the diverse human abilities and conditions in the design process. As defined by the European Institute for Design and Disability (EIDD) ‘design for all’ is designing for diversity, social inclusion and equality. Considering the social and demographic changes in the 21st century, which include an international movement towards social inclusion and more specifically the rights of disabled people, an inclusive approach is turning into a necessity for today’s diverse and ageing society. In the case of architectural and urban heritage, the disabled people or in better words those with diverse sensory, mental or mobility abilities who differ from the general public, have the right to experience, interact with, and engage with heritage and its values. As part of an extensive interdisciplinary research on inclusive approaches to built heritage values, which connects the fields of architecture, history, conservation, inclusive design, and digital humanities, this paper investigates the potentials of incorporating digital tools and techniques in the different aspects of this research. The extensive study involves communication between researchers, relevant professional experts, and the historic built environment with the target community of disabled people and in this paper, the digital means to facilitate these interactions have been studied. As a step towards answering the question ‘what are suitable methods and tools for facilitating and acquiring insight into diversely abled people’s engagement with and understanding of architectural heritage and its values?’, it more specifically focuses on the interaction of the disabled people with the historic architecture and urban spaces. Additionally, in a more general approach, by linking the fields of digital humanities and architectural research, the existing tools for the different stages of research ranging from data collection and storage, data analysis, and dissemination are explored. By conducting and elaborating relevant research examples, this study shows how incorporating digital tools and techniques derived from Digital Humanities - such as retrieving data through APIs, textual analysis, creating and querying databases, and data visualization - can facilitate research in the field of architecture and built heritage. Moreover, in studying the relation between disability and the historic built environment, it indicates that acquiring knowledge on the potentials in practical digital tools for disabled people’s interaction with the built heritage, can have a significant impact on the research approach and findings. As for an inclusive approach to built heritage, the disabled people can be taken into account with their prospective extended digital abilities. Hence in today’s digital world, integrating the digital tools and technologies in architectural heritage research is not only a necessary practical mean for conducting research, but can also impact the theoretical approach, allowing to carry out extensive and innovative research in an efficient manner. [less ▲]

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See detailWhom do architects have in mind during design when users are absent? Observations from a design competition
Verhulst, Lore; Elsen, Catherine ULiege; Heylighen, Ann

in Journal of Design Research (2016), 14(4), 368-387

As design processes become more complex, the distance between architects and their buildings’ users increases. In large-scale projects, future users often remain absent or hypothetic during design, and in ... [more ▼]

As design processes become more complex, the distance between architects and their buildings’ users increases. In large-scale projects, future users often remain absent or hypothetic during design, and in some design competitions, architects are not even allowed to interact with the client. This article considers whom architects design for in such a case, and how they imagine them. Through an in-depth case study of a real-world design process, it investigates what can be learned from what architects say about whom they have in mind during design. The findings reveal a gap between how users are considered in literature versus by the architects observed. Strikingly, the term ‘user’ is not used at all by the latter while corporeality seems to be largely absent in how they talk about whom they design for. These findings complete Kostof’s model of homunculi and contribute to a more nuanced understanding of whom architects have in mind when future users are absent or hypothetic. [less ▲]

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See detailRepresentations of sensory experiences in the early phases of architectural design: there is more than meets the eye
Elsen, Catherine ULiege; Heylighen, Ann

in Journal of Design Research (2014), 12(4), 239-259

In response to questions about designers’ visual way of knowing and working, this article explores how sensory experience is conveyed during the early phases of architectural design. By processing 985 ... [more ▼]

In response to questions about designers’ visual way of knowing and working, this article explores how sensory experience is conveyed during the early phases of architectural design. By processing 985 graphic components issued from a three-month ethnographic observation inside an architecture firm, and proposing an original methodology for their analysis, we identify and analyse graphic expressions of sensory-related design intentions. Multi-sensory dimensions of experiencing an architectural artefact, and the way architects deal with users experiencing space differently, are topics also considered in this article. The resulting observations remind us not to mistake apparent lack of graphical clues with lack of sensibility when it comes to addressing sensory experience during architectural design. [less ▲]

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See detailDesigning together - CAADFutures 2011
Leclercq, Pierre ULiege; Heylighen, Ann; Martin, Geneviève

Book published by Éditions de l'Université de Liège (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 66 (7 ULiège)