References of "Hardy, Olivier"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRemoval and predation of aril-covered seeds: the case of Afzelia bipindensis (Fabaceae - Detarioidae)
Evrard, Quentin ULiege; Hardy, Olivier; Tagg, Nikki et al

in Plant Ecology and Evolution (2019)

Background and aims – Most tree species with aril-covered seeds are assumed to be dispersed by frugivores. However, the number of studied African rainforest plant species remains low. This study focused ... [more ▼]

Background and aims – Most tree species with aril-covered seeds are assumed to be dispersed by frugivores. However, the number of studied African rainforest plant species remains low. This study focused on Afzelia bipindensis, an important timber species, which produces seeds partly covered by an aril. Specifically, this study aimed to: (1) identify the dispersers and the predators of A. bipindensis seeds, (2) characterize the role of those dispersers and predators in the regeneration process, and (3) understand the role of the aril in seed germination in relation to the feeding behaviour of the identified dispersers. Methods – The study took place in a Gabonese evergreen rainforest in 2015 and in a Cameroonian semideciduous rainforest in 2016 and 2017. We conducted more than 100 hours of direct observations, and used camera traps to monitor animal activities for 3000 hours within the canopy and 10 000 hours on the ground under fruiting trees. Key results – Three rodent taxa (Cricetomys emini, Funisciurus isabella and an undetermined species of Muridae) were mainly observed interacting with the seeds but neither birds nor monkeys were observed. Rodents removed more than 90% of the seeds, after detaching the aril, to probably cache them in burrows or superficial caches. Seeds from which we manually removed the aril (mimicking rodent behaviour) had a higher germination rate. Conclusions – Rodents may play a more important role than expected in the dynamics of tree species producing aril-covered seeds. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (8 ULiège)
See detailSimulating last glacial and postglacial distributions of African tropical trees with a dynamic vegetation model.
Dury, Marie ULiege; Henrot, Alexandra-Jane ULiege; Lézine, Anne-Marie et al

Conference (2018, August 16)

Climate change and human pressure threaten species richness of African tropical forests. Understanding how the past climate changes have shaped the current distribution and composition of African ... [more ▼]

Climate change and human pressure threaten species richness of African tropical forests. Understanding how the past climate changes have shaped the current distribution and composition of African rainforests can certainly help to the ecosystem conservation in the future. This topic is addressed in the framework of the multi-disciplinary AFRIFORD project (Genetic and palaeoecological signatures of African rainforest dynamics: pre-adapted to change?, http://www.ulb.ac.be/facs/sciences/afriford/). In parallel to genetic and palynological analyses, the CARAIB dynamic vegetation model is applied at the level of African tropical plant species to simulate change in their distributions from the Last Glacial Maximum (21,000 years BP) to the present in sub-Saharan Africa. We prepared a set of about a hundred species, mostly composed of tropical tree species (evergreen/deciduous, cool/warm taxa) for which we compiled observed occurrence data (e.g.., RAINBIO database), determined climatic requirements and gathered some specific traits (e.g., TRY database). From LGM to present time, the vegetation model is forced with the 1-kyr snapshot outputs of the HadCM3 climate model. Statistically downscaled at a spatial resolution of 0.5°, we only kept modelled past anomalies that we added to the GSWP3 (20 CR) climate data chosen as the reference for the historical period. Sub-Saharan simulations are performed with CARAIB forced by these climatic projections to simulate the net primary productivity of the species over time and space. We analyse the modelled changes in tropical forest composition and extension as well as in the distribution of individual species whose glacial refugia and postglacial dynamics remain poorly known. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 86 (9 ULiège)
See detailSimulating seed dispersal to reproduce past dynamics and distribution of African tropical trees.
Dury, Marie ULiege; Hardy, Olivier; Migliore, Jérémy et al

Poster (2018, March 28)

Climate change and human pressure threaten species richness of African tropical forests. Understanding how the past climate changes have shaped the current distribution and composition of African ... [more ▼]

Climate change and human pressure threaten species richness of African tropical forests. Understanding how the past climate changes have shaped the current distribution and composition of African rainforests can certainly help to the ecosystem conservation in the future. In the framework of the multi-disciplinary AFRIFORD project (Genetic and palaeoecological signatures of African rainforest dynamics: pre-adapted to change?, http://www.ulb.ac.be/facs/sciences/afriford/), this kind of questions is addressed. The CARAIB dynamic vegetation model is applied at the level of representative African tropical tree species to reconstruct their past and present distributions in equatorial Africa. To reproduce fully population dynamics, the results of the vegetation model are combined with a seed dispersal model. At first, we simulate with the CARAIB DVM the changes over time in the potential distribution of the tree species studied in AFRIFORD taking competition between species into account. From Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to present time, the vegetation model is forced with the 1-kyr snapshot outputs of the HadCM3 climate model, statistically downscaled at a spatial resolution of 0.5° and bias-corrected. The calculated distributions are essentially in equilibrium with climate, except for small delay times associated with biomass growth. These distributions are also compared directly with the potential (no dispersal limitation either) distributions obtained from species distribution modelling (MaxENT) for the same set of tree species and with the same climate forcing. Then, to simulate tree species under limitation by both climate and seed dispersal, the dispersal module is run transiently on a sub-grid at 100 m resolution to reproduce species dynamics over the 20,000 years from their LGM refugia (simulated by the DVM). The dispersal capacities are dependent on species productivity and survival simulated by the DVM for each1-kyr snapshot. The modelled dispersal distances are compared to genetic-based dispersal distances estimated in the project. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 56 (4 ULiège)
See detailDistribution of Podocarpus latifolius/milanjianus from the Last Glacial Maximum to 2100 in Africa with the dynamic vegetation model CARAIB.
Dury, Marie ULiege; Henrot, Alexandra-Jane ULiege; Lézine, Anne-Marie et al

Conference (2018, March 27)

Podocarpus latifolius/milanjianus (same species according to genetics) is an endemic African species with populations in the western, eastern and southern parts of the continent. The current global ... [more ▼]

Podocarpus latifolius/milanjianus (same species according to genetics) is an endemic African species with populations in the western, eastern and southern parts of the continent. The current global warming threatens the conservation of the relict patches of this mountain evergreen species. During the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), the species was certainly more largely distributed and present at lower elevations than today according to pollen data. At the beginning of the Holocene, Podocarpus moved upwards due to warmer conditions. The size of the populations might have collapsed abruptly at the end of the ”African Humid Period” at ca. 3,000 BP. Besides this general evolution, the palaeo-distribution of Podocarpus remains relatively unknown. The origin and connections between the eastern, southern and western Podocarpus forests are still not understood. In the framework of two related projects, AFRIFORD and VULPES, we use the CARAIB dynamic vegetation model, in parallel to genetic and palynologic analyses, to simulate the past and future dynamics of Podocarpus and to understand its current distribution. Projections of the HadCM3 climate model are used to reproduce climatic conditions in Africa from LGM (21,000 BP) to present time with a temporal resolution of 1 kyr. For the future (until 2100), several IPCC CMIP5 climate scenarios have been selected according to the quality of their reconstructed climate (temperature and precipitation) over sub-Saharan Africa for historical period. After interpolation to a 0.5° regular grid, we kept only past/future anomalies that we added to the GSWP3 (20 CR) climate data chosen as the reference for the historical period. Sub-continental simulations are performed with CARAIB forced by these climatic projections to simulate the net primary productivity of Podocarpus over time and space. In addition, CARAIB simulations are performed at higher resolution over a restricted region in southwestern Cameroon to identify potential microrefugia. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 82 (5 ULiège)
See detailModelling past and present distributions of tropical African biomes and species using a dynamic vegetation model.
Dury, Marie ULiege; Doutreloup, Sébastien ULiege; Hardy, Olivier et al

Poster (2017, February 08)

In the framework of the AFRIFORD project (Genetic and paleoecological signatures of African rainforest dynamics: pre-adapted to change?, http://www.ulb.ac.be/facs/sciences/afriford/), we used the CARAIB ... [more ▼]

In the framework of the AFRIFORD project (Genetic and paleoecological signatures of African rainforest dynamics: pre-adapted to change?, http://www.ulb.ac.be/facs/sciences/afriford/), we used the CARAIB dynamic vegetation model to simulate past and present distributions of tropical African vegetation at the biome and species levels to better project and understand future dynamics. We studied individual species (e.g., Afzelia africana, Pericopsis elata, etc) for which we determined climatic requirements and gathered specific traits. To perform palaeovegetation reconstructions, we used outputs of snapshot climate simulations (e.g., CNRM-CM5, FGOALS-g2 and MRI-CGCM5 global climatic models) from the PaleoModelling Intercomparison Project (PMIP3, https://pmip3.lsce.ipsl.fr/) for the mid-Holocene (6 ka) and the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 21 ka). These global climatic outputs were downscaled at a 0.45° spatial resolution over Equatorial Africa using the MAR regional climate model (RCM). For current conditions, the RCM was nested in different historical climate datasets. We compared modelled species distributions with species occurrences from different databases for present and with palaeorecords for past periods. MAR regional climate simulations notably allow CARAIB to reproduce the Dahomey Gap separating the Upper and Lower Guinean forests in West Africa in present biome distribution. The vegetation model also simulates LGM rainforest distribution in agreement with hypothetical glacial rainforest refuge areas inferred from palaeorecords. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (3 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvolution in African tropical trees displaying ploidy-habitat association: The genus Afzelia (Leguminosae)
Donkpegan, Segbedji ULiege; Doucet, Jean-Louis ULiege; Migliore, Jérémy et al

in Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution (2016)

Polyploidy has rarely been documented in rain forest trees but it has recently been found in African species of the genus Afzelia (Leguminosae), which is composed of four tetraploid rain forest species ... [more ▼]

Polyploidy has rarely been documented in rain forest trees but it has recently been found in African species of the genus Afzelia (Leguminosae), which is composed of four tetraploid rain forest species and two diploid dry forest species. The genus Afzelia thus provides an opportunity to examine how and when polyploidy and habitat shift occurred in Africa, and whether they are associated. In this study, we combined three plastid markers (psbA, trnL, ndhF), two nuclear markers (ribosomal ITS and the single-copy PEPC E7 gene), plastomes (obtained by High Throughput Sequencing) and morphological traits, with an extensive taxonomic and geographic sampling to explore the evolutionary history of Afzelia. Both nuclear DNA and morphological vegetative characters separated diploid from tetraploid lineages. Although the two African diploid species were well differentiated genetically and morphologically, the relationships among the tetraploid species were not resolved. In contrast to the nuclear markers, plastid markers revealed that one of the diploid species forms a well-supported clade with the tetraploids, suggesting historical hybridisation, possibly in relation with genome duplication (polyploidization) and habitat shift from dry to rain forests. Molecular dating based on fossil-anchored gene phylogenies indicates that extant Afzelia started diverging c. 14.5 or 20 Ma while extant tetraploid species started diverging c. 7.0 or 9.4 Ma according to plastid and nuclear DNA, respectively. Additional studies of tropical polyploid plants are needed to assess whether the ploidy-habitat association observed in African Afzelia would reflect a role of polyploidization in niche divergence in the tropics. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (3 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailAssessment of fine scale population genetic diversity and regeneration in Congo basin logged forests
Evrard, Quentin ULiege; Daïnou, Kasso ULiege; Hardy, Olivier et al

Poster (2016, June)

Background In the Congo Basin most of the light-demanding timber tree species display a deficit of natural regeneration which is a major handicap for sustainable production and certification. Whilst the ... [more ▼]

Background In the Congo Basin most of the light-demanding timber tree species display a deficit of natural regeneration which is a major handicap for sustainable production and certification. Whilst the majority of scientists investigate abiotic and biotic factors explaining that pattern, we hypothesize that tree population density or individual spatial isolation may also affect the tree fitness through inbreeding. In this study, we integrate ecological and genetic approaches to characterize the regeneration potential of a set of priority timber species by (i) estimating pollen dispersal distances at various tree population densities, and (ii) evaluating the impact of increasing spatial isolation on mating characteristics and tree fitness. The ultimate goal is the proposal of minimum population density that prevents inbreeding consequences. Method This ongoing study focuses on 10 timber species (Pericopsis elata, Milicia excelsa, Baillonella toxisperma, Entandrophragma cylindricum, E. utile, E. angolense, E. candollei, Afzelia bipindensis, Erythrophleum suaveloens, Terminalia superba). The data collection was carried out in the logging concession granted to Pallisco in Cameroon. We established two 400-ha plots, where all individuals (DBH > 10 cm) of the target species were inventoried and mapped. A sample of leave or cambium was collected for each of these individuals, as well as for seedlings to characterize patterns of gene flow using genetic tools (nuclear microsatellites). Dispersal agents were identified by direct observations and camera traps. Germination success was characterized in nursery for seeds collected on trees under an increasing isolation gradient. Results Main dispersal agents (wind, bat, rodent) and predators (rodent) were identified for all the species. The gene flow and germination data is still being analyzed and the main results will be presented in the poster. Conclusion Our data will allow characterizing the reproductive biology of a set of important timber species from the Congo basin. These information will strengthen sustainable forest management and the application of certification by adjusting harvesting norms through the use of scientifically-relevant data. In particular, we will tentatively define a maximum distance to be maintained between two adults to allow a qualitative reproduction. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (10 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailLate-Holocene tropical moist-forests of southeastern Cameroon: some insight from soil charcoal analysis
Morin, Julie ULiege; Biwolé, Achille; Bourland, Nils et al

Conference (2015, August)

Tropical forests of Central Africa constitute the second most important block of moist forest of the world. Little is known, however, about past vegetation in this region that remains underexplored ... [more ▼]

Tropical forests of Central Africa constitute the second most important block of moist forest of the world. Little is known, however, about past vegetation in this region that remains underexplored (Vleminckx et al. 2014; Morin-Rivat et al. 2014). Determining the past specific composition of these forests could allow bringing insights into their evolution over time and providing data about their resilience capacity facing global change. We performed a pedoanthracological analysis in the semi-deciduous forests of southeastern Cameroon. We excavated 53 test pits of 53 50 × 50 × 60 cm in plots of botanical inventory along a NS 80-km long mega-transect that followed a vegetation gradient. We sorted and quantified charred macrobotanical remains by layers of 10 cm, then identified species from wood charcoals. We used the InsideWood database, implemented with 163 new anatomical descriptions of woods present in the study area by using the reference collection of African woods of the Royal Museum for Central Africa (Belgium). Finally, we obtained 25 radiocarbon dates on charcoals and oil palm endocarps. Results showed that repeated fire events occurred across the study area during the last 2500 years, soon after the well-documented “rainforest crisis” (e.g. Lézine et al. 2013). The analyzed charcoals are likely human-induced regarding evidence of associated human settlements (e.g. potsherds). Aged were distributed into two time periods: the Early Iron Age (2300-1300 BP) and the Late Iron Age (700-100 BP) with an intermediate hiatus in human occupation (see e.g. Wotzka 2006; Morin-Rivat et al. 2014). Specific composition during both periods did not strongly differ from current composition, which is now dominated by light-demanding canopy trees belonging to old-growth semi-deciduous Celtis forests (Gond et al. 2013; Fayolle et al. 2014). This argues in favor of the maintenance of light-demanding tree species by anthropogenic activities, such as slash-and-burn shifting cultivation. We conclude that moist forests have a good resilience capacity regarding moderate and scattered disturbances. These forests can nonetheless be deeply impacted by land-use intensification (e.g. degraded forests along roads and close to cities; Gond et al. 2013). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (7 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvolutionary drivers of species delimitation in African polyploid complex trees genus Afzelia: insights from molecular phylogeny
Donkpegan, Segbedji ULiege; Duminil, Jérôme; Daïnou, Kasso ULiege et al

Conference (2015, July 13)

Background:. Molecular markers can improve our knowledge of the rain forest biodiversity, especially to decipher species evolution and delimitation within genera. In this study, we investigated ... [more ▼]

Background:. Molecular markers can improve our knowledge of the rain forest biodiversity, especially to decipher species evolution and delimitation within genera. In this study, we investigated evolutionary relationships among the Afzelia genus, an important tropical timber taxon in Africa.. Method: We used nuclear and chloroplast DNA associated with partial plastome sequences data to infer phylogenetic relationships among the six broadly distributed species of the genus: A. africana and A. quanzensis (savannah species), A. bipindensis, A. bella, A. pachyloba and A. parviflora (forest species). Using microsatellite markers (SSR), we also applied a clustering analysis (STRUCTURE) to verify whether the current taxonomic species delimitation matches the biological species concept. Result and discussion: Our SSR data showed for the first time that savannah species were diploid while forest species were tetraploid. Nuclear DNA separates diploid and tetraploid species in two distinct cladesbut plastid markers show that one diploid species forms a well-supported clade with the tetraploids, suggesting historical hybridization, possibly in relation with genome duplication (polyploidization) and habitat shift from dry to rain forests. The genetic structure observed with SSR confirms the taxonomic delimitation of the two diploid species and one tetraploid species (A. pachyloba). It also suggests the existence of a single Afzelia forest species in West Africa, and the presence of two distint species within the A. bipindensis taxon, with potential hybridization with A. bella. Conclusion: The evolutionary history of the genus Afzelia is complex and the potential link between polyploidization and habitat shift needs further investigation. Our data also show that species delimitation must be revisited, at least among three of the four rain forest species. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 367 (16 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailHigh spatial resolution of late-Holocene human activities in the moist forests of Central Africa using soil charcoal and charred botanical remains
Morin, Julie ULiege; Biwolé, Achille; Gorel, Anaïs ULiege et al

Conference (2015, April 27)

Palaeoecological and archaeological studies have demonstrated that human populations have long inhabited the moist forests of central Africa. However, spatial and temporal patterns of human activities ... [more ▼]

Palaeoecological and archaeological studies have demonstrated that human populations have long inhabited the moist forests of central Africa. However, spatial and temporal patterns of human activities have hardly been investigated with satisfactory accuracy. In this study, we propose to characterize past human activities at local scale by using a systematic quantitative and qualitative methodology based on soil charcoal and charred botanical remains. A total of 88 equidistant test-pits were excavated along six transects in two contrasting forest types in southern Cameroon. Charred botanical remains were collected by water-sieving and sorted by type (wood charcoals, oil palm endocarps, and unidentified seeds). A total of 50 Accelerator Mass Spectrometry 14C dates were also obtained. Results showed that charred macroremains were found at multiple places in the forest, suggesting scattered human activities, which were distributed into two main periods (Phase A: 2300-1300 BP – Phase B: 580 BP to the present). Charred botanical remains indicated two types of land use: (i) domestic, with oil palm endocarps most often associated with potsherds (villages) and (ii) agricultural, with charcoal as probable remnant of slash-and-burn cultivation (fields). Oil palm endocarp abundance decreased with distance from the identified human settlements. Our methodology allowed documenting, at high resolution, the spatial and temporal patterns of human activities in central African moist forests and could be applied to other tropical contexts. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailIdentification of charred botanical remains provides more accurate information on past history in Central Africa
Morin, Julie ULiege; Biwolé, Achille; Bourland, Nils et al

Poster (2015, January 30)

In palaeoenvironmental studies, charred botanical remains have rarely been identified to the species level before being sent to radiocarbon dating. Moreover, the age of most tropical spp. and thereby the ... [more ▼]

In palaeoenvironmental studies, charred botanical remains have rarely been identified to the species level before being sent to radiocarbon dating. Moreover, the age of most tropical spp. and thereby the age of the carbon sequestered during plant growth is not known. Dating unidentified charred wood in the tropics should be thus treated with caution because the accuracy of the dates is not guaranteed. Here we present 71 dates obtained on charred endocarps and wood charcoals sampled in soil pits in Cameroon and in the Rep. of the Congo. We taxonomically identified 43 samples then selected both identified and unidentified individual fragments for radiocarbon dating. We performed summed probability distributions of the dates calibrated in BP for the 43 identified and the 28 unidentified samples separately then for the whole dates. Results showed that the dates obtained on unidentified samples better fit the established chronology for Central Africa but that they also presented less precise standard deviations than the dates obtained on identified short-lived material, and that the dates on identified samples provide more detailed trends about the phases of human occupation in Central Africa after 2,500 BP. We can assume that dating unidentified material may introduce some blur into chronologies and that the selection of identified charred botanical remains should be systematically applied for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions in tropical contexts to refine the chronologies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (5 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMicrosatellite Development and Flow Cytometry in the African Tree Genus Afzelia (Fabaceae, Caesalpinioideae) Reveal a Polyploid Complex
Donkpegan, Segbedji ULiege; Doucet, Jean-Louis ULiege; Daïnou, Kasso ULiege et al

in Applications in Plant Sciences (2015), 3(1)

Premise of the study: Microsatellites were developed in the vulnerable African rainforest tree Afzelia bipindensis to investigate gene flow patterns. Methods and Results: Using 454 GS-FLX technique, 16 ... [more ▼]

Premise of the study: Microsatellites were developed in the vulnerable African rainforest tree Afzelia bipindensis to investigate gene flow patterns. Methods and Results: Using 454 GS-FLX technique, 16 primer sets were identified and optimized, leading to 11 polymorphic and readable markers displaying each six to 25 alleles in a population. Up to four alleles per individual were found in each of the loci, without evidence of fixed heterozygosity, suggesting an autotetraploid genome. Cross-amplification succeeded for all loci in the African rainforest species A. pachyloba and A. bella, which appeared tetraploid, and for most loci in the African woodland species A. africana and A. quanzensis, which appeared diploid, but failed in the Asian species A. xylocarpa. Flow cytometry confirmed the suspected differences in ploidy. Conclusions: African Afzelia species are diploid or tetraploid, a situation rarely documented in tropical trees. These newly developed microsatellites will help in the study of their mating system and gene flow patterns. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (11 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSoil charcoal to assess the impacts of past human disturbances on tropical forests
Vleminckx, Jason; Morin-Rivat, Julie ULiege; Biwolé, Achille et al

in PLoS ONE (2014), 9(11),

The canopy of many central African forests is dominated by light-demanding tree species that do not regenerate well under themselves. The prevalence of these species might result from ancient slash-and ... [more ▼]

The canopy of many central African forests is dominated by light-demanding tree species that do not regenerate well under themselves. The prevalence of these species might result from ancient slash-and-burn agricultural activities that created large openings, while a decline of these activities since the colonial period could explain their deficit of regeneration. To verify this hypothesis, we compared soil charcoal abundance, used as a proxy for past slash-and-burn agriculture, and tree species composition assessed on 208 rainforest 0.2 ha plots located in three areas from Southern Cameroon. Species were classified in regeneration guilds (pioneer, non-pioneer light-demanding, shade-bearer) and characterized by their woodspecific gravity, assumed to reflect light requirement. We tested the correlation between soil charcoal abundance and: (i) the relative abundance of each guild, (ii) each species and family abundance and (iii) mean wood-specific gravity. Charcoal was found in 83% of the plots, indicating frequent past forest fires. Radiocarbon dating revealed two periods of fires: ‘‘recent’’ charcoal were on average 300 years old (up to 860 BP, n = 16) and occurred in the uppermost 20 cm soil layer, while ‘‘ancient’’ charcoal were on average 1900 years old (range: 1500 to 2800 BP, n = 43, excluding one sample dated 9400 BP), and found in all soil layers. While we expected a positive correlation between the relative abundance of light demanding species and charcoal abundance in the upper soil layer, overall there was no evidence that the current heterogeneity in tree species composition can be explained by charcoal abundance in any soil layer. The absence of signal supporting our hypothesis might result from (i) a relatively uniform impact of past slash-and-burn activities, (ii) pedoturbation processes bringing ancient charcoal to the upper soil layer, blurring the signal of centuries-old Human disturbances, or (iii) the prevalence of other environmental factors on species composition. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 66 (18 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailImportance des modèles de distribution de niche potentielle dans la gestion des espèces tropicales exploitées: cas des taxons du genre Guibourtia Benn
Tosso, Dji-ndé Félicien ULiege; Daïnou, Kasso ULiege; Hambuckers, Alain ULiege et al

Poster (2014, September 24)

De la famille des (Fabaceae / Caesalpinioideae) et composé de 13 espèces en Afrique, le genre Guibourtia comporte des taxons à forte valeur culturelle et à forte valeur commerciale. Aujourd'hui, la ... [more ▼]

De la famille des (Fabaceae / Caesalpinioideae) et composé de 13 espèces en Afrique, le genre Guibourtia comporte des taxons à forte valeur culturelle et à forte valeur commerciale. Aujourd'hui, la pression de l'exploitation combinée aux faibles densités de ce genre, fait a priori peser d’importantes menaces sur certaines de ses populations. Un projet de recherche a donc été initié afin de mieux comprendre la structure et la diversité génétique des populations de Guibourtia, en lien avec l'exploitation forestière et les patrons de reproduction spécifiques. Un premier volet de la recherche a consisté à identifier les déterminants climatiques expliquant la distribution des espèces. Nous avons combinée des modèles statiques (Maxent et régression logistique) avec des données du modèle climatique global CNRM CM5, et sur la base de l'occurrence de ces taxons entre 1950 et 2000. Il en ressort que les espèces du genre Guibourtia sont sensibles aux facteurs précipitation (69,2 %) et amplitude thermique (74,3 %). Dans un second temps, il sera utilisé les modèles climatiques des ères géologiques passées afin d'inférer la distribution de l'espèce au cours du Quaternaire, et de faire le lien avec des analyses phylogénétiques et phylogéographiques. Il sera également possible d'évaluer la distribution future de l'espèce tenant compte des modèles d'évolution du climat. Enfin, le projet de recherche s'attèlera particulièrement aux relations phylogénétiques entre espèces morphologiquement similaires en sympatrie ou parapatrie, en caractérisant en détail les flux de gènes entre individus de ces taxons proches, ainsi que leur degré de similarité physiologique. Les résultats de l’étude in fine contribueront à proposer des stratégies de conservation et de gestion durable dans le contexte de l’exploitation forestière d’Afrique centrale et du changement climatique en cours. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 95 (17 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailRecords of human activity during the late-Holocene in the soils of the African dense humid forest
Morin-Rivat, Julie ULiege; Biwolé, Achille; Bourland, Nils ULiege et al

Conference (2014, April 30)

Recently, several authors gathered data about the presence of past human populations in tropical regions covered by dense forest nowadays. In central Africa, there is a growing body of evidence for past ... [more ▼]

Recently, several authors gathered data about the presence of past human populations in tropical regions covered by dense forest nowadays. In central Africa, there is a growing body of evidence for past human settlements along the Atlantic coast, but very little information is available further inland. In this perspective, soil records seem to be the most appropriated so as to appraise the spatial and temporal extent of human activity in the African dense humid forest. In this paper, we thus aimed to present a synthesis of the archaeological and archaeobotanical data obtained during several fieldwork campaigns in an archaeologically unexplored area of 200,000 km² located in southern Cameroon and the northern Republic of Congo. A total of 275 test pits, among them 30 pedological pits up to 150 cm deep, were excavated in the study area. So as to get a long temporal scale as well as a fine resolution spatial scale, we quantified wood charcoal and charred endocarps in soil samples by layers of 10 cm taken for 100 pits located along transects of systematic sampling. Spatial projections were performed using statistics together with multivariate analyses. AMS radiocarbon dating allowed interpreting the temporal framework. Evidence of past human activities through either artifacts or charred botanical remains was observed in all pits, in particular with the ubiquitous presence of charcoal at each site. Main charcoal peaks were interpreted as fields (slash-and-burn agriculture) in the vicinity of ancient villages, the later marked by the presence of both potsherds and oil palm endocarps. The dichotomy of these kinds of activities may have impacted differentially the environment during the past. The set of 73 radiocarbon dates extending from 15,000 BP to the present time provided more dates in the late-Holocene showing a bimodal distribution which was interpreted as two phases of human expansion with an intermediate phase of population crash. The 2300–1300 BP phase is correlated with the migrations of supposed farming populations from northwestern Cameroon. Between 1300 and 670 BP, less material could be dated. Following that population collapse, the 670–20 BP phase corresponds to a new period of human expansion known as the Late Iron Age. The dates obtained support the established chronology reported for whole central Africa. This study underlines the necessity of fieldwork efforts and of the usefulness of archives sealed in soil records so as to bring new, extensive and precise evidence of human activities in the Congo Basin. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 156 (26 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailHistoire humaine des forêts tropicales du nord du Bassin du Congo durant les deux derniers millénaires
Morin-Rivat, Julie ULiege; Biwolé, Achille; Bourland, Nils ULiege et al

Scientific conference (2014, March 26)

Identifier les indices d’activités humaines anciennes et les mettre en relation avec la composition floristique actuelle grâce à une approche multidisciplinaire.

Detailed reference viewed: 134 (24 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailRapport final du projet FRFC n° 2.4577.10. Dynamique des populations d’arbres et d’herbacées héliophiles en relation avec les anciennes perturbations anthropiques et climatiques
Doucet, Jean-Louis ULiege; Hardy, Olivier

Report (2014)

L’objectif principal de ce projet était d’étudier dans quelle mesure l’organisation de la biodiversité végétale des forêts d’Afrique centrale a été influencée par les activités anthropiques et les ... [more ▼]

L’objectif principal de ce projet était d’étudier dans quelle mesure l’organisation de la biodiversité végétale des forêts d’Afrique centrale a été influencée par les activités anthropiques et les changements climatiques qui se sont déroulés au cours des quelques derniers millénaires. A cette fin, cinq disciplines ont été utilisées : (1) l'archéologie afin de dater et de quantifier l’intensité de l’occupation humaine ; (2) l'anthracologie pour reconstituer la végétation présente lors du passage des feux ; (3) la dendrochronologie en vue d’établir des corrélations entre les événements passés et l'âge des arbres ; (4) l'écologie des communautés pour permettre de tester l’existence d’une corrélation entre l’abondance d’espèces héliophiles et les indices d’occupation humaine ; (5) la génétique des populations afin d'identifier des signatures génétiques d’anciens évènements de fragmentation et de changement démographique. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 56 (13 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSpeciation slowing down in widespread and long-living tree taxa : insights from the tropical timber tree genus Milicia (Moraceae)
Daïnou, Kasso ULiege; Mahy, Grégory ULiege; Duminil, Jérôme et al

in Heredity (2014)

The long generation time and large effective size of widespread forest tree species can result in slow evolutionary rate and incomplete lineage sorting, complicating species delimitation. We addressed ... [more ▼]

The long generation time and large effective size of widespread forest tree species can result in slow evolutionary rate and incomplete lineage sorting, complicating species delimitation. We addressed this issue with the African timber tree genus Milicia that comprises two morphologically similar and often confounded species: M. excelsa, widespread from West to East Africa, and M. regia, endemic to West Africa. We combined information from nuclear microsatellites (nSSRs), nuclear and plastid DNA sequences, and morphological systematics to identify significant evolutionary units and infer their evolutionary and biogeographical history. We detected five geographically coherent genetic clusters using nSSRs and three levels of genetic differentiation. First, one West African cluster matched perfectly with the morphospecies M. regia that formed a monophyletic clade at both DNA sequences. Second, a West African M. excelsa cluster formed a monophyletic group at plastid DNA and was more related to M. regia than to Central African M. excelsa, but shared many haplotypes with the latter at nuclear DNA. Third, three Central African clusters appeared little differentiated and shared most of their haplotypes. Although gene tree paraphyly could suggest a single species in Milicia following the phylogenetic species concept, the existence of mutual haplotypic exclusivity and nonadmixed genetic clusters in the contact area of the two taxa indicate strong reproductive isolation and, thus, two species following the biological species concept. Molecular dating of the first divergence events showed that speciation in Milicia is ancient (Tertiary), indicating that long-living tree taxa exhibiting genetic speciation may remain similar morphologically. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (21 ULiège)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPatterns of tree species composition across tropical African forests
Fayolle, Adeline ULiege; Swaine, Michael D.; Bastin, Jean-François ULiege et al

in Journal of Biogeography (2014), 41

Aim : In this study we identified large-scale variation in tree species composition across tropical African forests and determined the underlying environmental and historical factors. Location : Tropical ... [more ▼]

Aim : In this study we identified large-scale variation in tree species composition across tropical African forests and determined the underlying environmental and historical factors. Location : Tropical forests from Senegal to Mozambique. Methods : Distribution data were gathered for 1175 tree species in 455 sample sites scattered across tropical Africa, including all types of tropical forests (wet, moist, dry, and lowland to moderate elevation montane forests). The value of elevation and 19 climatic variables extracted from the BIOCLIM data set were assigned to each sample site. We determined the variation in species composition using correspondence analysis and identified the environmental correlates. We defined floristic clusters according to species composition and identified the characteristic species using indicator analysis. Results : We identified a major floristic discontinuity located at the Albertine rift that separated the dry, moist and wet forests of West and Central Africa (the entire Guineo-Congolian Region) from the upland and coastal forests of East Africa. Except for the Albertine Rift, we found no evidence to support the other proposed floristic discontinuities (Dahomey Gap etc.). We detected two main environmental gradients across tropical African forests. The rainfall gradient was strongly correlated with the variation in tree species composition in West and Central Africa. The elevation/temperature gradient highlighted the major floristic differences within East Africa and between East Africa and the Guineo-Congolian Region, the latter being most probably due to the geological disruption and associated climatic history of the East African uplift. Main conclusions : We found floristic evidence for three main biogeographical regions across the tropical African forests, and described six floristic clusters with particular environmental conditions within these regions: Coastal and Upland for East Africa, Dry and Wet-Moist for West Africa, and Moist and Wet for Central Africa. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 65 (22 ULiège)
Full Text
See detailImpacts of past Human disturbances on present-day tree species assembly in a tropical forest of South-East Cameroon
Vleminckx, Jason; Doucet, Jean-Louis ULiege; Daïnou, Kasso ULiege et al

Poster (2013, November 06)

Many evidence have been found for intensive past Human presence in the forests of Central Africa, notably widespread charcoal occurrence in the soil. Forest clearing for slash-and-burn agriculture may ... [more ▼]

Many evidence have been found for intensive past Human presence in the forests of Central Africa, notably widespread charcoal occurrence in the soil. Forest clearing for slash-and-burn agriculture may have favored the competitiveness of light-demanding species (LD) to the detriment of shade-bearer species (SB). Hypothesis: Positive correlation between abundance of charcoal in the soil (proxy for past Human clearing) and abundance of LD.Mostly “young” charcoals were thought to reflect past Human disturbances that would have shaped present-day species assembly. However, CAI 0-20cm and CAI 20-100cm were highly correlated with each other (r-Pearson = 0.55; P<0.001) and both displayed positive correlations with Non-Pioneer LD abundance (significant with a classic test) and negative correlations with SB abundance. Although this observation is coherent with our hypothesis, significance disappeared when correcting for spatial autocorrelation [4], even after removing small-diameter trees potentially too young to be linked with last Human disturbances (not shown). Correlation of CAI between the two soil layers => Humans found appropriate conditions for settlement in the same area at different periods? Absence of significant correlation in ❸ (i) Last Human disturbances are too old to detect any signal on present-day tree species assembly. (ii) Human impact is weak compared to other factors (soil properties, dispersal limitation,…) (iii) Local scale heterogeneity of LD abundance is weak compared to landscape scale. Parallel large scale gradients in the abundance of Non-Pioneer LD and charcoal abundance (proxy for past slash-and-burn activities) were observed, but a causal link cannot be established so far. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 89 (24 ULiège)