References of "Habyarimana, Jean Belt Adélite"
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See detailDevelopment of an HPTLC method for determination of hypoglycin A in aqueous extracts of seedlings and samaras of Acer species.
Habyarimana, Jean Belt Adélite ULiege; Baise, Etienne; Douny, Caroline ULiege et al

E-print/Working paper (2017)

Hypoglycin A (HGA) is a toxin contained in seeds of the sycamore maple tree (Acer pseudoplatanus). Ingestion of this amino acid causes equine atypical myopathy (AM) in Europe. Another variety, A. negundo ... [more ▼]

Hypoglycin A (HGA) is a toxin contained in seeds of the sycamore maple tree (Acer pseudoplatanus). Ingestion of this amino acid causes equine atypical myopathy (AM) in Europe. Another variety, A. negundo, is claimed to be present where AM cases were reported in the US. For unknown reasons, occurrence of this disease has increased. It is important to define environmental key factors that may influence toxicity of samaras from Acer species. In addition, the content of HGA in seedlings needs to be determined since AM outbreaks, during autumn period when the seeds fall but also during spring when seeds are germinating. The present study aims to validate a reliable method using high performance thin layer chromatography for determination and comparison of HGA in samaras and seedlings. The working range of the method was between 20 μg HGA to 408 μg HGA per ml water, corresponding to 12 - 244 mg/kg fresh weight or 40 - 816 mg/kg dry weight, taking into account of an arbitrary average dry matter content of 30%. Instrumental limit of detection and limit of quantification were of 10 µg HGA/ml and 20 µg HGA/ml water, respectively. Instrumental precision was 4% (RSD on 20 repeated measurements) while instrumental accuracy ranged between 86% and 121% of expected value. The HGA recovery of the analytical method estimated from spiked samaras and seedlings samples ranged between 63 and 103%. The method was applied to 9 samples of samaras from Acer pseudoplatanus, A. platanoides and A. campestre and 5 seedlings samples from A. pseudoplatanus. The results confirm detection of HGA in samaras from A. pseudoplatanus and the absence of detection in samaras of other tested species. They also suggest that detected levels of HGA are highly variable. This confirmed the suitability of the method for HGA detection in samaras or seedling. [less ▲]

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See detailLes nouveaux outils de diagnostic et de pronostic de la myopathie atypique
Habyarimana, Jean Belt Adélite ULiege; BOEMER, François ULiege; Amory, Hélène ULiege et al

in Proceeding de la 41ème Journée de la Recherche équine (2015)

In equines, ingestion of hypoglycin A, a toxin produced in the seeds (samaras) of sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) tree alters the energetic metabolism of muscle cells and results in atypical myopathy ... [more ▼]

In equines, ingestion of hypoglycin A, a toxin produced in the seeds (samaras) of sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) tree alters the energetic metabolism of muscle cells and results in atypical myopathy (AM). This alterations leads to a characteristic biochemical profile of acylcarnitines (AC) that enables to confirm the diagnosis of AM. This study aims at validating a methodology for the dosage of hypoglycin A in vegetal extracts but also in blood. In addition, the biochemical profile in AC has been determined in AM cases (5 survivors and 13 deceased) and in 5 horses suffering from exercise-induced myopathy. The AC profiles of these horses have been compared to the one of healthy horses (n = 35). This study showed that hypoglycin A was present in seeds and spring seedlings of sycamore and also in blood of AM cases horses. In addition, the establishment of AC profile contributes to the diagnostic and helps to assess the prognosis of AM cases. [less ▲]

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See detailDetection of hypoglycin A in the seeds of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) and box elder (A. negundo) in New Zealand; the toxin associated with cases of equine atypical myopathy.
McKenzie, R. K.; Hill, F. I.; Habyarimana, Jean Belt Adélite ULiege et al

in New Zealand Veterinary Journal (2015)

CASE HISTORY AND CLINICAL FINDINGS: During April and May 2014 four horses aged between 5 months and 9 years, located in the Canterbury, Marlborough and Southland regions, presented with a variety of ... [more ▼]

CASE HISTORY AND CLINICAL FINDINGS: During April and May 2014 four horses aged between 5 months and 9 years, located in the Canterbury, Marlborough and Southland regions, presented with a variety of clinical signs including recumbency, stiffness, lethargy, dehydration, depression, and myoglobinuria suggestive of acute muscle damage. Two horses were subjected to euthanasia and two recovered. In all cases seeds of sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) or box elder (A. negundo) were present in the area where the horse had been grazing. LABORATORY INVESTIGATION: The samaras (seeds) of some Acer spp. may contain hypoglycin A, that has been associated with cases of atypical myopathy in Europe and North America. To determine if hypoglycin A is present in the samaras of Acer spp. in New Zealand, samples were collected from trees throughout the country that were associated with historical and/or current cases of atypical myopathy, and analysed for hypoglycin A. Serum samples from the four cases and four unaffected horses were analysed for the presence of hypoglycin A, profiles of acylcarnitines (the definitive diagnosis for atypical myopathy) and activities of creatine kinase and aspartate aminotransferase. Markedly elevated serum activities of creatine kinase and aspartate aminotransferase, and increased concentrations of selected acylcarnitines were found in the case horses. Hypoglycin A was detected in the serum of those horses but not in the healthy controls. Hypoglycin A was detected in 10/15 samples of samaras from sycamore maple and box elder from throughout New Zealand. DIAGNOSIS: Cases of atypical myopathy were diagnosed on properties where samaras containing hypoglycin A were also found. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Sycamore and box elder trees in New Zealand are a source of hypoglycin A associated with the development of atypical myopathy. If pastured horses present with clinical and biochemical signs of severe muscle damage then the environment should be checked for the presence of these trees. Horses should be prevented from grazing samaras from Acer spp. in the autumn. [less ▲]

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See detailA validated method for quantifying hypoglycin A in whole blood by UHPLC-HRMS/MS.
Carlier, Jeremy; Guitton, Jerome; Moreau, Cecile et al

in Journal of Chromatography. B, Analytical Technologies in the Biomedical and Life Sciences (2015), 978-979

Hypoglycin A (HGA) is the toxic principle in ackee (Blighia sapida Koenig), a nutritious and readily available fruit which is a staple of the Jamaican working-class and rural population. The aril of the ... [more ▼]

Hypoglycin A (HGA) is the toxic principle in ackee (Blighia sapida Koenig), a nutritious and readily available fruit which is a staple of the Jamaican working-class and rural population. The aril of the unripe fruit has high concentrations of HGA, the cause of Jamaican vomiting sickness, which is very often fatal. HGA is also present in the samara of several species of maple (Acer spp.) which are suspected to cause seasonal pasture myopathy in North America and equine atypical myopathy in Europe, often fatal for horses. The aim of this study was to develop a method for quantifying HGA in blood that would be sensitive enough to provide toxicological evidence of ackee or maple poisoning. Analysis was carried out using solid-phase extraction (HILIC cartridges), dansyl derivatization and UHPLC-HRMS/MS detection. The method was validated in whole blood with a detection limit of 0.35 mug/L (range: 0.8-500 mug/L). This is the first method applicable in forensic toxicology for quantifying HGA in whole blood. HGA was quantified in two serum samples from horses suffering from atypical myopathy. The concentrations were 446.9 and 87.8 mug/L. HGA was also quantified in dried arils of unripe ackee fruit (Suriname) and seeds of sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) (France). The concentrations were 7.2 and 0.74 mg/g respectively. [less ▲]

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See detailPotentiated interaction between ineffective doses of budesonide and formoterol to control the inhaled cadmium-induced up-regulation of metalloproteinases and acute pulmonary inflammation in rats.
Zhang, Wenhui; Zhi, Jianming; Cui, Yongyao et al

in PLoS ONE (2014), 9(10), 109136

The anti-inflammatory properties of glucocorticoids are well known but their protective effects exerted with a low potency against heavy metals-induced pulmonary inflammation remain unclear. In this study ... [more ▼]

The anti-inflammatory properties of glucocorticoids are well known but their protective effects exerted with a low potency against heavy metals-induced pulmonary inflammation remain unclear. In this study, a model of acute pulmonary inflammation induced by a single inhalation of cadmium in male Sprague-Dawley rats was used to investigate whether formoterol can improve the anti-inflammatory effects of budesonide. The cadmium-related inflammatory responses, including matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity, were evaluated. Compared to the values obtained in rats exposed to cadmium, pretreatment of inhaled budesonide (0.5 mg/15 ml) elicited a significant decrease in total cell and neutrophil counts in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) associated with a significant reduction of MMP-9 activity which was highly correlated with the number of inflammatory cells in BALF. Additionally, cadmium-induced lung injuries characterized by inflammatory cell infiltration within alveoli and the interstitium were attenuated by the pre-treatment of budesonide. Though the low concentration of budesonide (0.25 mg/15 ml) exerted a very limited inhibitory effects in the present rat model, its combination with an inefficient concentration of formoterol (0.5 mg/30 ml) showed an enhanced inhibitory effect on neutrophil and total cell counts as well as on the histological lung injuries associated with a potentiation of inhibition on the MMP-9 activity. In conclusion, high concentration of budesonide alone could partially protect the lungs against cadmium exposure induced-acute neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation via the inhibition of MMP-9 activity. The combination with formoterol could enhance the protective effects of both drugs, suggesting a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of heavy metals-induced lung diseases. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluenza A strain-dependent pathogenesis in fatal H1N1 and H5N1 infections of mice
Garigliany, Mutien-Marie ULiege; Habyarimana, Jean Belt Adélite ULiege; Lambrecht, Bénédicte et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2010), 16(4), 595-603

Two different influenza A viruses showing no pathogenicity towards the laboratory mouse were forced to evolve by serial passaging. Although both adapted viruses evoked diffuse alveolar damage and showed a ... [more ▼]

Two different influenza A viruses showing no pathogenicity towards the laboratory mouse were forced to evolve by serial passaging. Although both adapted viruses evoked diffuse alveolar damage and showed a similar 50% mouse lethal dose and the same peak lung concentration, they elicited dramatically different pathological signatures and ARDS courses. In the absence of any virus labeling, a histologist unaware of which infection he was looking at could readily distinguish infections caused by these two viruses. This suggests that fatal infections caused by different highly virulent influenza A viruses do not necessarily share the same pathogenesis. The different histological pictures shown here refute the hypothesis of a single, universal “cytokine storm” underlying all fatal influenzal diseases. Research is thus crucially needed to identify underlying sets of virulence markers and to examine whether it might be advantageous to tailor treatment to the influenza virus pathotype. [less ▲]

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See detailDistinct pathological signatures after lethal avian H5N1 and swine H1N1 influenza infections suggest variable pathogenesis.
Garigliany, Mutien-Marie ULiege; Habyarimana, Jean Belt Adélite ULiege; Van de Paar, Els et al

in International Journal of Infectious Diseases (2010)

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See detailA Critical Appraisal of Carbon Monoxide Uptake Measurements for the Follow-up of Experimental Respiratory Diseases in the Laboratory Mouse
Habyarimana, Jean Belt Adélite ULiege; Flandre, Thierry; Faisca, Pedro et al

in Scandinavian Journal of Laboratory Animal Science (2009), 36(3), 229-240

Adaptation of double-chamber plethysmography to the laboratory mouse was recently proven to yield stable and reliable pulmonary function values. This approach to investigation of the respiratory function ... [more ▼]

Adaptation of double-chamber plethysmography to the laboratory mouse was recently proven to yield stable and reliable pulmonary function values. This approach to investigation of the respiratory function in mice owes its success to its decisive advantages in terms of non-invasiveness, practical implementation and generation of quantitative flow/volume measurements and nondisputed airway resistance calculation. When implemented to screen the resistance/susceptibility patterns to pathogens displayed by a panel of mouse inbred strains, the resistance value obtained was indeed able to detect tracheobronchic inflammation and to scale its severity. However, extension of the pathological process to most distal parts of the respiratory system did not translate in further alteration of resistance, suggesting that its value rather reflects constraints acting on airflow in the airways than pathologic processes located in the more distal parts of the lungs. In this context, we hypothesized that a more exhaustive functional picture could be obtained, still noninvasively, by combining double-chamber plethysmography with carbon monoxide (CO) uptake measurements. The feasibility of CO-uptake measurements in mice was demonstrated and the conditions under which reproducibility can be maximized were defined. Differences linked to strain, somatic growth, and sex were examined and discussed, and reference values in growing male and female conscious and healthy BALB/cBy, SJL/J, C57BL/6, C3H/HeN, DBA/2 and 129/Sv mice were given. Finally, double-chamber plethysmography and CO-uptake values were proven to be exquisitely complementary in assessing and dissecting the functional impact of Sendai virus pneumonia in the laboratory mouse. [less ▲]

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See detailHistopathological comparison of two mouse-adapted influenza A strains in mice.
Garigliany, Mutien-Marie ULiege; Habyarimana, Jean Belt Adélite ULiege; Cornet, Anne et al

Conference (2008, October)

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