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See detailSentinel-1 azimuth subbanding for multiple aperture interferometry - Test case over the Roi Baudoin ice shelf, east Antartica
Kirkove, Murielle ULiege; Glaude, Quentin ULiege; De Rauw, Dominique ULiege et al

in 2021 IGARSS: IEEE International Geoscience & Remote Sensing Symposium. Proceedings : July 12-16, 2021, Brussels (Belgium) (2021, July 13)

As an extension of Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferom- etry, Multiple Aperture Interferometry (MAI) is a spectral diversity technique that allows the determination of azimuth displace- ments from phase ... [more ▼]

As an extension of Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferom- etry, Multiple Aperture Interferometry (MAI) is a spectral diversity technique that allows the determination of azimuth displace- ments from phase shift measurements. This is made possi- ble through the creation of backward- and forward-looking Single-Look-Complex (SLC) data. Then, the phase differ- ence between the backward and forward-looking interfero- gram is translated into a displacement. Using SLC data, MAI requires a proper azimuth splitband operator. Different tech- niques exist to split the azimuth band, but they are often too briefly described in the MAI literature. In this conference pa- per, we analyze the signal properties of the Sentinel-1 TOPS acquisition mode and define an azimuth subbanding proto- col. In particular, we look at the role of de-apodization and apodization in the band filtering operation. We focus our anal- ysis on Sentinel-1 data in Interferometric Wideswath mode over the Roi Baudouin Ice Shelf, East Antarctica. [less ▲]

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See detailEmpirical Removal of Tides and Inverse Barometer Effect on DInSAR From Double DInSAR and a Regional Climate Model
Glaude, Quentin ULiege; Amory, Charles ULiege; Berger, Sophie et al

in IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing (2020), 13

Ice shelves—the floating extensions of the Antarctic ice sheet—regulate the Antarctic contribution to sea-level rise by restraining the grounded ice flowing from upstream. Therefore, ice-shelf change (e.g ... [more ▼]

Ice shelves—the floating extensions of the Antarctic ice sheet—regulate the Antarctic contribution to sea-level rise by restraining the grounded ice flowing from upstream. Therefore, ice-shelf change (e.g., ice-shelf thinning) results in accelerated ice discharge into the ocean, which has a direct effect on sea level. Studying ice-shelf velocity allows the monitoring of the ice shelves’ stability and evolution. Differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry (DInSAR) is a common technique from which highly accurate velocity maps can be inferred at high resolution. Because ice shelves are afloat, small sea-level changes—i.e., ocean tides and varying atmospheric pressure (aka inverse barometer effect) lead to vertical displacements. If not accounted for in the interferometric process, these effects will induce a strong bias in the horizontal velocity estimation. In this article, we present an empirical DInSAR correction technique from geophysical models and double DInSAR, with a study on its variance propagation. The method is developed to be used at large coverage on short timescales, essential for the near-continuous monitoring of rapidly changing areas on polar ice sheets. We used Sentinel-1 SAR acquisitions in interferometric wide and extra -wide swath modes. The vertical interferometric bias is estimated using a regional climate model (MAR) and a tide model (CATS2008). The study area is located on the Roi Baudouin Ice Shelf in Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica. Results show a major decrease (67 m ⋅ a −1 ) in the vertical-induced displacement bias. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison Between Surface Melt Days Estimation from a Regional Climate Model and Near-Daily Synthetic Aperture Radar Backscattering
Glaude, Quentin ULiege; Glaude, Quentin; Kittel, Christoph ULiege

Conference (2020, May 05)

Remote sensing has long been used as a powerful tool for the observation in cryospheric sciences. With the advances brought by the ESA Copernicus program, Earth observation goes a step further in its ... [more ▼]

Remote sensing has long been used as a powerful tool for the observation in cryospheric sciences. With the advances brought by the ESA Copernicus program, Earth observation goes a step further in its ability to get acquisitions at very high temporal rate. This is even amplified in polar regions due to heliosynchronism of satellites’ orbits. Earth observation shifts from sporadic observations to Earth monitoring. Observations are a critical aspect for the assessment of geophysical models. The ability of a model to replicate observations is crucial as a benchmark. It also allows to refine our comprehension of Earth systems, such as in cryospheric sciences. In this work, we are using the regional climate model MAR to compute the surface melt on a domain focusing on the Roi Baudouin Ice Shelf, Queen Maud Land, East Antarctica. From the results, we extract the number of days with surface melt in a region. In parallel, we employ remote sensing to obtain comparison data. Synthetic aperture radar appears as a solution of choice thanks to its day-and-night (critical in polar regions) and atmospheric-free capabilities. Radar backscattering anomalies between different dates are witnesses of substantial increase of soil moisture. Using Sentinel-1 in its wide-swath modes (namely Interferometric Wide Swath and Extra Wide Swath modes) and multiple satellite paths, near-daily acquisitions can be obtained. By comparing the two independent results, we better constraint model’s outputs while also better interpret SAR acquisitions. [less ▲]

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See detailSAR Remote Sensing
Glaude, Quentin; Glaude, Quentin ULiege

Learning material (2019)

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See detailRemoving Tides and Inverse Barometer Effect on DInSAR of Antarctic Ice Shelves
Glaude, Quentin; Glaude, Quentin ULiege; Berger, Sophie et al

Conference (2019, April 11)

Surface displacements are of particular interest for characterizing the dynamics of Antarctic ice shelves. Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) is a common technique from which ... [more ▼]

Surface displacements are of particular interest for characterizing the dynamics of Antarctic ice shelves. Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) is a common technique from which high-resolution velocity maps can be inferred at high accuracy. However, though vertical displacement may be useful in some contexts, the main component of interest is the horizontal velocity when analyzing ice fluxes. Since SAR sensors are side-looking, it is the vector sum of both the vertical and horizontal components along the line of sight (LOS) that can be measured, creating some ambiguity in separating the two elements. Impacted by ocean tides and inverse barometer effect (IBE), ice shelves are subject to a vertical bias to be removed. Here, we present an empirical technique using Sentinel-1 radar satellite and regional models to estimate and remove the corresponding bias and show preliminary results on the Roi Baudouin Ice Shelf (RBIS) in Dronning Maud Land (Antarctica). [less ▲]

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See detailEmpirical Correction of Tides and Inverse Barometer Effect Phase Components from Double Dinsar and Regional Models
Glaude, Quentin ULiege; Berger, Sophie; Amory, Charles ULiege et al

Poster (2019)

Surface displacements are of particular interest for characterizing the dynamics of Antarctic ice shelves. Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) is a common technique from which ... [more ▼]

Surface displacements are of particular interest for characterizing the dynamics of Antarctic ice shelves. Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (DInSAR) is a common technique from which high-resolution velocity maps can be inferred at high accuracy. However, though vertical displacement may be useful in some contexts, the main component of interest is the horizontal velocity when analyzing ice fluxes. Since SAR sensors are side-looking, it is the vector sum of both the vertical and horizontal components along the line of sight (LOS) that can be measured, creating some ambiguity in separating the two elements. Impacted by ocean tides and inverse barometer effect (IBE), ice shelves are subject to a vertical bias to be removed. Here, we present an empirical technique using Sentinel-1 radar satellite and regional models to estimate and remove the corresponding bias and show preliminary results on the Roi Baudouin Ice Shelf (RBIS) in Dronning Maud Land (Antarctica). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (8 ULiège)
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See detailTélédétection radar
Glaude, Quentin ULiege

Learning material (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 101 (17 ULiège)
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See detailCraternet - A Fully Convolutional Neural Network for Lunar Crater Detection (presentation)
Glaude, Quentin ULiege

Conference (2017, November 17)

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See detailCraternet - A Fully Convolutional Neural Network for Lunar Crater Detection
Glaude, Quentin ULiege

Speech/Talk (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (12 ULiège)